Author Topic: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?  (Read 4365 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10191
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #60 on: February 15, 2014, 08:35:47 PM »
Like the others have said - Holidays are what you make of them.

Someone mentioned that there seemed like schools celebrated fewer holidays.

I'm a public school teacher in Texas. We are by law restricted to 2 class parties a year. I don't remember now if it is federal or state - but it has to do with childhood obesity. It is called the food of minimal nutritional value law.

We have Winter Break and Valentines (Teachers gave the kids an Ice Cream Social This year in 2nd) at my school. One Mom was telling me that her niece and nephew go to in district school and the principal has banned all parties because CRUD MONKEYS! we are losing instructional time. That 1 hour for an ice cream social is going to ruin the children's chances of passing the STAAR NEXT year (they start taking it in 3rd grade).

Thankfully our principal is a reasonable woman, who realizes an hour of fun buys us so much more time because the kids are happy. Honestly I had the kids put their valentines in their table's toy box. Put the schedule on the board, erased each lesson as the day went on - and didn't hear a peep about "when is the party" or "But I want to play because today is the party" They worked hard - everyone got 90 or better on their spelling test, all but 3 got 100 on a math test, the sub in music said they did the best job of everyone all day. They were happy and worked hard - even recopying their final drafts of their how to paper. Principal also plays music every Friday during dismissal you actually see lines of kids and teachers dancing out of the building.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

bopper

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12214
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #61 on: February 16, 2014, 04:59:55 PM »
So many occasions to receive chocolate!!! (except Thanksgiving)
 :) :) :)

Paper Roses

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4785
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #62 on: February 16, 2014, 05:30:06 PM »
So many occasions to receive chocolate!!! (except Thanksgiving)
 :) :) :)

EXCUSE ME?!?!?!?!  Who says you can't get chocolate on Thanksgiving? 

Just kidding, of course - however, there are places around here that sell foil covered chocolate in the shape of turkeys and pilgrims.
No, you can't, because you wishpishabonnyfish.

katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3732
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #63 on: February 16, 2014, 05:32:23 PM »
After reading this thread, it's occurred to me that most of the "celebrating" I do for holidays other than Thanksgiving or Christmas is done at work.

Beyond a festive batch of cookies, which is really just a reason to make more cookies, I don't do anything for the minor holidays. But every place I've worked, someone puts up Valentine's hearts, or green shamrocks, or black cats, or flags and bunting. And frequently, there's a potluck or the company provides a festive snack or two.

Which is fine by me. I don't have to do the work, unless there's a "decorate your cubicles" contest, I get reminded about the holiday, and there's snacks. Which is about the level of energy I feel like using for these holidays.

I think this in itself is a pretty big point of difference.  Its rare for an office to be decorated at all for a holiday, let alone any kind of competition.  Maybe at Christmas, but that's it.

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6609
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #64 on: February 16, 2014, 06:07:55 PM »
So many occasions to receive chocolate!!! (except Thanksgiving)
 :) :) :)

EXCUSE ME?!?!?!?!  Who says you can't get chocolate on Thanksgiving? 

Just kidding, of course - however, there are places around here that sell foil covered chocolate in the shape of turkeys and pilgrims.

When I was a child, Barton's made boxes of small, turkey-shaped dark chocolates filled with orange marmalade.  It spoiled me for the sort of chocolates that young children are supposed to like.   

Seraphia

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1738
  • Unabashed cat person
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #65 on: February 16, 2014, 06:37:24 PM »


Although, when you think about it, A party with everyone in costume has been around for a LONG time.  It is just that now, Halloween is the only time it is acceptable.

True.  Masquerade Balls, Carnevale in Venice.  The costumes may have been mostly really fancy regular clothes with a mask of some sort, but the intent was the same.

That is a good point. Dressing up in costume has been a feature of life for ages all over the world. I have a book on my coffee table about the balls that were thrown in the Gilded Age, and those costumes were of things like Robin Hood and Electricity - not so different from today, except for it not being on a holiday.
Ancora Imparo - I am still learning

dirtyweasel

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1389
  • Just keep swimming, just keep swimming...
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #66 on: February 18, 2014, 06:11:52 AM »
I'm still mad that my birthday isn't a major holiday.  Haha!

Halloween is the best holiday ever though...it's a fun time to watch scary movies and decorate the house in a fun way and watch all the kiddies have a good time Trick or Treating.



camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8504
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #67 on: February 21, 2014, 04:05:22 PM »
I'm still mad that my birthday isn't a major holiday.  Haha!

Halloween is the best holiday ever though...it's a fun time to watch scary movies and decorate the house in a fun way and watch all the kiddies have a good time Trick or Treating.

You should have been born in my family. We have family birthdays on New Years Day, St. Patrick's Day, April Fool's Day, 4th of July, Halloween, Christmas Eve, and every so often, Thanksgiving.

