Author Topic: rude to flush in the wee hours? (yes, I see what I did there)possible squick  (Read 9179 times)

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bloo

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

But...but...but the cooties are still in there! What about splashback?  ;D

jedikaiti

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

I've been seeing public toilets with options for #1 and #2 all over the place in CO in the last few years - typically they have a green handle, and indicate up for #1, and down for #2.
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MariaE

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Now the kids are older and it is not a problem anymore. However, two of the kids are going through a weird stage where they refuse to flush after they go. My dear SIL is just hoping they outgrow this soon.

This was me when I was 8-10. I had an irrational fear of intruders and I was certain that if I got up in the middle of the night to go to the loo and flushed afterwards, any eventual intruders would hear and come get me...

I always flushed in the daytime though.

I did have a friend whose parents asked us not to flush during the night when I stayed over, so I didn't. But I would always default to flushing unless specifically told otherwise.
 
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Bluenomi

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

Yvaine

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

I believe we've started to have a few. For a while, a "low-flow" style toilet became popular, which basically meant that every flush was of the "only sufficient for #1" variety. They were meant to conserve water but just ended up annoying people, and probably didn't conserve much because people needed to flush them twice so often.  ;D

bah12

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

I think they exist, but they are not common place where I live...which is a pretty diverse part of the country that has access to quite a lot.  I think we are just behind in catching on to the trend. 

gramma dishes

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I believe we've started to have a few. For a while, a "low-flow" style toilet became popular, which basically meant that every flush was of the "only sufficient for #1" variety. They were meant to conserve water but just ended up annoying people, and probably didn't conserve much because people needed to flush them twice so often.  ;D

That's true.  The general rule is:  If you have a preexisting 'regular' standard one, you can keep it for as long as you can continue to get parts for it and make it work.  But if you were replacing that one, building a new house, or adding a bathroom you had to use the "low flow" variety.  As you said, they used so little water and such a flimsy flush that people ended up having to flush them two or three times to get the contents to disappear.  Hardly a water savings!

Now they have new POWER FLUSH ones that flush with such force and suction that it terrifies children (and unsuspecting adults) because it sounds and feels like it's going to suck down the whole house!  :o

The dual flush variety is showing up more and more in public places such as airports, commuter train stations, shopping malls, etc.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 07:56:38 PM by gramma dishes »

camlan

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In the Philippines I noticed that my relatives all had a hose connected to their toilets  (similar to the spray house on a kitchen sink). Everywhere I went it was expected you would dispose of tp in the trash. But the tp was mostly meant for patting you dry as you'd use the hose to clean yourself.  It in public, it was expected that you would bring tp with you as only upscale places frequented by foreigners might provide tp. Might.

Anyhoo, I guess in those circumstances depositing paper in the garbage wouldn't be too bad. My relatives bathrooms never smelled. We're always expected to flush, however.

When my brother commented on the hoses to my cousin, 'you must think Americans stink,' my cousin grinned and responded,  'we do.

Or' wee doo'  >:D

From what I've read (which isn't very extensive), America and parts of Europe are really the odd ones about toilets. Most places use a bit of water to wash off and cloth or paper to dry. They also squat, which means that there really isn't a whole lot to wash off. Just some stuff I found while researching "family cloth" lol. I know there are lots of people here from all over the world, maybe what I read was way off?

In Japan, my experience with the "western" toilets was that most had two options for the flush.  For just liquids there would be just enough water to dilute and not a full flush...solids a more robust flush.   In Europe (Greece and Turkey specifically) my experience is not with "hoses" but with bidets.  Making TP just used to pat yourself dry. In all cases, I still flushed every time.  Here in the US, I haven't seen the multi-optioned toilet so just use a full-flush every time (because sanitary or not, I still think it's gross not to).  I don't know why we haven't introduced the two-flush option here (at least not in most places) because I think it would go over well for conserving water.

The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

Water conservation is very important in some parts of the US, particularly desert areas and areas where clean water is costly. But mostly, how much water toilets can use is determined by the government.

Years ago, most toilets used about 3.5 gallons (13.2 liters) per flush. Now they use 1.6 gallons (6 liters) or less per flush. So we're working on it.

Dual flush toilets are available here. They are a bit more expensive. And unless you are building a new home or renovating a bathroom, most people just deal with the toilet they get when they buy or rent a new place.

The early low-flow toilets had issues and many required two or more flushes to completely empty the bowl. Now there are pressure assist toilets and other features that make the toilets work better.

I think we have a different type of toilet over here. In a recent thread about toilets, there were certain issues with European style toilets that we don't seem to have, and vice versa.

But just because we don't have a specific type of toilet in every house doesn't mean that there is no concern for water conservation throughout the country.
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meronym

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The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

Water conservation is very important in some parts of the US, particularly desert areas and areas where clean water is costly. But mostly, how much water toilets can use is determined by the government.

