Author Topic: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First  (Read 9553 times)

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veryfluffy

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2013, 04:08:56 PM »
I thought this comment from Abby was inane:

Quote
I'm not your mother, so I'll refrain from lecturing you about the empty calories you consume, which reduce your appetite for the healthy food you "should" be eating at mealtime.

If you are having a BLT and a hot fudge sundae, what earthly difference does it make which one you eat first?
   

Twik

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2013, 04:12:51 PM »
Well, again to quote your mother, if you don't quite have room for both, eating dessert first means you miss out on your proteins, grains and veggies.
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #32 on: December 02, 2013, 04:19:44 PM »
What was also odd was she said she'd "refrain from lecturing" when she did lecture.

Teenyweeny

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #33 on: December 02, 2013, 05:02:31 PM »
There are different rules for different types of dining situation. Everybody knows this. Only boors refuse to acknowledge it.

If I'm eating at home, I put on Netflix and feel free to eat out of the ice cream carton. If I'm in a restaurant with friends, then I will order that 3rd glass of wine. If I'm eating with my wife, we eat off each other's plates. None of these things are good ideas in a business situation.

In a business situation, you want to appear polished and professional. Eating your pudding first is neither of those things.




Eeep!

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #34 on: December 02, 2013, 07:26:57 PM »
There are different rules for different types of dining situation. Everybody knows this. Only boors refuse to acknowledge it.

If I'm eating at home, I put on Netflix and feel free to eat out of the ice cream carton. If I'm in a restaurant with friends, then I will order that 3rd glass of wine. If I'm eating with my wife, we eat off each other's plates. None of these things are good ideas in a business situation.

In a business situation, you want to appear polished and professional. Eating your pudding first is neither of those things.

You can't have your pudding if you don't eat your meat.  >:D
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Surianne

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #35 on: December 02, 2013, 09:36:54 PM »
Unless she's holding them up somehow, the coworkers are being ridiculous.    It's rude to lecture someone else about their eating habits, or to comment on them at all.  If they're embarrassed by someone eating food in a slightly unconventional order, they need to grow up.

Abby's response was judgemental and bizarre.  Calories?  Really?  There's no indication that the letter-writer is unhealthy in any way.

kitchcat

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #36 on: December 02, 2013, 10:34:33 PM »
I read this in the paper this morning and thought LW was a Bit of an SS but not rude to eat dessert first. Their explanation that they did it because they were "forced" to eat in the normal order as a child was just really odd to me. I'd guess that a majority of people were raised this way and you don't see droves of people ordering dessert before the meal. If it was a professional dinner, I'd have a hard time taking LW seriously with the way they explained it.
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Betelnut

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #37 on: December 02, 2013, 10:39:05 PM »
I sometimes eat dessert first at a work potluck or catered lunch (brought in for training).  Those are professional situations but no one is monitoring anyone else or even notices what others are eating.  At a restaurant I wouldn't do this.
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gramma dishes

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #38 on: December 02, 2013, 10:41:48 PM »
There are different rules for different types of dining situation. Everybody knows this. Only boors refuse to acknowledge it.

If I'm eating at home, I put on Netflix and feel free to eat out of the ice cream carton. If I'm in a restaurant with friends, then I will order that 3rd glass of wine. If I'm eating with my wife, we eat off each other's plates. None of these things are good ideas in a business situation.

In a business situation, you want to appear polished and professional. Eating your pudding first is neither of those things.

This. 

You don't look very professional if you feel you must "rebel" against your childhood eating practices while you are dining with coworkers. 

When at home, among close friends or family, then by all means indulge yourself in whatever food order you choose.  But at work it makes you look silly and immature and like you're doing it for attention.

sammycat

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2013, 10:44:06 PM »
When dining with friends or family, I don't think this would be a problem. I probably wouldn't think too much (if anything) about it in that case.

But, in a work environment, it comes across as unprofessional, attention seeking and childish, things to definitely be avoided if one wants to be taken seriously/professionally and/or get ahead.

White Lotus

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2013, 10:51:51 PM »
Often, we'll have dinner before a play or a concert and go on for dessert and brandy afterwards.  This reply is just for the person who wanted to go out for dessert only.  Yes, of course you can.  We're not the only people we see with dessert and brandy in restaurant lounges.  Enjoy!

EllenS

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #41 on: December 02, 2013, 11:27:47 PM »
Often, we'll have dinner before a play or a concert and go on for dessert and brandy afterwards.  This reply is just for the person who wanted to go out for dessert only.  Yes, of course you can.  We're not the only people we see with dessert and brandy in restaurant lounges.  Enjoy!

POD.  Back when going out was recreational and did not involve monitoring small people's macronutrients, we would often go out for just coffee and dessert - it was a nice way to enjoy an upscale restaurant where we couldn't afford the entree.

sweetonsno

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #42 on: December 03, 2013, 12:31:43 AM »
I'm in camp "not necessarily rude, but probably a bad idea."

Others have already mentioned the reasons why more conventional behavior is a good idea in a business setting.

As for the rudeness, LW is essentially eating two courses when everyone else eats one. Even if she orders them at the same time, chances are that it will take her longer to finish eating. It's not particularly conscientious to waylay a tableful of diners who are pressed for time. (If she is finishing at the same time, I wonder whether she is able to participate fully in the conversation given the extra food she's eating.)

katycoo

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #43 on: December 03, 2013, 12:35:52 AM »
As for the rudeness, LW is essentially eating two courses when everyone else eats one. Even if she orders them at the same time, chances are that it will take her longer to finish eating. It's not particularly conscientious to waylay a tableful of diners who are pressed for time. (If she is finishing at the same time, I wonder whether she is able to participate fully in the conversation given the extra food she's eating.)

Well, I'm assuming that at least some people will go on to order dessert after the mains so I don't think time is an issue.

Miss Unleaded

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Re: Today's Dear Abby - Eating Dessert First
« Reply #44 on: December 03, 2013, 03:58:46 AM »
As for the rudeness, LW is essentially eating two courses when everyone else eats one. Even if she orders them at the same time, chances are that it will take her longer to finish eating. It's not particularly conscientious to waylay a tableful of diners who are pressed for time. (If she is finishing at the same time, I wonder whether she is able to participate fully in the conversation given the extra food she's eating.)

Well, I'm assuming that at least some people will go on to order dessert after the mains so I don't think time is an issue.

Maybe it's different in the US, but at most restaurant meals I've enjoyed, in both business and social settings, the party did not make a decision on whether to eat dessert or not until after everyone at the table had finished their mains.  Unless the LW is ordering the dessert in place of a starter, this would almost certainly be disruptive to everyone else's dining experience.  If she received both courses at once, the rest of the table would either have to wait for her to finish her second course (the main) before asking for the dessert menu, or otherwise interrupt her meal to do it.

It would just throw off the tempo of the situation.

Also, as others have said, her behaviour and especially her explanation for it (rebelling against childhood parenting?   ??? ) make her seem childish, attention seeking and snowflakey.