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Author Topic: Defining "classy"  (Read 4253 times)

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Waterlight

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2013, 02:54:28 PM »
Midnight Kitty:  No, that's not the couple I'm talking about... but I do agree Sheryl Crow showed a lot of class!  (Those who are curious about the identity of FM or the ex-SO can PM me--I don't want to hijack the thread!)
“The best lightning rod for your protection is your own spine.”--Ralph Waldo Emerson

NestHolder

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2013, 03:33:08 PM »
My grandma worked for much of her life as the cleaner in a local Bed & Breakfast.  She defined the Real Ladies and Real Gentlemen as the ones who spoke politely to her whenever they intersected.  The ones who ignored her or were rude were Not Classy.

I'm pretty sure she was right.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2013, 03:44:06 PM »
My grandma worked for much of her life as the cleaner in a local Bed & Breakfast.  She defined the Real Ladies and Real Gentlemen as the ones who spoke politely to her whenever they intersected.  The ones who ignored her or were rude were Not Classy.

I'm pretty sure she was right.

My great-grandma was watching me one day and said it was time I learned to be a Lady. I don't remember everything she told me, but she took me to a fancy resturant, we valet parked, there was a bathroom attended, it was a big to do for me. And she told me "Pay attention to how I speak" so I did. After our meal she asked me "Did you see how I spoke differently to each person?" and said I didn't, even though I promised I paid real close attention, she spoke to everyone the same way. She looked at me and said "Exactly, we speak to everyone with respect and kindness. No matter what job they do or how much money they have", best lesson ever. That was one classy lady.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2013, 03:55:18 PM »
There was one woman there who sneered at me that "Wine was what grown ups drink, it's classier then...beer", I smiled and said "Really? I thought the definition of class was being gracious, kind, and polite to those around you and has nothing to do with which alcohol you drink", she later got trashed on her fancy  pants wine and danced topless on the coffee table. Classy.

*snort*

I'm pretty sure that is the definition of lack of class.

And Glitter?  I love your great-grandma. Definitely the epitome of class.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

poundcake

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2013, 03:58:21 PM »
The two quickest ways for me to think someone is not classy is if they either mention that they are classy, or talk about how someone else is not. Bonus points for a "money can't buy class" comment.

I associate classiness with a certain kind of dignity in all situations, as well as the security to not have to be loud and obnoxious, and make a big spectacle of yourself. Hence, the Obamas? Classy. Kimye? No way.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2013, 04:13:02 PM »
I saw an interview with Tom Selleck recently.  He was asked if he had ever played the celebrity card at a traffic stop (by a police officer).  He said that when he was filming Magnum in Hawaii, he got more warnings than he deserved.  He said he would get caught speeding and the officer would look into the driver's window and say, "Excuse me, Mr. Selleck.  I didn't realize it was you.  You should really slow down.  Drive careful now. Good-bye."  Since I live in Hawaii, this had the ring of truth.

Then Mr. Selleck said, "Anyone who says to a cop 'Do you know who I am?' failed already and probably irritated the cop in the process."

My analogy to class is that others may recognize it and give the person with class a break, but if one finds it necessary to say 'I'm classy,' one has just established that they don't have any class."

I, too, had to laugh at the "classy" wine drinker dancing topless on the tables.  As we used to say, "If it wasn't for low class, she would have no class at all." >:D
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

veronaz

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2013, 05:21:24 PM »
I used to work with a woman who spent a lot of time trying to convince herself and others that she was “classy”, simply because she:

Went to an expensive private school when she was a child/young girl,
Married a successful attorney who left her a lot of money when he died,
Wore expensive clothes and jewelry,
Lived in an expensive suburb,
Got her hair and nails done twice a week.

Shortly after I started working there, hearing her talk about how classy she was became a huge turnoff.  I limited my contact with her (although that was difficult).  The strange thing was that most of the other people bought into her nonsense and liked her  - a lot.

Then on several occasions I heard her (openly) say some things which revealed that she was not only a phony snob, but a horrible racist.  Yet she grinned in the faces of people whose ethnicity she had disdain for.

Classy?  Not.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 05:29:18 PM by veronaz »

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2013, 05:38:02 PM »
I was just chatting with my coworker.  She asked where I found an item of clothing.  I told her that I shop at Savers, a thrift store.  She was stunned.  I said I buy over 90% of my clothes at Savers.  She exclaimed, "But you always dress so classy! You found nice clothes at a thrift store?"

Money can't buy class.
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2013, 06:31:55 PM »
When I think of class, I think of my father's mother.  When her children would ask her where the family stood on the socioeconomic ladder, she would answer "We are rich because we have all we need and we have each other, and that is all that matters."  I never heard her say anything negative about anyone, either, in fact she always seemed to try to find something nice to say about anyone. 

Then there's my folks and I'll try not to get going too much about them, but lordy they are snooty and much of it is about money and outward appearances. How they look to others, how much money a person has, how they dress, what they do, etc. My mother looked down on my IL's for having a smaller home and assumed they made less money, and looked down on MIL for being "frumpy and overweight". Yes, MIL is overweight and yes she likes wearing jeans and sweatshirts and to my knowledge has only worn a dress twice in her life but she's a good person and has been much warmer towards me than my family was to DH.

