Author Topic: teachers email  (Read 10150 times)

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LilacGirl1983

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teachers email
« on: December 04, 2013, 05:37:13 PM »
Not sure if I am just cranky but something about this rubbed me the wrong way:

Parents:

I just wanted to let you all know (I told the kids that I would be sending an e-mail out) that unfortunately the kids did not get to have free play today.

Instead we had a good long heart to heart talk about respect and responsibility as an entire class.  I actually ran out of warning sticks, 1st time, this afternoon and I ended up erasing some gumballs on the gumball machine (which they work so hard for).

I am asking that you also have a good heart to heart talk with your kids over the next couple days about what a good student looks like and sounds like.

I know Winter Break is just weeks away, but we have a lot to get done by then.

Tomorrow is a new day and we will see how it goes.

Teacher


Thoughts?

LadyL

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2013, 05:43:41 PM »
It sounds like the teacher is at the end of her rope, but she doesn't actually explain *why* or provide constructive advice to the parents. Is the issue too much roughhousing, or talking during class, or too much teasing/antagonizing behavior on the playground? I would want more information than just a suggestion to "talk to them about  being a good student." And I'd want to know if my kids was one of the ones causing problems or not.

AustenFan

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2013, 05:45:17 PM »
To a third party it just sounds like a teacher reaching out for help. Can you pinpoint what rubbed you the wrong way? Is there backstory that influences the way you're reacting?

If your child was one of the ones severely misbehaving you probably would have received an email with details about their behavior.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2013, 05:47:03 PM »
It sounds to me like the class was misbehaving, and the teacher "punished" them and wanted to let the parents know what happened and also ask the parents to reinforce what she talked with them about at home.

As for mentioning winter break, well I think everyone gets a bit of "seniorites" when you're nearing a break. Teacher wants parents to reinforce to students that school is still going on and still important.

I'd assume the whole class was a bit...off and the teacher can't pinpoint a handful of students. I know when I was in school teachers would end up sending these notes home. Maybe nothing too serious, just late homework, goofing off in class, talking in class, everyone kind of being off task.

EllenS

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2013, 05:47:48 PM »
Age of the class? for kids up through maybe 7 years old it seems fairly normal to me. if they are older than that I worry that the teacher is using a management system that is too babyish for them.

My 1st grader's class has group goals and group incentives that they work for, like extra play periods, and will sometimes report that they won or lost their goal, so I don't have a problem with that per se.  I would hope that kids who specifically misbehaved are also corrected individually.

I do kind of wonder why the teacher bothered to send an email.  It kind of makes me wonder whether she is out of her depth managing the class, if she has to threaten them with telling their parents.

Is she a new teacher?  She sounds overwhelmed.

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aiki

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2013, 05:59:08 PM »
The e-mail is a bit short on context. What sort of behavior gets a warning stick? What relevance do gumballs have? What were the kids actually doing that was disrespectful and irresponsible?

I think that it's fine for the teacher to ask for parental backup, but it's a bit difficult to do that when you don't know whether we're discussing talking without raising one's hand or running with scissors while pouring glue over the class pet. It would also be helpful if the teacher discussed their objectives and methods at an adult level, along with some useful the parents might want to try.
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AvidReader

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2013, 06:00:31 PM »
If you are in the US, the kids just got back from the Thanksgiving holiday and many were no doubt exposed to the start of holiday mania here.

On the one hand, she put all the kids in the same boat.  Without a doubt, the number of instigators of the unacceptable behavior is small, but the teacher is making it clear that it is the responsibility of every student to comport themselves to meet her expectations.  From certain words, "warning stick" and "gumball machine," it would seem that these are very young children.  Let's face it, little ones are easily distracted, tough to settle down, and are at the point of learning impulse control. 

If she had gone into detail regarding the unacceptable behaviors, the children would have all been pointing fingers......after all, my child is a well-behaved angel and said it was (pick a few names) who were bad.  It could be that she sent personalized emails to the parents of the clearly guilty parties and the generalized email to the rest.   One kid may start something, but even the most well-behaved at that age can be inadvertantly drawn it to it. 

Sadly, it will be the responsible parents of the well-behaved children who will have the "talk," and the parents of the miscreants will just blow it off or start blaming everyone else. 

