Author Topic: common names for British coins?  (Read 2272 times)

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Monkey Maker

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Re: common names for British coins?
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2013, 03:36:33 PM »
Maybe just local to me but another term for loose coins is smash or mince.  Smash is more common though.

cabbageweevil

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Re: common names for British coins?
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2013, 11:43:36 PM »
Paper currency comes (now) in fives, tens and twenties (and before decimal currency 1 as well).

At the risk of "coming the annoying know-all"; we also have the 50 note, though it's not very often met with.  1 notes as opposed to coins, in fact stayed in circulation for a good while after decimalisation -- co-existing with pound coins: the 1 note was finally phased out, I think about twenty years ago.

Paper money in Scotland has differences from that in England.  The several different Scottish banks issue banknotes of individual designs, differing from bank to bank, and from the standard English notes. I think the Scottish banks still issue 1 notes -- that was so until very recently, anyway.  Also, the Scottish banks do 100 notes, as well as 50's ! -- and fives, tens, and twenties, of course.

scotcat60

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Re: common names for British coins?
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2013, 09:05:12 AM »
 In my experience, a bob was not a name for a pound, only for one shilling, which was made of twelve old pennies, or two sixpences. A sixpence was known as a tanner, hence the rhyme my Mum used to sing "Rule Britannia/Two tanners make a bob/Three make one and six/ And four two bob"

British Boy Scouts used to have "Bob a Job" weeks, when they went round asking householders if they could do small jobs for them, for a fee of one shilling. Girl Guides had something similar I believe with the slogan "Please give a shilling to a Guide who is willing", but that was dropped owing to the possible connotations  of the term "willing".

A pound is still known as quid. Half a crown, two shillings and sixpence, was "Half a dollar". A two shilling piece was a florin. 

I was interested in the origins of "Tanner" etc. Cabbage weevil. An old uncle of mine who had been in the Army in India in the 1920s used to say that something of very low monetary value wasn't worth a pice, this being a low denomination Indian coin.

cabbageweevil

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Re: common names for British coins?
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2013, 05:24:41 AM »
British Boy Scouts used to have "Bob a Job" weeks, when they went round asking householders if they could do small jobs for them, for a fee of one shilling. Girl Guides had something similar I believe with the slogan "Please give a shilling to a Guide who is willing", but that was dropped owing to the possible connotations  of the term "willing".

People and their dirty minds -- it gets wearisome, doesn't it?

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I was interested in the origins of "Tanner" etc. Cabbage weevil. An old uncle of mine who had been in the Army in India in the 1920s used to say that something of very low monetary value wasn't worth a pice, this being a low denomination Indian coin.

Intriguing, that the pice also, was imported to Britain as a figure of speech. In the old Indian currency, 12 pice made one anna, and as discussed previously, 16 annas = one rupee. When India decimalised its currency in 1957, it was thenceforth 100 "new pice" [naye paisa] to one rupee.

Snooks

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Re: common names for British coins?
« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2013, 03:41:02 PM »
I think the Channel Islands still use 1 notes.

Anyone else heard the term "coppering up"?  It means that you're down to coppers and you're counting them up to pay for something (often the last pint of the night in my experience!).  Use in a sentence would be "Are you coppering up?" if you saw someone counting out coppers to pay you for something.