Author Topic: teachers email  (Read 9070 times)

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Deetee

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2013, 02:22:46 AM »
And i think it is a good thing when the teacher communicates with the parents. Especially when they are going kids will believe that parents actually know everything that goes on even when the parents are not present. So letting the kids know that you know about the tough day keeps that going.

Behavior is best reinforced by both the parent and teacher working together and responding appropriately.

camlan

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2013, 07:14:23 AM »
Every teacher I know says that the weeks between Thanksgiving and winter break are tough--the kids know the big holiday is coming and they all get excited and act out a bit more. I believe Lilacgirl's daughter is quite young, around kindergarten or first grade.

I'm wondering if this teacher is fairly new and wasn't expecting this.

I can understand sending a note home when the entire class is acting up. But this note focuses on the consequences of the behavior--the sticks and the gumballs--and doesn't give a clue as to what behaviors led to these consequences.

For the parents to have a meaningful talk with their kids, they need to know what happened. Telling a young child, "You need to be more respectful in class," isn't going to do much. Telling a child, "You need to stay in your seat in class," "You should not yell in class," "You should not laugh at someone who is breaking the class rules," would be far more effective.

So sending an email to the parents seems like a good idea, but this note falls short in that it does not give the parents enough information to do what the teacher asks them to do.

And I have to wonder, if the teacher is having this much trouble with the class now, what will things be like in two weeks, when the kids will be *really* wound up?
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


CakeEater

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #32 on: December 05, 2013, 07:24:51 AM »
Let's give her a break, though. It may not be a perfect email, but teachers are pretty busy people.

newbiePA

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2013, 08:12:50 AM »
Not a teacher, and I don't have children in school yet, but I wonder if the lack of specifics is due to privacy concerns?  I know at my little one's day care, they can share if there is a case of hand foot and mouth in the classroom, but cannot tell us what child.
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MorgnsGrl

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #34 on: December 05, 2013, 08:24:10 AM »
I think it's great when teachers communicate what's going on in class to parents, especially when some kind of class-wide punishment is enacted - otherwise kids might go home and tell their parents that the "mean" teacher wouldn't let them have recess and it turns into a big mess. That said, I think in this instance the teacher's communication left a lot to be desired. She did not clearly spell out what the children's misbehavior was, which makes it very difficult for parents to address the behavior, and since that's what she was asking the parents to do... I think she's not going to get the support she was hoping for. "Suzy, Teacher says your class isn't behaving. Behave," is unlikely to produce any sort of results. Parents need to hear specifics, like, "The kids are talking too much and not paying attention," or whatever.

*inviteseller

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #35 on: December 05, 2013, 08:52:51 AM »
I think some posters are judging the teacher unfairly.  I don't care if you are a first year teacher or have been at it for 30 years, if the kids are all acting up, the teacher has to find a way to get things back on track.  I applaud this teacher for her finding a way that was both punishment but a learning experience.  My older DD had a teacher that would just lose.her.mind when the domino effect of behavior spread through the class...and she had a teacher that would sit them down as a group and talk to them, but also have them join in the discussion about what is/isn't proper behavior.  The screamer never sent notes to let us know what was going on, I just got tearful conversations with my child.  The teacher who did the discussion groups sent home a note and talked about her expectations and how we, as parents could reinforce them. 

OP, I think, as being new to the whole school thing with your child, you are sensitive to anything that may seem like criticism of your child, but remember, even the smartest and best behaved have bad days too.  Doesn't mean anything other than they are human and as long as you talk about it and remind them about good behavior and give them coping skills on how not to be caught up in the group mentality, you are doing fine.  Don't stress..she is little and is learning.

Mergatroyd

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #36 on: December 05, 2013, 10:08:51 AM »
Every teacher I know says that the weeks between Thanksgiving and winter break are tough--the kids know the big holiday is coming and they all get excited and act out a bit more. I believe Lilacgirl's daughter is quite young, around kindergarten or first grade.

I'm wondering if this teacher is fairly new and wasn't expecting this.

I can understand sending a note home when the entire class is acting up. But this note focuses on the consequences of the behavior--the sticks and the gumballs--and doesn't give a clue as to what behaviors led to these consequences.

For the parents to have a meaningful talk with their kids, they need to know what happened. Telling a young child, "You need to be more respectful in class," isn't going to do much. Telling a child, "You need to stay in your seat in class," "You should not yell in class," "You should not laugh at someone who is breaking the class rules," would be far more effective.

So sending an email to the parents seems like a good idea, but this note falls short in that it does not give the parents enough information to do what the teacher asks them to do.

And I have to wonder, if the teacher is having this much trouble with the class now, what will things be like in two weeks, when the kids will be *really* wound up?

It won't be. If it is kindergarten, about half the class won't even show up the last week. Some parents think the kids do nothing but make arts and crafts so they won't bother bringing them in, others will pull the kids out to travel, some will have the too-many-cookies flu, and yet others will decide that it's not christmassy to attend.
One year, only seven kids out of 24 were there on the last day.

lady_disdain

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #37 on: December 05, 2013, 10:20:51 AM »
Not a teacher, and I don't have children in school yet, but I wonder if the lack of specifics is due to privacy concerns?  I know at my little one's day care, they can share if there is a case of hand foot and mouth in the classroom, but cannot tell us what child.

