Author Topic: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?  (Read 71170 times)

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Maxiestar

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #240 on: December 29, 2013, 07:45:53 PM »
There's one here locally that I'm curious about. I'd like to know what happened to Susan Kirby. She has been missing for about a decade or so. Her husband was/is? a prime suspect in her disappearance.

misha412

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #241 on: December 29, 2013, 08:12:49 PM »
Where did my maternal great-grandfather come from?  In a couple of years of searching I've found nothing on him except that he was born in 1875 in Indiana.  His name was Paris Taylor, so he shouldn't have been that hard to trace, but I can find no trace of him.  All the rest of my family lineage is fairly well documented.  Makes me wonder if he was one of these people who disappeared from one place and reappeared in another with a new name.

*There is a family rumor that he'd had to change his name and flee because he made the wrong people angry at him.  However, there's nothing to substantiate this except for what my cousin told me Grandma told her years ago.

I have a couple of those family mysteries myself. I have a third-great grandmother who had four children between 1856 and 1872 without apparently ever being married and while living in her parents' home. Who was the kids' father(s)? The other one is a great-grandfathre who appeared shortly before he married my great-grandmother and disappeared shortly after the birth of their daughter, my grandmother. I have some information on who he might be, but I need to confirm it.

As to the more famous mysteries, I have quite a few I want to know about.

Was the death of William Rufus, King of England, an accident as it was said or an assasination by his brother, Henry?
Who was Jack the Ripper?
What ever happened to the Lost Princes?
What happened to the people of Roanoke?
Does the Bigfoot really exist or not?
Is Loch Ness home to Nessie?
Who was the Zodiac killer?


Dr. F.

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #242 on: December 29, 2013, 08:22:18 PM »
Another one-

I was about 10(?), and was in a summer program at a local natural history museum. All of a sudden, we all got tossed out of classes and I got picked up by the mother of a friend. I remember friend's mom calling mine (mine was at work) and letter her know that she (friend's mom) had picked up my sister and myself. Mom left work early and came and picked us up. We went back to classes a day or so later. I had no clue what was going on.

I found out some time later that one of our instructors (I was in a class with her!) was found naked, raped, and murdered on the pathway leading to the museum. I've occasionally searched for the details of this, to try to see if it was ever solved, but haven't ever found it online. I don't remember being upset about it at the time, but I was too young (and got too few details) to really understand what was happening.

It's been at the back of my mind ever since.

ddawn23

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #243 on: December 30, 2013, 05:22:14 AM »
I know I'm late to the party, but here goes...
Quote
What happened on the Marie Celeste.
I was going to post this one.  I'm fascinated by people who disappear from places as entire ships and towns, yet everything look in place (food on the table, laundry getting ready to wash, etc.)
1) Story elements such as food being laid out on the table and the ship sailing itself into the harbor were inventions of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Even the appellation of "Marie" instead of "Mary" Celeste was Doyle's doing.

2) The Bell Witch: About 99% of the popular legend of the Bell Witch came from a book by a guy named Martin Ingram.  His claimed sources--the diary of one of the Bell sons and some newspaper articles-- have been shown never to have existed.

As for Amelia Earhart, a female skeleton of the right size, plus debris including a navigation system idential to the one she was known to have been using were all found on a pacific island, near her expected route.

Weirdly, this was all found in 1940, but I guess the myth had become much more interesting than any explanation could ever be, so nobody gets told that part. ;D
3) Unfortunately, none of that is true.  The skeleton was male.  The navigation system found near the skeleton was an empty wooden box that somebody said must have been the box Noonan kept his sextant in before actual examination of it revealed it was almost certainly not a sextant box (and even if it was there's no reason to believe it was his sextant box).  And the island the skeleton and box were found on was nowhere near their expected route.  There's really no way they could have made as huge a navigational error as would be necessary for them to end up there.

4) Re the Dyatlov Pass victim with no tongue: It was several weeks before the bodies were found-- ample time for (nonfictional) wild predators to have scavenged the bodies.

