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Author Topic: Defining "classy"  (Read 4268 times)

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Twik

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2013, 06:38:38 PM »

Went to an expensive private school when she was a child/young girl,
Married a successful attorney who left her a lot of money when he died,
Wore expensive clothes and jewelry,
Lived in an expensive suburb,
Got her hair and nails done twice a week.


Am I the only person who first read this as a limerick with a really bad rhyme scheme?
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

veronaz

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2013, 06:50:47 PM »
:D @ Twik!

The thing is, people who constantly go on about things like that are begging for attention and compliments.  And some people are impressed.  In fact one co-worker said "xxxxx is soooo sophisticated and classy."  I bit my tongue, but inwardly did an eyeroll and changed the subject.

I also worked with someone who felt it necessary to announce that she was upper middle class - at least once a week.  I saw lots of eye-rolling..people didn't even try to hide it.

Yep, I've worked with some real doozies.  ::)

VorFemme

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2013, 07:35:11 PM »
My friend Kelly is a class act. I actually realized this at her wedding, it was a lovely wedding, she visited with all her guests (despite being fairly introverted), and truly made you feel like she was happy you attended your wedding (there are people who want you to be honored you're invited, and people who are honored you attended, she's the latter). But what really made her classy to me, her cousin's kids were running wild and cousin and cousin girlfriend were busy at the bar and "having a good time", finally Kelly (seeing the kids were out of control) wrapped up with the guest she was talking with, went over to the parents and with a big smile said "I'm so happy you guys are enjoying our wedding! And the kids are adorable, of course. But, they're getting too rambunctious and I'm going to need you guys to reign them in now. Thank you so much!", there was no bridezilla fit. It was in a kind and understanding tone, kids can start off well behaved and then get rambunctious, but it in this setting it needed to be reigned in. And I loved her phrasing, not asking, but not demanding either. Just a statement of fact, here's what needs to happen, make it happen. And the parents got the kids to settle down a bit.

I know several people who seem to think drinking wine=classy. I don't know why. Once I went over to a friend's for a small party, he served wine but then remembered I didn't care for wine and offered me a beer or cocktail. I didn't feel like hard drinking so I took the beer. I drink wine once in awhile, but it's one of those things I really have to be in the mood for (same with beer actually, but he buys my favorite kind). There was one woman there who sneered at me that "Wine was what grown ups drink, it's classier then...beer", I smiled and said "Really? I thought the definition of class was being gracious, kind, and polite to those around you and has nothing to do with which alcohol you drink", she later got trashed on her fancy  pants wine and danced topless on the coffee table. Classy.

Actually - I think that's "déclassé" - but I don't speak French, so I might be off on the exact definition. 

Trashy works, too.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
:D @ Twik!

The thing is, people who constantly go on about things like that are begging for attention and compliments.  And some people are impressed.  In fact one co-worker said "xxxxx is soooo sophisticated and classy."  I bit my tongue, but inwardly did an eyeroll and changed the subject.

I also worked with someone who felt it necessary to announce that she was upper middle class - at least once a week.  I saw lots of eye-rolling..people didn't even try to hide it.

Yep, I've worked with some real doozies.  ::)

I worked briefly with a woman who kept going on & on all during our months in training about she was a genius, graduated college really young, and more - to the point that it was almost a center square (free square) in conversation Bingo on a daily basis - no points because she said it so often that it would have made "winning" too easy.

She was fired for falsifying her records - turned out that her computer notations on who she'd spoken to that day didn't match up with the phone call records on her account (long story - everything tied to your ID # and there were NO matches for weeks at a time, by the time the audit got done). 

I don't think that she mentioned being "classy" more than a few times - but by then, if she mentioned being a natural red head female who loved dogs (she carried one around with her to after work events - her DH would come pick her up with the dog in the car) - I wouldn't have had trouble with all three traits.  I mean - Lucille Ball was a redhead thanks to henna (and that got worked into any number of scripts over her years in show business), female (had two kids), and all - but I'd never seen any proof (DNA scan, maybe) showing that Ms. Genius was really what she claimed to be. 

Poor doggie got stuck in the car with the windows rolled down with her spouse while he waited - so she couldn't have liked the doggie enough to let it stay at HOME, with food, water, and a way to get outside in a hurry!
« Last Edit: November 21, 2013, 07:49:12 PM by VorFemme »
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pierrotlunaire0

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #33 on: November 22, 2013, 10:37:00 AM »
A classy person should make others around them feel as if they have been treated with warmth, politeness, and respect.  A classy person will make you feel classy just being with them.
I have enough lithium in my medicine cabinet to power three cars across a sizeable desert.  Which makes me officially...Three Cars Crazy

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #34 on: November 22, 2013, 11:10:22 AM »
:D @ Twik!

