Author Topic: Pigs in Blankets  (Read 3302 times)

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DaisyG

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Pigs in Blankets
« on: December 05, 2013, 10:52:53 AM »
In the thread on your family's traditional holiday meals, Hmmmmm mentioned that her family always have 'Pigs in Blankets' for breakfast, then described the process of wrapping sausages in dough and baking. I have only heard 'pigs in blankets' used for sausages (either chipolatas or cocktail sausages) wrapped in bacon which I think is the traditional usage in the UK.

What do you call 'Pigs in blankets'? Do you have another dish called this? Do you have another name for bacon or dough wrapped sausages?

123sandy

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2013, 10:55:55 AM »
Sausages or sausage meat in pastry are sausage rolls.

Sausages wrapped in bacon are called kilted sausages where I come from.

mechtilde

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2013, 11:12:47 AM »
As a child in Lincolnshire it meant sausages wrapped in pancakes, but I've never heard of anyone else outside there calling them that. Now it means sausages wrapped in bacon.
NE England

Hmmmmm

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2013, 11:22:58 AM »
I think that Polish Stuffed cabbage is also sometimes referred to as pigs in a blanket. I learned this as a child when a mom asked if I wanted to stay for dinner because they were having pigs in a blanket. Image my suprise when I was repsented with a plate of stuffed cabbage.

menley

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2013, 11:28:42 AM »
In Texas, "pigs in a blanket" are sausages or hot dogs wrapped in pastry. Some people have started calling them kolaches as well, because Texas has a large Czech population and there are lots of places that also sell pigs in a blanket as "sausage kolaches", even though they don't meet the traditional definition of kolaches.

BigBadBetty

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2013, 01:28:21 PM »
I am in the Midwest U.S. I always think of hot dogs or canned sausages wrapped in dough...specifically canned Pillsbury crescent dough. Now, I am curious if other countries have canned dough. I think you have to grow up eating it to like it. My mom cooked a lot from scratch so I always found canned dough to taste weird. However, I've always loved opening the can.

baritone108

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2013, 04:26:55 PM »
When I was growing up pigs in blankets were stuffed cabbages.  That was a middle european term.  However, many restaurants here in the USA refer to breakfast sausages wrapped in pancakes as pigs in blankets.

Iris

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2013, 05:28:41 PM »
Where I lived "pigs in blankets" were a children's food and consisted of mashed potato wrapped in a slice of devon. Delicious for me as a child.
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Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

katycoo

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2013, 06:42:24 PM »
Pigs in blankets are cocktail frankfurts wrapped in a square of puff pastry.  And delicious.

Mashed potato in devon is also delivious but not called that ehre - in fact I'm not sure it has a name?

cabbageweevil

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2013, 07:03:35 PM »
As a child in Lincolnshire it meant sausages wrapped in pancakes, but I've never heard of anyone else outside there calling them that. Now it means sausages wrapped in bacon.

My childhood was in Lincolnshire, but as it happened I never encountered PIB = sausages wrapped in pancakes -- can believe it, though: per folk from the rest of England, Lincolnshire is a strange place !  As things fell out, I heard the expression "pigs in blankets" for the first time, only ten years ago -- sausages wrapped in bacon -- heard same, some way north in England, but on the west side.

Sharnita

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2013, 08:20:58 PM »
In our family it was stuffed cabbage.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2013, 11:49:05 PM »
Here it's some kind of sausage wrapped in dough.  Always savory, never sweet

Bluenomi

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2013, 01:22:56 AM »
Sausages (usually little pork breakfast ones) wrapped in bacon to this Aussie.

Pen^2

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2013, 03:32:27 AM »
To this Aussie, a pig in a blanket is a sausage (any kind, not necessarily pork) cooked on a BBQ and then laid diagonally on a slice of bread, as a sort of sausage-holder so you won't need a plate. Usually smothered in sauce, depending on the preferences of the person eating it.

I guess it can be a sausage wrapped in anything, although until this thread I'd never really thought about it. Wrapped in bacon is a great idea.

Flibbertigibbet

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Re: Pigs in Blankets
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2013, 07:09:18 AM »
Uk here (SE if that helps!) - (small) sausages wrapped in bacon are pigs in blankets and (small or big!) sausages in pastry are sausage rolls.

I've also heard the sausages wrapped in bacon called devils horsebank (though that also seems to refer to prunes or dates wrapped in bacon too).

I don't think we have a name for sausages wrapped in bread - other than a sausage sandwich (which for some reason in my head means that the sausage MUST be sliced and not whole ;). Ketchup discretionary ;)

I see some US ehellions refer to 'breakfast sausage': it may just be me, but I don't think we have that term in the UK. What's the difference between a breakfast sausage and just a sausage? Is it that sausages (general term) refer to what we would almost exclusively refer to as a hotdog/saveloy type sausage?