Years ago, most toilets used about 3.5 gallons (13.2 liters) per flush. Now they use 1.6 gallons (6 liters) or less per flush. So we're working on it.

Dual flush toilets are available here. They are a bit more expensive. And unless you are building a new home or renovating a bathroom, most people just deal with the toilet they get when they buy or rent a new place.

The early low-flow toilets had issues and many required two or more flushes to completely empty the bowl. Now there are pressure assist toilets and other features that make the toilets work better.

I think we have a different type of toilet over here. In a recent thread about toilets, there were certain issues with European style toilets that we don't seem to have, and vice versa.

But just because we don't have a specific type of toilet in every house doesn't mean that there is no concern for water conservation throughout the country.

Thank you for posting this.

Sweeping generalizations about other countries can't possibly be polite. Keep in mind that the US has a population of 314 million as opposed to Australia's 23 million - things can take a little longer here. And, like others have pointed out, our earlier attempts to regulate water usage wasn't successful - that doesn't mean we don't care.

Harriet Jones

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Over the past few years I've seen more and more dual flush public toilets, which is nice. 

My experience with low-flow toilets in private homes has been uniformly bad, though. Most of them just can't handle solid waste very well. 

EllenS

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Our house was built in the 1950's and looks like it has the original toilet (large tank type). If it has been replaced, it was certainly before 1980. I just did a little research and the estimate is this type uses about 7 gallons per flush.

Renovating the bathroom is not in the budget for several years, so we will continue skipping flushes when it is feasible.

Iris

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The US doesn't have duel flush loos? Wow, you learn something every day. Clearly water conservation isn't as important over there as it is here in Australia, you can only get duel flush here and since the water level in the loo is much lower, even a full flush uses less water. Plus no nasty splash back.

Water conservation is very important in some parts of the US, particularly desert areas and areas where clean water is costly. But mostly, how much water toilets can use is determined by the government.

Years ago, most toilets used about 3.5 gallons (13.2 liters) per flush. Now they use 1.6 gallons (6 liters) or less per flush. So we're working on it.

Dual flush toilets are available here. They are a bit more expensive. And unless you are building a new home or renovating a bathroom, most people just deal with the toilet they get when they buy or rent a new place.

The early low-flow toilets had issues and many required two or more flushes to completely empty the bowl. Now there are pressure assist toilets and other features that make the toilets work better.

I think we have a different type of toilet over here. In a recent thread about toilets, there were certain issues with European style toilets that we don't seem to have, and vice versa.

But just because we don't have a specific type of toilet in every house doesn't mean that there is no concern for water conservation throughout the country.

Thank you for posting this.

Sweeping generalizations about other countries can't possibly be polite. Keep in mind that the US has a population of 314 million as opposed to Australia's 23 million - things can take a little longer here. And, like others have pointed out, our earlier attempts to regulate water usage wasn't successful - that doesn't mean we don't care.

Sorry to go nit-picky, but the phrase was "isn't as important" not "nobody cares". One quick look at the river systems of both countries would make it seem likely that in the country as a whole water conservation probably isn't as big an issue although your increased population would certainly balance that out.

In other words I agree that sweeping generalizations are bad, but I don't think one was made. A comparison is not always a judgement.
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Katana_Geldar

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In Australia, you're more likely to find a dual flush unless you're in an old building or old public toilet. Some of them are better than others.

DH used to have a thing about not flushing during the night and waking me, I said if rather he did wake me and not let it stew.

Minmom3

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Our house was built in the 1950's and looks like it has the original toilet (large tank type). If it has been replaced, it was certainly before 1980. I just did a little research and the estimate is this type uses about 7 gallons per flush.

Renovating the bathroom is not in the budget for several years, so we will continue skipping flushes when it is feasible.

There are things you can do to reduce the water capacity of the tank though.  Maybe research them and see if any of them would work for your toilet? 

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...  Where I live, toilet paper is not flushed, as the plumbing can't handle it, so used TP is deposited in a small can next to the toilet.

This is going to sound like I'm just being obnoxious, but it is a genuine question because I've never been anywhere where you couldn't flush TP down the toilet. 

I get putting it into a container, but seriously, what if someone has screamers or something?  What then?  You couldn't put that in a can.  Even the paper generated by just a couple of people doing a nice normal #2 would smell up the bathroom really fast, wouldn't it? 

Do you carry the container out with you when you leave the bathroom and if so, then what do you do with it?  ???

A lot of marine toilets are like that. The only thing that goes in them is whatever has passed through your body. Paper will cause serious clogs, meaning that some hapless crew member has to take the whole system apart and clean it out. On our boats, there is a trash can in a cabinet right next to the toilet for disposing paper.
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