What really happened to the Russian royal family? I know that all their remains have now been found, but there was clearly enough doubt and uncertainty over their deaths to inspire stories of Anastasia having survived. We studied the Russian revolution in secondary school (admittedly a while ago) and I remember there were several conflicting accounts of the events.
5) The isolationist bent of the Soviet Union is the main reason conflicting stories were able to circulate for so long.  People have been allowed to actually investigate since the Soviet Union fell, and forensic evidence in the past ten or so years has confirmed the account of the officer in charge of the massacre.  The entire family plus a couple of maids were killed in the basement of the house where they were being held.  The bodies were mutilated to keep them from being identified and buried in two graves.

6) The Min Min Lights are a superior mirage.

lady_disdain

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #244 on: December 30, 2013, 09:03:42 AM »
What really happened to the Russian royal family? I know that all their remains have now been found, but there was clearly enough doubt and uncertainty over their deaths to inspire stories of Anastasia having survived. We studied the Russian revolution in secondary school (admittedly a while ago) and I remember there were several conflicting accounts of the events.
5) The isolationist bent of the Soviet Union is the main reason conflicting stories were able to circulate for so long.  People have been allowed to actually investigate since the Soviet Union fell, and forensic evidence in the past ten or so years has confirmed the account of the officer in charge of the massacre.  The entire family plus a couple of maids were killed in the basement of the house where they were being held.  The bodies were mutilated to keep them from being identified and buried in two graves.

Besides, anytime a tragedy happens in an important family, pretenders show up claiming to be the lost son/daughter/heir. Marie-Therese had to deal with a lot of young men claiming to be her dead brother, Louis XVII (the dauphin).

Midge

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #245 on: December 30, 2013, 10:25:10 AM »

And apparently there is a "missing" toddler on my paternal grandmother's side of the family, as well.  They left Germany on the ship with a little girl and got to Texas about a year later (1890 or so) with the rest of the kids - but not that one little girl.  Her name is no longer mentioned, there's nothing in the surviving family Bible...and the missing aunt is never referred to, apparently.  Since the surviving family members would have been the two generations younger - there is no one to ask who might have a clue. 

My theory is that she might have been ill on the trip and either got sent back to Germany to live with an older sibling or two who remained there *OR* (most likely) she didn't survive but they couldn't record it in the family Bible while traveling because it was packed away.  Then it just hurt too much to think about her...when they finally got to Texas to settle.

I have a missing great uncle as well. My grandmother, her parents, and her younger brother all came to the US from Poland in 1906, when my grandmother was 6 and her brother just a baby. It was said that they left another son in Poland. My grandmother never talked about him, and as she got older she couldn't even remember his name. I always figured he was older when they immigrated, like a teenager at least, and just didn't want to come over. But a few years before she began her decline into Alzheimer's, my mom (who was my grandmother's daughter in law and had been in the family for so long), said that no, he had just been a little kid.  I wonder why they left him there, and what became of him.

Josiepug

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #246 on: December 30, 2013, 10:59:02 AM »
I would like to know who the Phantom Killer was. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texarkana_Moonlight_Murders

Texarkana is only about an hour from where I live so it's sort of a local lore thing for me.

kherbert05

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #247 on: December 30, 2013, 11:16:24 AM »

And apparently there is a "missing" toddler on my paternal grandmother's side of the family, as well.  They left Germany on the ship with a little girl and got to Texas about a year later (1890 or so) with the rest of the kids - but not that one little girl.  Her name is no longer mentioned, there's nothing in the surviving family Bible...and the missing aunt is never referred to, apparently.  Since the surviving family members would have been the two generations younger - there is no one to ask who might have a clue. 

My theory is that she might have been ill on the trip and either got sent back to Germany to live with an older sibling or two who remained there *OR* (most likely) she didn't survive but they couldn't record it in the family Bible while traveling because it was packed away.  Then it just hurt too much to think about her...when they finally got to Texas to settle.

