Author Topic: Meat Pies  (Read 5306 times)

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DangerousKitten

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Meat Pies
« on: November 26, 2013, 01:14:26 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

Sharnita

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2013, 01:16:45 PM »
Pasties are extremely common in Michigan,  particularly the Upper Peninsula.

DangerousKitten

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2013, 01:46:52 PM »
What shape are they, and what do they contain?

Here in the UK the classic is of course the cornish pasty which is shaped kind of like a croissant and contains a fairly dryish meat mixture with potato, onion, and often peas, swede or other diced vegetables. A lot of places also serve flat, rectangular pasties containing beef chunks in gravy, and increasingly there are other flavours such as chicken and mushroom or cheese and onion.

I think I saw the guy on Man vs Food trying an American meat pasty, and he put ketchup on it, which I found bizzare and offputting.

veronaz

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2013, 01:52:44 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Sharnita

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2013, 01:53:28 PM »
Dry, meat, veggies,  potatoes (there is a rutabaga debate with many contending real pasties have them). Kind of half moon shaped, dense. Some people put gravy on them, some add ketchup,  some don't do either.  The area was a huge mining area and I believe they were ideal for miners to bring into the mines with them.

BigBadBetty

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2013, 01:57:57 PM »
I think pasties are not common in most parts of the United States. However, we have something similar called a pot pie which is common. Pot pies are not as portable as pasties, but I don't know the exact difference. I live in the Midwest. We had influx of miners from Cornwall so pasties are not uncommon. We also have the South American version: the empanada.

Here's article on pasties in the Midwest:
http://expressmilwaukee.com/article-18157-cornwall's-gift-to-the-midwest:-the-pasty.html

Nikko-chan

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2013, 01:58:23 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

I think DangerousKitten is talking about a different kind of meat pie veronaz. Something like this:

http://www.farmgirlfare.com/2012/11/recipe-traditional-english-cornish.html



And to answer your question DangerousKitten, if you have a recipe that is foolproof, yes I would like that recipe. I tried to make pasties before. They... did not come out well.

DangerousKitten

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2013, 06:01:57 PM »
It's really interesting to see that the traditional Cornish pasty has made it over to the US!

A place near us has started selling traditional miner's pasties - cornish one end, apple the other for dessert.

For my cornish pasties I use all butter for the pastry - I know traditionally lard is used but I find lard pastry gets all fall-apart-y on me.

Pastry:
110g butter
200g plain flour
touch of salt and pepper
2 egg yolks

Insides:
250g minced beef or diced braising/stewing steak
One medium-sized white potatoe
1 white onion
2 cloves garlic
1/2 pint liquid - either beef stock or half beef stock half stout
1 diced carrot
A handful of peas
Any other winter/root vegetables you have lying around, diced - swede, turnip and parsnip all go down pretty well
A little basil and rosemary
Salt
Black pepper

So, 110g butter, 200g plain flour, little salt and pepper, mashed up with cold hands until it forms a kind-of dough. Then knead in an egg yolk to make a proper pliant pastry dough and stick in the fridge.

If I'm doing it properly at this point I already have about half a pint of beef stock made from bones - otherwise packaged beef stock is fine.

Cook 1-2 diced white onions until browning, then add around 500g minced beef (or diced braising steak for extra yum) to brown until it's sticking to the pan. Add the garlic, diced, at the same time as the beef. Pour in the stock (or for a decadent British flavour, half stock half stout) and herbs. Let this simmer for  45-minutes to an hour, adding the vegetables at the appropriate points for them: potato nearly straight away, carrot and other root vegetables not long after, peas near the end.

Do this uncovered and stir occaisionally, more often as the liquid reduces.

Salt and pepper as you're going but bear in mind you will be reducing the liquid down.

At this point you ought to have very little liquid left. The key to getting a cornish to work is making sure the filling is really quite dry; you ought to be able to spoon it like cookie dough. If not, gently heat it to reduce a little more, or consider adding corn flour or gravy granules to thicken it.

Let the mixture cool while you sort out the pastry. It should be rolled pretty thick (this recipe makes one 'sharer' cornish for 2-3 people or 2 individual ones), and in a kind of fat oval shape.

Spoon the *cool* mixture into the middle, pull up the sides till they meet and squish it together with your fingers to create that signature cornish pasty ridge on top.

Glaze it with the remaining egg yolk, and stick on a greased baking tray for about 20 minutes at 160 Celsius.

--

That one never goes wrong for me except if I try to get fancy and use lard in the dough or put the mixture in when it's too wet or not cool.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2013, 06:58:00 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries

Sharnita

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2013, 07:09:11 PM »
Cornish people made it over here, they brought the food when they came.

katycoo

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2013, 07:41:57 PM »
What shape are they, and what do they contain?

Here in the UK the classic is of course the cornish pasty which is shaped kind of like a croissant and contains a fairly dryish meat mixture with potato, onion, and often peas, swede or other diced vegetables. A lot of places also serve flat, rectangular pasties containing beef chunks in gravy, and increasingly there are other flavours such as chicken and mushroom or cheese and onion.

I think I saw the guy on Man vs Food trying an American meat pasty, and he put ketchup on it, which I found bizzare and offputting.

I would put tomato sauce on a meat pie, sausage roll, or any meat-based pasty.  Seems perfectly normal and delicious to me.

An Australian meat pie is fully contained in pastry (so, not a pot pie) and most commonly contained beef chunks in gravy.  YUM-MO.

hobish

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2013, 07:50:28 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries

Maybe this is a dumb question ... is it still pronounced like it would be without the "r" or is it pasties like repast meaning meal? I am sure it is not based on the one my inner 12 year old is having fun with but I really never heard it pronounced. I've seen things like them in the US but i can't think where. Not HotPockets, somewhere real.  :) The recipe looks delicious.


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Dazi

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2013, 07:59:35 PM »
So, is it true that meat pies and pasties are not eaten in America?

If so, would any USians be interested in a recipie to try it out?

No, not true.
Chicken pot pie, also beef are common.
Pastries are very common in US, homemade and in bakeries and delis.

Pasties, not pastries

Maybe this is a dumb question ... is it still pronounced like it would be without the "r" or is it pasties like repast meaning meal? I am sure it is not based on the one my inner 12 year old is having fun with but I really never heard it pronounced. I've seen things like them in the US but i can't think where. Not HotPockets, somewhere real.  :) The recipe looks delicious.

Everywhere I've seen them, they've been called empanadas.  I'm not sure if it's the exact same thing or something similar.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Sharnita

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2013, 08:02:59 PM »
"Past" as opposed to "paste".

cwm

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Re: Meat Pies
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2013, 12:48:36 PM »
For me, pasties are a completely different thing altogether, and not at all appropriate for a thread like this. It took me a bit wondering if everyone was just misspelling.

It's not uncommon here to get chicken or beef pot pies, which are miniature pie crusts filled with thick stew-like meat and vegetables, then topped with more pie crust. You can get them in the frozen food aisle, though I've never seen the proper crusts or pans to make them at home, which makes me sad.

I'm actually familiar with meat pies. Every year at the Ren Fest, the Scottish Highland Games, the International Cultural Festival, and Irish Fest there's a meat pie vendor. My friend's dad, raised in Liverpool and Glasgow, has said they're the best meat pies he's had since coming to the USA.