And yes, FIL has a strange sense of humor but heck, so do I! :)

I got so mad at my mother once though...I had a friend who was quite tall even in middle school. This girl was not overweight or even chubby, just strong boned and about 5'11.  She also liked the 90's grunge style.  My mother always griped (never too my friend) that she always looked like a boy, why couldn't she dress in a more feminine way? She's so strange!  ::)

Well come the night of the 8th grade dance I was going to meet this friend and another outside the doors of the school and this girl actually wore a dress, causing my mother to sneer "Nice dress, makes her look like a cross dresser..."  >:(

I've met so many folks in my neighborhood who are struggling to make ends meet but are very nice folks who would give you the shirt off their back anyway.  Now that's class.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

mime

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2013, 11:43:33 AM »
Three people come to mind:

When my SIL married, her new ILs were high-society wealthy folks (her FIL was Time's Businessman of the Year some time ago). I met the new MIL at the bridal shower. My DH's family was a bit intimidated and as soon as new MIL mentioned tea, someone said "oh! mime looooves tea! mime-why don't you sit here by Kitty?" Now I was barely out of my college years and not used to mingling with Mayo Clinic doctors and CEOs, etc. But Kitty was so disarming. Her behaivor was crazy-refined and her conversation was perfect; finding common interests and never making me feel like some shabby kid. When one guest at the shower said of Kitty's gift "those cost $300!" and another one sat on the floor and cut her toenails, Kitty didn't even seem to notice. She was classy.

A pastor had been assinged to my parents' church, who was a poor fit. He was a young-ish purple man sent to an aging blue congregation, and the situation brought out some very disappointing attitudes that I hadn't realized about these people. The pastor tried to reach out to the neighborhood which had become very diverse, and he tried other initiatives to revitalize the faith-community, but everything was met with "we don't want any changes" and personal insults. They took advantage of his willingness to help wherever needed, to the point that his job was more heavy-lifting and manual labor than pastoring. Anything that went wrong was his fault. But Pastor didn't say a thing, never blamed, never pointed fingers, and remained kind to everyone. Classy.

Finally, a celebrity. Whenever I see the near-end-of-season episodes of Project Runway where Tim Gunn visits the final few candidates. We see him visit so many different types of homes and lives. He greets everyone warmly, he finds things to compliment about their homes (some of which are very humble), and treats everyone like they are so important. He even took it in stride one season when a contestant's son tried to offer him a piece of dog poop. I suppose some of it could just be editing, but he sure looks like a classy guy from where I sit.


Hmmmmm

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2013, 11:57:25 AM »
My grandma worked for much of her life as the cleaner in a local Bed & Breakfast.  She defined the Real Ladies and Real Gentlemen as the ones who spoke politely to her whenever they intersected.  The ones who ignored her or were rude were Not Classy.

I'm pretty sure she was right.

My great-grandma was watching me one day and said it was time I learned to be a Lady. I don't remember everything she told me, but she took me to a fancy resturant, we valet parked, there was a bathroom attended, it was a big to do for me. And she told me "Pay attention to how I speak" so I did. After our meal she asked me "Did you see how I spoke differently to each person?" and said I didn't, even though I promised I paid real close attention, she spoke to everyone the same way. She looked at me and said "Exactly, we speak to everyone with respect and kindness. No matter what job they do or how much money they have", best lesson ever. That was one classy lady.

I love your great GM. That's my definition of class. Someone who makes you feel better about yourself after speaking with them. You can't be classy if your not gracious too.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2013, 12:07:59 PM »
My paternal grandparents were like that too (maternal grandparents might have been too, I just didn't get as many opportunities
to witness it.   And to be honest, it wasn't really my own observation but something a cousin commented on.

After Grandpa passed, my cousin pointed out that he had talked to everyone the same way, which is to say very kindly.  And in thinking about it, I don't remember seeing either of them ever behaving poorly towards anyone.

Heehee...I do remember that once my grandmother had once fallen all over my mother upon our arrival

GM: Oh you poor thing, you had to drive the whole way? Sit, sit, I'll get you something to drink.
Mom: Well actually I was in the passenger seat, your son drove.
GM: You had to sit the whole way, oh you poor thing, sit I'll get you something to drink!
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2013, 12:45:21 PM »
My parents' rule was 'Treat people the way you want to be treated.'  We bought our cars from a local dealership.  The service manager was a gruff man but we never had any trouble with him.  We were easy going - able to drop a vehicle off in the morning, pick it up in the afternoon so they could schedule it in where it fit.  Ended up that he would bend over backwards for us, fitting us in when there was an emergency, calling someone in on a Saturday when it was the only day we could get there, loaning my parents a car while I drove theirs because we were waiting for my new vehicle to come in.

He was fired.  Because if you treated him like something you found on the bottom of your shoe, he didn't treat you well.  And too many 'rich' customers were being alienated.  It was really too bad; the next service manager was terrible and we never bought another vehicle at that dealership.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

NestHolder

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #28 on: November 21, 2013, 02:42:46 PM »

My great-grandma was watching me one day and said it was time I learned to be a Lady. I don't remember everything she told me, but she took me to a fancy resturant, we valet parked, there was a bathroom attended, it was a big to do for me. And she told me "Pay attention to how I speak" so I did. After our meal she asked me "Did you see how I spoke differently to each person?" and said I didn't, even though I promised I paid real close attention, she spoke to everyone the same way. She looked at me and said "Exactly, we speak to everyone with respect and kindness. No matter what job they do or how much money they have", best lesson ever. That was one classy lady.

Your great-grandma was absolutely right!  Definitely a classy lady.

nuit93

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2013, 05:06:08 PM »
Classy people don't have to tell you how classy they are.

That sums it up for me too.