I have a missing great uncle as well. My grandmother, her parents, and her younger brother all came to the US from Poland in 1906, when my grandmother was 6 and her brother just a baby. It was said that they left another son in Poland. My grandmother never talked about him, and as she got older she couldn't even remember his name. I always figured he was older when they immigrated, like a teenager at least, and just didn't want to come over. But a few years before she began her decline into Alzheimer's, my mom (who was my grandmother's daughter in law and had been in the family for so long), said that no, he had just been a little kid.  I wonder why they left him there, and what became of him.
Maybe the child was in poor health and they felt like he wouldn't survive the trip. I've heard a couple of stories like that about distant relatives and neighbors of my Mom's family. Sometimes the child came later, sometimes the child passed, other times they just lost contact.

One of mine is were the Fighting Sulivans from WWII really relatives of my maternal Grandfather's family or did my great-aunt just claim a connection from the same last name.
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Midge

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #248 on: December 30, 2013, 11:52:29 AM »

And apparently there is a "missing" toddler on my paternal grandmother's side of the family, as well.  They left Germany on the ship with a little girl and got to Texas about a year later (1890 or so) with the rest of the kids - but not that one little girl.  Her name is no longer mentioned, there's nothing in the surviving family Bible...and the missing aunt is never referred to, apparently.  Since the surviving family members would have been the two generations younger - there is no one to ask who might have a clue. 

My theory is that she might have been ill on the trip and either got sent back to Germany to live with an older sibling or two who remained there *OR* (most likely) she didn't survive but they couldn't record it in the family Bible while traveling because it was packed away.  Then it just hurt too much to think about her...when they finally got to Texas to settle.

I have a missing great uncle as well. My grandmother, her parents, and her younger brother all came to the US from Poland in 1906, when my grandmother was 6 and her brother just a baby. It was said that they left another son in Poland. My grandmother never talked about him, and as she got older she couldn't even remember his name. I always figured he was older when they immigrated, like a teenager at least, and just didn't want to come over. But a few years before she began her decline into Alzheimer's, my mom (who was my grandmother's daughter in law and had been in the family for so long), said that no, he had just been a little kid.  I wonder why they left him there, and what became of him.
Maybe the child was in poor health and they felt like he wouldn't survive the trip. I've heard a couple of stories like that about distant relatives and neighbors of my Mom's family. Sometimes the child came later, sometimes the child passed, other times they just lost contact.


Well, yes, that's what I'd like to know.

VorFemme

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #249 on: December 30, 2013, 02:45:06 PM »

And apparently there is a "missing" toddler on my paternal grandmother's side of the family, as well.  They left Germany on the ship with a little girl and got to Texas about a year later (1890 or so) with the rest of the kids - but not that one little girl.  Her name is no longer mentioned, there's nothing in the surviving family Bible...and the missing aunt is never referred to, apparently.  Since the surviving family members would have been the two generations younger - there is no one to ask who might have a clue. 

My theory is that she might have been ill on the trip and either got sent back to Germany to live with an older sibling or two who remained there *OR* (most likely) she didn't survive but they couldn't record it in the family Bible while traveling because it was packed away.  Then it just hurt too much to think about her...when they finally got to Texas to settle.

I have a missing great uncle as well. My grandmother, her parents, and her younger brother all came to the US from Poland in 1906, when my grandmother was 6 and her brother just a baby. It was said that they left another son in Poland. My grandmother never talked about him, and as she got older she couldn't even remember his name. I always figured he was older when they immigrated, like a teenager at least, and just didn't want to come over. But a few years before she began her decline into Alzheimer's, my mom (who was my grandmother's daughter in law and had been in the family for so long), said that no, he had just been a little kid.  I wonder why they left him there, and what became of him.
Maybe the child was in poor health and they felt like he wouldn't survive the trip. I've heard a couple of stories like that about distant relatives and neighbors of my Mom's family. Sometimes the child came later, sometimes the child passed, other times they just lost contact.

One of mine is were the Fighting Sulivans from WWII really relatives of my maternal Grandfather's family or did my great-aunt just claim a connection from the same last name.

