Poll

Q1: What is your opinion of return address labels on Christmas cards? Q2: What do you think the minimum amount of hand-written text inside a card should be?

They're fine
122 (46.9%)
I don't love them, but I don't hate them
5 (1.9%)
They're tacky
1 (0.4%)
Other
2 (0.8%)
Just a signed name(s)
53 (20.4%)
A sentence, plus signed name(s)
55 (21.2%)
A paragraph (i.e. 3+ sentences), plus signed name(s)
5 (1.9%)
More than a paragraph, plus signed name(s)
1 (0.4%)
Other
16 (6.2%)

Total Members Voted: 133

Author Topic: Christmas Card Etiquette  (Read 3186 times)

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CakeEater

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2013, 03:56:04 AM »
TootsNYC, what do you do with the points?  ;)


People can redeem them for hugs, when I do finally see them.
And since a Christmas card is 5 points to start w/ it's rare that anybody's has a deficit.

If they do, then -they- have to hug -me-.

I giggled reading your first post. I was picturing you waiting until Christmas morning and being more excited about contacting the winner of the Christmas card points than about opening your gifts from Santa.

I only send about 5 or 6 cards, so I try to write a paragraph or so. I quite like the family newsletter, or a picture.

A card with just a signature isn't my favourite, but I use them for decorating, so I'm still happy to get it.

Margo

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: December 12, 2013, 05:07:08 AM »
I have no issue at all with return address labels. It's not standard to have the sender's address on the envelope at all, here (England) but I know it is elsewhere and I have labels I will use on anything going overseas. If I'm sending a card to someone in this country I will only put a return address label on if I think they may not have my address or if I'm uncertain of theirs (at least that way, if I have their address wrong the cad may bounce back and I'll *know* I have it wrong!)

It would be nice if you gave me some clue as to who the card is from, though.  I have recieved a card from (I'm pretty sure) the same person for the past three years. It has nothing inside other than a signature which is illegible. I'm pretty sure it starts with either an 'N' or and 'M'. There's nothing else in the card, no return address. I have absolutely no clue who it is from.

For me personally, it's easier to handwrite the mailing address than to try to work out how to print lots f different addresses but if you are organised enough to print labels I don't care in the slightest. (FWIW, I would also not care if the card/letter was a Wedding invitation - of course if you have the skills to address your invitations with beautiful calligraphy I shall be very impressed, but to me, the reason to have the address on the outside of the envelope is so the Post Office knows where to deliver the letter - having typed or mass-produced stuff **inside** is different)

In terms of what goes in the card, that depends entirely on my relationship with you.

People like my parents and brother, who I shall be spending christmas with, I will probably just write 'love from M', and expect the same from them. People I'm close to but am not going to see I'll add a bit more - but not a lot, as they tend to be people who I speak/write to fairly frequently so there isn't much catching up needed.

others may get anything from just their names, and my signature to a full letter, depending on our normal interactions.

I haven't ever sent a 'round robin' letter, I  don't mind getting them (I tend to start with the assumption that if you are sending me a card it's a gesture of good will and an expression of intent for us to continue to be friends - I'm not going to worry to much about exactly what's in it) but that said, I find most round robin letters are either full of 'news' I already know, because I'm in close enough contact that I knew your niece got married (she is my sister, after all!) or that you had a lovely week at the seaside (you sent me a post card) or else we are sufficiently distant that the information isn't very interesting. If you're sending a round robin letter I do think it is best if you at least personalise it by handwriting my name at the top, and perhaps having a one line, personalised comment at the end, because it feels so impersonal otherwise, but mostly I take the will for the deed and assume you mean well.



TootsNYC

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2013, 09:02:35 AM »
Quote
People like my parents and brother, who I shall be spending christmas with, I will probably just write 'love from M', and expect the same from them.

I actually never send those people cards. I figure the Christmas card is a substitute for being able to say "Merry Christmas" in person or by phone. It always feels weird to get a Christmas card from my ILs, because we spend the whole day at their house. And we speak to them frequently during the week.
   It also feels weird to get a Christmas card from my own parents, because I call them for a long chat at Christmas, and speak to them frequently.

Dindrane

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2013, 09:12:48 AM »
I think I've decided I don't much care for photo cards that are 100% mass produced. My brother sent some out last year, but it was sort of half Christmas card, half birth announcement for my nephew (who was born in early December). Since I feel like I can never have too many pictures of my niece and nephew, I didn't really think much about it.

I got a card from one of my cousins this year that had photos and "Merry Christmas" printed on glossy paper (both sides). It's a nice card, but there was nothing other than the envelope that identified it as specifically to me. Granted, the paper (and the fact that it was mostly red on both sides) precluded any hand-written note, since only a a Sharpie would have worked and even that wouldn't have shown up all that well.

Plus, this particular cousin has something of a side business designing stationery (and she has a Facebook page for it that she suggested I and probably everyone else she knows should follow). Her Christmas cards had her logo from that as one of the more prominent items on the back, so it almost felt like an advertisement as much as well-wishes for the season. Even though she probably took a lot more time designing her own cards than the average person spends picking some out to purchase, I don't really see it as extra effort for my (the recipient's) benefit. Spending the time to design the cards was something she did because she enjoys it, so it's roughly equivalent to me spending 20 minutes picking out cards to buy in Target in terms of effort.

That there was then nothing personalized about it doesn't completely negate the "oh, that's nice" feeling from getting the card, but it sure does detract from it. I stuck the card up on my fridge anyway, but it does serve as a cautionary tale for me, just a little. :) I wanted to design my own Christmas cards this year, but decided I didn't have enough time to do a good job of it. I will likely continue working on what I started for next year, though, so it's good for me to remind myself that whatever card I come up with should not make a short personalized note impossible, because I'll still need to write one.


Margo

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2013, 09:34:51 AM »
Quote
People like my parents and brother, who I shall be spending christmas with, I will probably just write 'love from M', and expect the same from them.

I actually never send those people cards. I figure the Christmas card is a substitute for being able to say "Merry Christmas" in person or by phone. It always feels weird to get a Christmas card from my ILs, because we spend the whole day at their house. And we speak to them frequently during the week.
   It also feels weird to get a Christmas card from my own parents, because I call them for a long chat at Christmas, and speak to them frequently.

I don't see cards as a substitute for speaking in person, I see them more of an add-on - most of the people I'm close enough to do both for are people who I know will like to get the card.

However, I don't send cards to people I see every day, so I don't distribute cards to my co-workers, for instance, and didn't give cards to my parents the year I was living back at their home when I moved jobs.

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2013, 02:05:02 PM »
Did anyone else notice that the option Other was there twice?  I clicked both of them.

I don't do cards.  I did them one year, when I first moved away from home, but I was poor as a church mouse and it was WAY too much of my budget, so I gave up.  I get the occasional card, but I never reciprocate. 
Honestly, nobody cares how I'm doing anyway. In my family, you're only important if you're married and have children, and I have neither.  My friends are busy with their own lives.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2013, 02:23:54 PM »
For the most part, I don't pay much attention to labels on my envelopes. Oh look it has my name I can open it, yay! Is my entire thought process. I like more then "Love the Smiths", just a little something, from people I know on a personal level. For business people a signature is fine.

We've made our list, checked it twice, realzied everyone was naughty, and are going to send them cards anyways. We'll be writing them out tomorrow and sending them this weekend. We are sending out 83 cards between the two of us. 83! And that's after a few cuts!

We print addresses on the envelopes themselves, I've had a few labels peel up on me so this way I know it's on there! And I still don't have to hand write 83 addresses. And we have return address labels all done up and ready to be slapped on.

What we write inside depends on who gets it. I send mine to companies I've worked with, clients I work with, and then friends/family. Companies usually get a sentence or two about how great it was to work with them and how I look forward to working with them in the new year, and I usually only sign my name. Then clients get a little more, great working with you, have a happy whatever doesn't offend you, and depending on the client I sign both our names (our family to yours) or just my name. Then friends/family get the paragraph long, you're important and mean a lot to me, we love you, inscriptions, with both our names signed.

citadelle

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #37 on: December 12, 2013, 07:43:26 PM »
Did anyone else notice that the option Other was there twice?  I clicked both of them.

I don't do cards.  I did them one year, when I first moved away from home, but I was poor as a church mouse and it was WAY too much of my budget, so I gave up.  I get the occasional card, but I never reciprocate. 
Honestly, nobody cares how I'm doing anyway. In my family, you're only important if you're married and have children, and I have neither.  My friends are busy with their own lives.

Re: the bolded, I assumed that was bc there were two questions asked, and you might want to respond "other" to both of them.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #38 on: December 12, 2013, 08:49:52 PM »
The rest of my cards are done.  I used return address labels, wrote the address on the envelope, signed my name and tried to write a sentence or two in each one.

And now I have herpes...  of the craft world, that is.  I'm never buying glitter cards again!
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Library Dragon

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Re: Christmas Card Etiquette
« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2013, 01:22:43 AM »
The best Christmas photo cards we've received were from an Army friend. When she was working on her doctorate in neurological pharmacology she had a picture of her and her rats with Santa hats on.  The Christmas before her deployment for Dessert Storm in the photo she opened a big box from Santa with gas mask and bio-chemical suit.  So funny and so her. 

Give me some personality in Christmas photos! 

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