It's not a holiday until there's birthday cake, around here!
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Bethczar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1001
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #68 on: February 21, 2014, 07:02:50 PM »
I'm still mad that my birthday isn't a major holiday.  Haha!

Halloween is the best holiday ever though...it's a fun time to watch scary movies and decorate the house in a fun way and watch all the kiddies have a good time Trick or Treating.

You should have been born in my family. We have family birthdays on New Years Day, St. Patrick's Day, April Fool's Day, 4th of July, Halloween, Christmas Eve, and every so often, Thanksgiving.

It's not a holiday until there's birthday cake, around here!
Ha! We have the same thing, only the occasional Easter instead of New Years. My mom was excited when she finally got a holiday, too - Martin Luther King Day

MurPl1

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 966
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #69 on: February 22, 2014, 02:07:13 AM »
I actually struggle with this and am trying to find ways to cut back each year. We have 2 little kids whose birthdays fall at the beginning of December and the end of January, and my DH's birthday is at the beginning of January, and my Dad's (we are extremely close) is the day after Valentine's Day.

We either travel for Thanksgiving or Christmas, or my inlaw's come.  This year my inlaws came for Thanksgiving and my brother and his family for Christmas. We also observe Advent with additional worship services and events. From October 15-Feb 15, I am just a wreck, and Lent is about to start.

I quit singing in the choir because the extra rehearsals and services were making me an angry crazy woman, and am lobbying hard to convince the kids to celebrate their half-birthdays in the summer when we can turn them out in the backyard in swimsuits.  On the one hand, I love doing all the fun stuff, but on the other it is just too much. It's not that I feel pressured that I am "supposed" to do things, but I do feel internal pressure to not miss out on fun activities, especially stuff to do with the kids.

I'm sure my mom felt the same.  My b-day is 12/19 and brother's is 1/30.  Then as an adult I met DH and my DSD's b-day is 12/8.  It does get a little crazy.  Although we did try to avoid "Christmas" until after her birthday.  Until she and I both realized we love having our birthdays intertwined with all the holiday festiveness.  I joked with a friend's daughter who has a 12/22 birthday that I just take the attitude that all those lights are for me! ;)

MurPl1

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 966
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #70 on: February 22, 2014, 02:09:19 AM »
For someone with kids in elementary school I could see how it might get exhausting, though. At least, when I was a kid, which granted was a generation ago, there did seem to be a lot of in-class parties, coloring holiday pictures, watching holiday movies, providing holiday treats, and getting days off school for fairly obscure holidays. (My favorite was always Casimir Pulaski Day.) Even as a kid it sometimes got to be a little much; I imagine it could seem never-ending to a parent who wasn't that keen on holidays anyway.

Are you in Illinois?  I remember getting to celebrate Casmir Pulaski Day (DH thinks I made that up).  A teacher told us that the state legislators made it a holiday to get the Polish vote since Chicago had the largest Polish population outside of Poland.  I'm not sure how much any of that is true, but we loved the day off :)

magicdomino

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4543
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #71 on: February 22, 2014, 02:09:04 PM »

I'm sure my mom felt the same.  My b-day is 12/19 and brother's is 1/30.  Then as an adult I met DH and my DSD's b-day is 12/8.  It does get a little crazy.  Although we did try to avoid "Christmas" until after her birthday.  Until she and I both realized we love having our birthdays intertwined with all the holiday festiveness.  I joked with a friend's daughter who has a 12/22 birthday that I just take the attitude that all those lights are for me! ;)

A great nephew whose birthday is July 4th is quite pleased that he gets to celebrate with fireworks.

Hmmmmm

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6252
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #72 on: February 22, 2014, 02:14:31 PM »
We have lots of "near" holiday bdays in our family: July 2, February 15, Jan 2, Nov 1, Dec 26. We laugh that we are selfish bunch not wanting to share our days with major holidays.

Lynn2000

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4794
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #73 on: February 23, 2014, 09:16:04 PM »
For someone with kids in elementary school I could see how it might get exhausting, though. At least, when I was a kid, which granted was a generation ago, there did seem to be a lot of in-class parties, coloring holiday pictures, watching holiday movies, providing holiday treats, and getting days off school for fairly obscure holidays. (My favorite was always Casimir Pulaski Day.) Even as a kid it sometimes got to be a little much; I imagine it could seem never-ending to a parent who wasn't that keen on holidays anyway.

Are you in Illinois?  I remember getting to celebrate Casmir Pulaski Day (DH thinks I made that up).  A teacher told us that the state legislators made it a holiday to get the Polish vote since Chicago had the largest Polish population outside of Poland.  I'm not sure how much any of that is true, but we loved the day off :)

Ha ha, yes, when I was in public school. Does any other state have Casimir Pulaski Day?  :D
~Lynn2000