Author Topic: Santa stories  (Read 1754 times)

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Emmy

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Santa stories
« on: December 20, 2013, 03:15:35 PM »
For those who celebrate Christmas (or did so as a child), did you believe in Santa?

If yes, was it a fond memory?  How did you find out Santa wasn't real and how old were you?  How did you feel about parents and other relatives pretending Santa was real?

If not, do you wish you had believed in Santa?  Why did your family choose not to do Santa?

What did you do (or will do) regarding Santa with your children? 

My story:
I did believe in Santa and it was a fond memory for me.  It was a little bit of magic of get excited for Santa and thinking of him coming in our house, filling our stockings, and eating our milk and cookies.  I do remember being nervous at the slight chance I wasn't good enough and would get coal in my stocking.  I officially found out Santa wasn't real by asking my mom at age 10.  I had doubted for years, it didn't make sense that Santa would be at so many malls/stores or that he could visit that many houses at once.  It was very disappointing to me to find out Santa wasn't real because the whole idea of it was so magical.  I didn't resent or distrust my parents for playing alone with Santa because they are generally trustworthy people.  I do remember thinking it was generous they could buy several gifts and let the credit go to Santa.

Although I did enjoy believing in Santa, I will let my DD's know that Santa is pretend.  I still plan to let them participate and enjoy visiting Santa and let them know how the legend got started, but don't want to perpetuate the myth that Santa is a real person who lives at the North Pole with elves and flying reindeer.  The primary reason is I don't want to give them reasons to doubt what they learn about the real Christmas story and Jesus.  I know in this world, it is likely they will find other reasons to question their faith, but I don't want it to be because they doubt their mom and dad's ability to be honest.  After all, if mom and dad told me Santa is real, then what else are they telling me that is not true.

alice

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2013, 03:20:20 PM »
I believed in Santa, but was told the mall Santa's were his helpers.  I was also told that Santa sent mommy and daddy a bill after Christmas to pay for the toys.  That is why I was not able to wish for the moon, and why we had to help out the poor families with toys for tots programs.  I raised my kids that way also.  It never made sense that if Santa was doing all of this for free, that he would skip the poor kids, so the story of paying him helped make that less mean.

cwm

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 03:29:23 PM »
I always believed as a kid. One year when I was about 7 or 8, just old enough to start doubting, we piled into the car one Christmas morning, mom and dad and me and Sis. It was one of the very rare white Christmases, and I looked up on the roof and started screaming. Squirrels had run along the roofline and left what looked from a distance to young eyes to be hoofprints. Sis freaked out, we had "proof" that Santa was real.

Logically, I asked about the sleigh tracks. In the smoothest move he's ever pulled, my dad said that of course the sleigh wouldn't land, it just hovers in the air, so there's no tracks on the roof.

I don't remember when I realized the truth, but I had to keep it alive for my sister and then the younger cousins. While I know that Santa's not real any more, I still pretend. To me, Santa became more of an ideal, the giving spirit, than an actual chubby man in red.

SiotehCat

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2013, 04:20:00 PM »
I never believed in Santa and my parents didn't really do the Santa thing.

My sister, on the other hand, swears on her life that she saw Santa take off. And she was a teenage when she claims that happened. It's obvious that she believes it, even now in her forties.

Jules1980

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2013, 05:47:16 PM »
I don't remember really believing in Santa as a kid, but we do Santa with my kids.  My DD believes in Santa.  She knows that her Uncle plays Santa for local groups to do pictures, so she believes that he is Santa's friend and helps him out with pictures.  LOL.  She also believes that Mommy and Daddy buys the gifts and that her Elf on the Shelf takes them to Santa to wrap and bring back.

Strange, I know, but it works for us.

Thipu1

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 10:48:56 AM »
I believed in Santa but I found out the truth when I started going to school.

My mother would roast the bird on Christmas Eve and Santa was always left a warm turkey sandwich and a bottle of beer.  When I got to school and found all the other kids left Santa milk and cookies, I started to put two and two together.  A warm turkey sandwich with cranberry sauce and mayo was my father's favorite snack.  Yes, he also liked beer.

On the other hand, I had a cousin who was 12 before she admitted to not believing in Santa.  Her stated reason was that she got more presents if her parents thought she still believed.  She finally owned up when her folks were concerned enough about her to consider therapy. 

mbbored

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2013, 01:06:57 PM »
I believed in Santa but I found out the truth when I started going to school.

My mother would roast the bird on Christmas Eve and Santa was always left a warm turkey sandwich and a bottle of beer.  When I got to school and found all the other kids left Santa milk and cookies, I started to put two and two together.  A warm turkey sandwich with cranberry sauce and mayo was my father's favorite snack.  Yes, he also liked beer.

On the other hand, I had a cousin who was 12 before she admitted to not believing in Santa.  Her stated reason was that she got more presents if her parents thought she still believed.  She finally owned up when her folks were concerned enough about her to consider therapy.

We left wine and cheese for Santa, since my dad said he'd want something different after all those milk and cookies.

betty

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2013, 01:27:58 PM »
When my son and his friend were in 4th grade, they were pretty sure that Santa wasn't real, but not positive. So they did what kids of the 21st Century do: they googled "Is Santa real." :)

Jules1980

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2013, 01:44:39 PM »
I believed in Santa but I found out the truth when I started going to school.

My mother would roast the bird on Christmas Eve and Santa was always left a warm turkey sandwich and a bottle of beer.  When I got to school and found all the other kids left Santa milk and cookies, I started to put two and two together.  A warm turkey sandwich with cranberry sauce and mayo was my father's favorite snack.  Yes, he also liked beer.

On the other hand, I had a cousin who was 12 before she admitted to not believing in Santa.  Her stated reason was that she got more presents if her parents thought she still believed.  She finally owned up when her folks were concerned enough about her to consider therapy.

We left wine and cheese for Santa, since my dad said he'd want something different after all those milk and cookies.

DD left a ham sandwich and root beer for Santa one year.  Mommy forgot to get cookies, so Daddy convinced her that he would need some real food for supper after all those cookies.

faithlessone

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2013, 02:27:20 PM »
Santa still gets a glass of the good whiskey and a roast beef sandwich at my house. ;)

I believed in Santa (or Father Christmas), until I was about 6 or 7? I had had my doubts, so I snuck downstairs and caught my Dad in the act of sorting the presents out. I was a little upset, but I still got the presents, so I wasn't that sad!

However, if you ask my Grandmother, I still believe. Yup, even at almost 25 years old. You see, I'm not a mother yet, so obviously I don't need to know that Father Christmas doesn't exist. She apparently "broke the news" to all of her sons soon after their first children were born. :)

jedikaiti

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2013, 02:45:53 PM »
I believed in Santa but I found out the truth when I started going to school.

My mother would roast the bird on Christmas Eve and Santa was always left a warm turkey sandwich and a bottle of beer.  When I got to school and found all the other kids left Santa milk and cookies, I started to put two and two together.  A warm turkey sandwich with cranberry sauce and mayo was my father's favorite snack.  Yes, he also liked beer.

On the other hand, I had a cousin who was 12 before she admitted to not believing in Santa.  Her stated reason was that she got more presents if her parents thought she still believed.  She finally owned up when her folks were concerned enough about her to consider therapy.

We left wine and cheese for Santa, since my dad said he'd want something different after all those milk and cookies.

In my house, Santa always got cookies and Dad's good brandy. Mom and Dad said he would appreciate the brandy to help him warm up after freezing in that open sleigh all night.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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Elisabunny

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2013, 03:04:52 PM »
At our house, Santa gets milk and cookies, and an offer to let the reindeer rest in our barn.  He always takes us up on it, borrowing at least one of our goats for the locals while the reindeer eat their hay.

You must remember this: a ghoti is still a fish...

pearls n purls

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2013, 03:44:27 PM »
Note:  my parents were really bad with child psychology.

I believed in Santa when I was really little.  When I was 5, my parents began to resent the fact that Santa got all the credit so they decided that they would only let me believe one more Christmas.  So, knowing that it would be the last Christmas for believing in Santa, they totally built Santa up and everything was Santa, Santa, Santa.  And then some time after Christmas, my mom kind of laughed and told me that they were Santa.  I was quite upset because I hadn't even begun to question anything.  It still bothers me how they handled it.

I now have a baby just under a year.  I will do stockings plus another gift or two from Santa, with the rest being from Mom and Dad.  I love the magic of Christmas, so I will do Santa, but will try to keep a balance.


Thipu1

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2013, 04:56:40 PM »
Not really a Santa story but this is along the same line.

I was an early reader and, about the age of five, I started asking questions.  If all the toys were made by elves at the North Pole, why did my gifts have names on them?  The answer I received was that the names were the names of the elves.

Okay.  I could believe  in an elf named 'Mattel', 'Steiff' or 'Hasbro'.  However, an elf named 'Milton Bradley'  or 'Madam Alexander' was a REAL stretch of the imagination.

Jones

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Re: Santa stories
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2013, 06:22:13 PM »
I tear up when I think of Santa. There was the game, yes, in which I knew that he was busy and so kind helpers dressed up as him in the malls, and I knew that he needed the parents to pitch in funds to pay the elves, or buy the things his elves couldn't make (a story of Santa from my grandfather's life, he grew up in the Depression, brought those points to me). But there was the "reality" that really sunk home to my young heart.

When I was very young, maybe 4 or so, a man with a real beard and a real-looking Santa suit (something that looked comfortably worn, not something a mall Santa wears for pictures) came to my house late on Christmas Eve-Eve (the 23rd). He saw me looking at him, I should have been in bed already but wasn't; gave me an orange and told me I'd best go to bed on time the next night! To this day my parents don't know who that guy "really" was, our neighbors didn't have young kids and he didn't visit any of them, but I was convinced for years he was the real thing.

Then there was the year after the first adoption. I was 9 years old. We had done several fund-raisers that year and my parents had taken on some substantial debt. It was the boys' first Christmas, we were determined to make it good but didn't have many funds. Lots of crafts and homemade stuff, in the days leading up to the day. My new brothers were just happy with the huge box of oranges; but my sisters and I knew from past years about all the wrapped gifts and surprises.
A few nights before the Big Night there "arose such a clatter" my Dad sprang to the door and...there were 2 huge black bags of brightly colored packages. He and Mom kept it quiet until Christmas morning when we went into the living room and there was an unexpected pile of presents. Excitement abounded. My parents still don't know who was our Santa that year, either...

After that Christmas and before I was 10 my mom had the talk with me. This went through everything from puberty to the truth of Santa Clause. It was a big night, lots of heavy facts to digest. I did feel a bit miffed that I had defended Santa to non-believing friends and it turned out they were somewhat right, but I didn't feel my parents were liars for it. That could have to do with my mom's explanation.

The tradition of Santa Claus, approximately as told by my mother:
Long ago there was a man named Nicholaus. His parents died and left him money, but he was sad without family of his own. He traveled and became learned, and realized a lot of people didn't have the advantages he did. He began to do things that were small to him, and big to those he gave to. The church named him a saint because of the miracles he performed in people's lives, hence the name Saint Nicholaus. "Santa" means "Saint" in Spanish, and eventually people shortened his name from Nicholaus to Claus.

Anyway, eventually he died, as all men die. But his legacy, those he'd helped without hope of repayment, began to pass on the story and help others. Those others would find out and pass the story on to others.

Now, today, parents give to their children in secret, using the saint's name to keep his memory alive. Some people have the chance to give to others secretly, by taking a name off an angel tree at the store, or contributing to another charity, or giving directly to someone whom we know needs help, as the saint did in his life.  And this is his legacy, that it is better to give than to receive, even if others never find out that you were the giver.