The thing is, people who constantly go on about things like that are begging for attention and compliments.  And some people are impressed.  In fact one co-worker said "xxxxx is soooo sophisticated and classy."  I bit my tongue, but inwardly did an eyeroll and changed the subject.

I also worked with someone who felt it necessary to announce that she was upper middle class - at least once a week.  I saw lots of eye-rolling..people didn't even try to hide it.

Yep, I've worked with some real doozies.  ::)

I recall a conversation with my dad once and all I remember of it was him saying someone was middle class (I think it was someone on a tv show) and I said "Well, aren't we middle class too?" He kind of laughed, kind of smirked and said "Well, upper middle class."

Though I will say that much of the snobbery I saw growing up was from my mother, though they both seemed to think that the size of your house was a direct correlation to the amount you were able to spend.  ::) Like they just couldn't understand someone with a lot of money wanting a small house.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Emmy

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #35 on: November 22, 2013, 01:53:49 PM »
There are a lot of good examples of classy here.  Class is one of those things that is hard to define, but you know it when you see it.  Some people mistakenly think that living in a nice neighborhood, driving a nice car, or being well dressed and immaculately primped makes you classy.  They think being 'classy' gives them the right to look down on people they don't perceive as classy.  That is quite the opposite of classy. 

A few years ago I saw a news interview with a man whose brother had died fighting over seas.  Sadly, the Westboro Baptist 'Church' (I don't like to call them a real church) was going to travel to his funeral and protest.  The interviewer asked him how he felt about it and the man said something along the lines of "I don't agree with them, but my brother died so everybody including those folks can have their freedom of speech".  It really took a lot of class to handle such an awful situation with grace.

SamiHami

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #36 on: November 22, 2013, 02:10:48 PM »
There are a lot of good examples of classy here.  Class is one of those things that is hard to define, but you know it when you see it.  Some people mistakenly think that living in a nice neighborhood, driving a nice car, or being well dressed and immaculately primped makes you classy.  They think being 'classy' gives them the right to look down on people they don't perceive as classy.  That is quite the opposite of classy. 

A few years ago I saw a news interview with a man whose brother had died fighting over seas.  Sadly, the Westboro Baptist 'Church' (I don't like to call them a real church) was going to travel to his funeral and protest.  The interviewer asked him how he felt about it and the man said something along the lines of "I don't agree with them, but my brother died so everybody including those folks can have their freedom of speech".  It really took a lot of class to handle such an awful situation with grace.

Emmy, this example is the finest definition of class that I can imagine. Wow. You win the Internet today for posting it.

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

Ohjustlovely

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #37 on: November 23, 2013, 06:02:21 PM »
Classy, to me, can be defined in two separate ways:

One is "stylish," as in serving food or drink in a fancy way. Such as on a beautiful plate rather than right out of the carton, or in a nice glass such as a fluted beer glass rather than out of the can. There is nothing wrong eating out of a serving carton or drinking out of the can. It is simply more stylish, or classy.

The other term I consider for "classy" is "courtesy." Commenting that someone isn't "classy" or stylish is not classy. Or praising oneself is not classy. Nor is assuming the worst in someone, either actions or motives" is classy.

(I don't remember exactly, but I wrote "mole" and I was referring to the Mexican sauce, but wasn't sure whether there are dishes that actually had the ingredient of the animal mole, so I explained it was the sauce pronounced "mo-lay." Somebody responded that they knew how to pronounce "mole." Okay, excuse me. Wasn't very "classy" of that someone to assume the worse that I was assuming the worse ... Very silly.) :-)
 

TinyVulgarUnicorn

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2013, 06:45:41 PM »
The first thing that popped into my head when I thought about the word classy is Jackie Kennedy.  I've read so many wonderful stories about what a nice woman she was to people.  I think she's the definition of class.



Twik

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #39 on: November 23, 2013, 09:01:43 PM »
It's sort of like Fight Club. The first rule of being classy is that you don't refer to yourself as classy.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Ohjustlovely

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Re: Defining "classy"
« Reply #40 on: November 23, 2013, 11:00:06 PM »
Dirtyweasel: yes! POD!

Jackie Kennedy: gracious, charming, classy!

Hyancith Bucket: not.