People who were sick were kept at Ellis Island to recover or sent back to their point of origin.  Sometimes the "sickness" might have been as minor as inflamed eyes, sometimes it was as major as tuberculosis.  But the idea was to avoid having really sick people enter the country and then spreading disease or having to be supported by charities.

There was an informative exhibit about the Galveston Island port of entry at the Houston Museum of Natural Science & History a few years ago - some of the surviving doctor's notes indicate that  some people tried to hide being sick so that they could stay with the rest of the family (who had "passed" the inspections) and some died of their illness while in "quarantine". 

Missing children might have been sent back to live with family members "in the old country" because they didn't pass the health inspection.
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Elfmama

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #250 on: December 30, 2013, 05:20:01 PM »

And apparently there is a "missing" toddler on my paternal grandmother's side of the family, as well.  They left Germany on the ship with a little girl and got to Texas about a year later (1890 or so) with the rest of the kids - but not that one little girl.  Her name is no longer mentioned, there's nothing in the surviving family Bible...and the missing aunt is never referred to, apparently.  Since the surviving family members would have been the two generations younger - there is no one to ask who might have a clue. 

My theory is that she might have been ill on the trip and either got sent back to Germany to live with an older sibling or two who remained there *OR* (most likely) she didn't survive but they couldn't record it in the family Bible while traveling because it was packed away.  Then it just hurt too much to think about her...when they finally got to Texas to settle.

I have a missing great uncle as well. My grandmother, her parents, and her younger brother all came to the US from Poland in 1906, when my grandmother was 6 and her brother just a baby. It was said that they left another son in Poland. My grandmother never talked about him, and as she got older she couldn't even remember his name. I always figured he was older when they immigrated, like a teenager at least, and just didn't want to come over. But a few years before she began her decline into Alzheimer's, my mom (who was my grandmother's daughter in law and had been in the family for so long), said that no, he had just been a little kid.  I wonder why they left him there, and what became of him.
Immigrants in that era had to pass health inspections once they got to the US.  There were a number of conditions that would result in the immigrant being denied entry.  The only thing I remember was TB, but there were others.  Which would you rather do with a child that you were pretty sure couldn't pass a health inspection -- leave him in the Old Country with family, or chance having him be denied and sent back to the Old Country alone?
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Brisvegasgal

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #251 on: December 30, 2013, 07:07:32 PM »
Not a mystery per se but I would like to know if John Wilkes Booth thought he would get caught straight away so didn't have a better escape route planned. Or did he think he could jump over the balcony without hurting himself?

He is 'one of the people I'd like to meet' just so I can ask that question.

Asharah

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #252 on: December 30, 2013, 08:03:02 PM »
Not a mystery per se but I would like to know if John Wilkes Booth thought he would get caught straight away so didn't have a better escape route planned. Or did he think he could jump over the balcony without hurting himself?

He is 'one of the people I'd like to meet' just so I can ask that question.
I think Wilkes was surprised more southerners didn't help him. He failed to grasp the idea that even if alot of people didn't like Lincoln, they didn't want him dead.
Asharah

AzaleaBloom

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #253 on: December 30, 2013, 09:59:02 PM »
I would guess that John Wilkes Booth intended for the assassination to be a suicide mission.  The fact that he survived probably came as a complete surprise and he had no idea what to do from there.

violinp

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #254 on: December 30, 2013, 10:22:06 PM »
Not a mystery per se but I would like to know if John Wilkes Booth thought he would get caught straight away so didn't have a better escape route planned. Or did he think he could jump over the balcony without hurting himself?

He is 'one of the people I'd like to meet' just so I can ask that question.
I think Wilkes was surprised more southerners didn't help him. He failed to grasp the idea that even if alot of people didn't like Lincoln, they didn't want him dead.

This is pretty much it. He thought he would be welcomed into the South like a hero - not realizing that his actions screwed over the whole South and everyone was furious at him for bringing Northern wrath down on the South.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter