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What's cider?

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Another Sarah:
I just read a post on here where the poster was advising the OP to bring a non-alcoholic drink as a gift, then suggested sparkling cider.

Being from the UK I've only ever heard of cider referred to as a drink that can be still or sparkling, but is made from fermenting the fruit (apples usually) to make it alcoholic, so I'm guessing it means something else across the pond and I'm curious.

What classes as cider?

123sandy:
I think it's a sparkling apple drink. I did see packets to make hot cider too, though...

Jones:
In America, "hard cider" is the alcoholic stuff, "regular" or "sparkling cider" is non alcoholic.

veryfluffy:
Americans ought to be a bit careful if they order it in a pub over here (UK) then -- cider usually ranges from 4% to as much as 8% alcohol. I don't think there is such a thing as non-alcoholic cider. How is it different from apple juice? Or is it like Appletise?

dawbs:

--- Quote from: veryfluffy on December 12, 2013, 09:19:37 AM ---Americans ought to be a bit careful if they order it in a pub over here (UK) then -- cider usually ranges from 4% to as much as 8% alcohol. I don't think there is such a thing as non-alcoholic cider. How is it different from apple juice? Or is it like Appletise?

--- End quote ---

It's definately different than juice (although people will try to convince you it's not on occasion).
It's not filtered/strained (may or may not be pasturized) .
Cider is opaque and goes 'bad' (or good, if you're trying for ahrd cider) rather quickly.
I think there's a vast difference in taste (which is less true for 'cheap' cider)
(and this is highly regional in the US.  In some states, there's legally a difference between cider and juice...in others, they're interchangeable)

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