What I wouldn't do with my child if this were my situation, would be do a  "Sherlock Holmes" and conduct an inquiry of my child to try to nail down what happened.  It won't go anywhere.  I'd just have the talk as requested. 

Hmmmmm

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2013, 06:09:30 PM »
I'm pretty ok with it. I think it gives parents an opportunity foe an open discussion with their kids without any preconceived ideas.

Mom: Tina, I read teachers note. It sounds like you guys had a tough day. What's happening in class?

And Tina can say she got in trouble for talking or say that Sara was picking on Jeremy and then Todd joined in.

Library Dragon

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2013, 06:16:49 PM »
To a third party it just sounds like a teacher reaching out for help. Can you pinpoint what rubbed you the wrong way? Is there backstory that influences the way you're reacting?

If your child was one of the ones severely misbehaving you probably would have received an email with details about their behavior.

This.  It's not uncommon for a whole class to feed off each other's emotions and get really wound up.  The teacher is asking for a partnership with the parents and is hoping for a better day. 

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Mergatroyd

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2013, 06:18:51 PM »
I'm pretty ok with it. I think it gives parents an opportunity foe an open discussion with their kids without any preconceived ideas.

Mom: Tina, I read teachers note. It sounds like you guys had a tough day. What's happening in class?

And Tina can say she got in trouble for talking or say that Sara was picking on Jeremy and then Todd joined in.
POD


Two Ravens

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2013, 06:21:50 PM »
Did you talk to your child and find out what went on during school that day? Definitely sounds like there was a precipitating incident...

miranova

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2013, 06:23:00 PM »
I don't see any issue with this email.  I'm assuming the OP has an issue with it, otherwise she wouldn't have posted it, but I just can't find it.  Is it perfect?  Maybe not, but is that the standard expected?  It can be very overwhelming to have a really bad day with a group of students.  She is letting you know why the students missed recess and asking for reinforcement.  Sounds reasonable to me.

Ceallach

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2013, 06:43:14 PM »
I agree with those who say this email is lacking information.   The teacher is basically venting that she had to punish the kids, but not explaining what they were doing or giving anything specific to address.   It sounds as though the teacher is very stressed and overwhelmed.      Ending with "we will see how it goes".... well yeah, you're the teacher.   You will have good days and bad days and you need to deal with that.   

I don't think it's a very professional email at all, it seems to be more of a cry for help.   I'd be making a point of going in to speak with teacher to see what the issues are and if there is anything specific my kid was doing that I need to address.   
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Deetee

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2013, 06:55:22 PM »
The only thing that annoy me is the fact that the teacher took away free play. Assuming free play is outdoor unstructured run around type play, I would be really annoyed that took away the one thing that works best to calm down an unruly class. My friends grade one class even does laps at the end of recess to help maintain order.

The rest of email makes it sound like this was a whole class problem. I don't think a kid needs to misbehave to  cause trouble. Laughing and egging on other kids can help this sort of ruckus. It sounds like a good time to talk about good classroom behaviour in a non-accusatory manner with your kid. Help out the teacher and encourage all kids to be helpful in maintaining an appropriate classroom tone.
 

Mergatroyd

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Re: teachers email
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2013, 07:00:32 PM »
The only thing that annoy me is the fact that the teacher took away free play. Assuming free play is outdoor unstructured run around type play, I would be really annoyed that took away the one thing that works best to calm down an unruly class. My friends grade one class even does laps at the end of recess to help maintain order.

The rest of email makes it sound like this was a whole class problem. I don't think a kid needs to misbehave to  cause trouble. Laughing and egging on other kids can help this sort of ruckus. It sounds like a good time to talk about good classroom behaviour in a non-accusatory manner with your kid. Help out the teacher and encourage all kids to be helpful in maintaining an appropriate classroom tone.

Actually the OP should clarify that. When my kids were in Kindergarten "free play" was Separate and on top of recess and lunch (outdoor play times). It was like free time, where the kids could play at whatever centre they wanted to. I can absolutely see how a teacher could decide to use that time to have a class discussion about appropriate behaviour if they had been acting up.
Missing recess (outdoor play) is a rather different thing, as it implies something serious enough to convince the teacher to give up her own break to punish them. That, I would definitely be wanting to know more about.