Also, if the teacher is trying to send a note to parents quickly, before the kids start whining and complaining, she isn't going to have time to write 20 individual notes.

To me, it feels like one of those situations where everyone is jittery, excited and feeding off one another. Perhaps there isn't something specific for each kid but they are all contributing to the chaos. Talking to a child about good behaviour in class will do no harm.

lady_disdain

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #38 on: December 05, 2013, 10:23:11 AM »
I'm wondering if free play is an in class reward time. The way my school day is structured we are NOT allowed to take away recess, except for bad weather. We are required to have so many minutes of exercise time a week - we make the amount by having 45 min of PE a week, and 30 min of recess a day.


My kids had 7 oh no points and 3 Oh YEA points today. So the whole class had 4 laps around the blacktop - but the kids on superstar* only had to do one. The kids on yellow had to do 3 more after the class was done. The kids on red had to do 5 more after the class was done, and the kid on note home had to do 10 more after the class was done (I let him go early because he accepted his consequences). The afternoon was much more in line. (Most of the Oh No points were from Yesterday afternoon they go from recess to recess)


My color/behavior chart goes


Superstar (Trying above and beyond)

Green (Everyone starts the day)
Yellow
Red
note home

I really don't like the idea of associating exercise with punishment for young kids (older kids involved in athletics? sure!). I understand what you were doing (burn off energy) but it may create bad associations.

Said by someone who grew to hate exercise because of bad PE classes.

LilacGirl1983

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #39 on: December 05, 2013, 11:05:59 AM »
Hi Here some answers. My daughter is in Kindergarten and we are at a 45/15 day schedule. So Starting the week of Christmas they are off for 3 weeks almost. They only had a 4 day vacation for Thanksgiving...the day of the day after Thanksgiving off. I asked my daughter what happened and she said she a couple of friends acted up but didnt provide many details. She is new and still feeling her way out. I don't know why it just rubbed me the wrong way. Maybe the lack of examples or something. Just wanted to get others view to make sure I wasnt making a mountain out of a mole hill :) Not sure about if the free play is associated with recess or not will have to ask! Our daughter told us last night that the teacher told her that Christmas is to celebrate Jesus and we are agnostic/atheist. So I am just going to call and inquire if that was taught to the children or whats going on.

Jones

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #40 on: December 05, 2013, 11:16:14 AM »
I have a feeling the teacher is going to get a lot of requests for more information. I know that my daughter had a difficult time explaining details when things happened at school. Kids will latch onto a detail and blow it out of proportion while totally ignoring or forgetting quite a bit of necessary context. A few details (like, remind your children to raise their hands instead of shouting answers) would not have lengthened the email much and would save her having to answer the inevitable individual inquiries.

EllenS

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #41 on: December 05, 2013, 11:25:58 AM »
Our daughter told us last night that the teacher told her that Christmas is to celebrate Jesus and we are agnostic/atheist. So I am just going to call and inquire if that was taught to the children or whats going on.

Well, that IS the history of the holiday called "Christmas".  I mean, Solstice holidays are older but it is where the word comes from.  That may just have been factually accurate information.  Our kids in public school sometimes have lessons on various cultural/historical holidays, including Hannukah, Passover, Christmas, Eid, Thanksgiving, and probably Diwali, as we have a very multicultural student base.

I think if you have concerns, asking for clarification from the teacher is the right thing to do.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2013, 11:28:28 AM »
I have a feeling the teacher is going to get a lot of requests for more information. I know that my daughter had a difficult time explaining details when things happened at school. Kids will latch onto a detail and blow it out of proportion while totally ignoring or forgetting quite a bit of necessary context. A few details (like, remind your children to raise their hands instead of shouting answers) would not have lengthened the email much and would save her having to answer the inevitable individual inquiries.

I had a thought about this this morning. Now it was before coffee, so it might be totally off the wall crazy. But I wonder if her vagueness was to see which parents responded back with more questions. Kind of way to find out which parents are going to be involved and care and which parents are going to take the "I send them to you to teach, you teach them!" method of parenting.

I know, vaguely conspiracy theory, and again pre-coffee.

mbbored

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #43 on: December 05, 2013, 11:30:17 AM »
I don't think there's anything terribly wrong with that email. If I had a child and received a message like that, we'd have a conversation about using inside voices, waiting your turn, listening to the teacher, etc; just generally about how one behaves at school.

Roe

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #44 on: December 05, 2013, 03:43:49 PM »
I agree with those who say this email is lacking information.   The teacher is basically venting that she had to punish the kids, but not explaining what they were doing or giving anything specific to address.   It sounds as though the teacher is very stressed and overwhelmed.      Ending with "we will see how it goes".... well yeah, you're the teacher.   You will have good days and bad days and you need to deal with that.   

I don't think it's a very professional email at all, it seems to be more of a cry for help.   I'd be making a point of going in to speak with teacher to see what the issues are and if there is anything specific my kid was doing that I need to address.

This is how I see the email.  And the line  "let's see how it goes" would irk me.  After all, she's the teacher.  Classroom management?