Author Topic: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?  (Read 12119 times)

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melicious

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #60 on: January 07, 2014, 04:12:07 PM »
It's crazy that in this day and age people don't know how to interview properly. I thought that basic interview etiquette was common knowledge.

I was not taught interviewing skills until college. There were no professional development courses offered in high school. For people who don't go to college (or don't take that elective) who come from families where the parents might not remember interviewing or have never really done it successfully themselves, I am not surprised that many people don't know how it works.

Yeah, through reading this thread I've come to realize that, so I'd like to retract what I said (besides looking back it makes me sound like a super-snob!)

veronaz

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #61 on: January 07, 2014, 04:27:54 PM »
It's crazy that in this day and age people don't know how to interview properly. I thought that basic interview etiquette was common knowledge.
I was not taught interviewing skills until college. There were no professional development courses offered in high school. For people who don't go to college (or don't take that elective) who come from families where the parents might not remember interviewing or have never really done it successfully themselves, I am not surprised that many people don't know how it works.

I donít think itís necessary to go to college in order to learn/know how to dress and apply for and interview for a job.

My first interview was in high school when I signed up to be an office assistant in the principalís office.  It was not a paid job, and we werenít allowed to wear jeans back then, but I didnít need college courses to teach me how to dress, fill out a form, answer questions, and conduct myself.  Iím not bragging; the same applied to all the other students who did this type work.  I also applied, interviewed, and was hired for a job as a store cashier while I was in high school.

When my niece and nephews were in high school (2005 Ė 2011) virtually all of them (perhaps with help from parents) applied, interviewed and were hired for part-time paid jobs.  Two of them were in programs where they were instructed/coached on how to dress and apply/interview for jobs.


« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 04:29:29 PM by veronaz »

Arila

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #62 on: January 07, 2014, 04:34:42 PM »
It's crazy that in this day and age people don't know how to interview properly. I thought that basic interview etiquette was common knowledge.
I was not taught interviewing skills until college. There were no professional development courses offered in high school. For people who don't go to college (or don't take that elective) who come from families where the parents might not remember interviewing or have never really done it successfully themselves, I am not surprised that many people don't know how it works.



I donít think itís necessary to go to college in order to learn/know how to dress and apply for and interview for a job.

My first interview was in high school when I signed up to be an office assistant in the principalís office.  It was not a paid job, and we werenít allowed to wear jeans back then, but I didnít need college courses to teach me how to dress, fill out a form, answer questions, and conduct myself.  Iím not bragging; the same applied to all the other students who did this type work.  I also applied, interviewed, and was hired for a job as a store cashier while I was in high school.

When my niece and nephews were in high school (2005 Ė 2011) virtually all of them (perhaps with help from parents) applied, interviewed and were hired for part-time paid jobs.  Two of them were in programs where they were instructed/coached on how to dress and apply/interview for jobs.

I agree that it is not necessary to go to college to learn this, just pointing out that no one taught *ME* in any way until then. In a school with thousands of kids, only a small percentage of them will be working in the jobs you mentioned. I did get a retail job as a teen, and getting that job was very very different from getting a professional/career job at an office as described in the OP.

Jones

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #63 on: January 07, 2014, 05:37:38 PM »
My worst interview ever, I was a junior in high school (age 16). I needed a job because I came from a large family and would now be responsible for my own school fees and clothing. It was for a part time organization and janitorial work position at a craft and decoration shop. I wore a Sunday dress (slacks and button up would have been better) and I didn't have a list of references (my babysitting families). Oh the awkwardness as I flipped through a phone book writing down names and numbers! I learned from the experience and when I applied for a grocery bagger position around a week later I was hired on the spot, and stayed until well after turning 18.

My high school had a concurrent enrollment program with the community college and I took a Careers 101 class my senior year. Various resume types, practiced giving and receiving an interview, research of our dream jobs and steps necessary to that career. It was an incredibly valuable class.

Library Dragon

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #64 on: January 07, 2014, 09:55:39 PM »
We spent the day interviewing for an entry level position. We advertised that it would be very specific schedule.

One person showed up 40 minutes early for the interview. Okay, misjudged driving time. He confirmed the interview time when asked. The problems were he got snippy that we didn't take him early. I can overlook the tshirt and jeans if they were neat, clean, and not full of holes.

The next was a young woman who immediately presented her class schedule that conflicted with all but one day's hours.  I double checked afterwards. On her application she marked that there were no schedule conflicts.

Then there were the two that didn't other to show up.

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PastryGoddess

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #65 on: January 07, 2014, 10:46:17 PM »
We spent the day interviewing for an entry level position. We advertised that it would be very specific schedule.

One person showed up 40 minutes early for the interview. Okay, misjudged driving time. He confirmed the interview time when asked. The problems were he got snippy that we didn't take him early. I can overlook the tshirt and jeans if they were neat, clean, and not full of holes.

The next was a young woman who immediately presented her class schedule that conflicted with all but one day's hours.  I double checked afterwards. On her application she marked that there were no schedule conflicts.

Then there were the two that didn't other to show up.

*weeps*

I'm scheduling intern and staff position interviews next week.  I'm no longer looking forward to them now

cicero

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #66 on: January 08, 2014, 12:48:00 AM »
My worst interview ever, I was a junior in high school (age 16). I needed a job because I came from a large family and would now be responsible for my own school fees and clothing. It was for a part time organization and janitorial work position at a craft and decoration shop. I wore a Sunday dress (slacks and button up would have been better) and I didn't have a list of references (my babysitting families). Oh the awkwardness as I flipped through a phone book writing down names and numbers! I learned from the experience and when I applied for a grocery bagger position around a week later I was hired on the spot, and stayed until well after turning 18.

My high school had a concurrent enrollment program with the community college and I took a Careers 101 class my senior year. Various resume types, practiced giving and receiving an interview, research of our dream jobs and steps necessary to that career. It was an incredibly valuable class.
So that's the point - we have to be willing and able to be ego-less and learn. To understand that maybe i dont know all. To realuze that the advice i got from school/mom/employment agency was incorrect or irrelavent. It's not even always about doing things *wrong* , but learning for example that there are different work cultures and expectations. So you, at 16 , were able to do that, while we have grownups who can't or won't.

I never took a class in job seeking but was always willing to listen to advice and to read between the lines , so when I was rejected once, twice, thrice, started to revise my tactics.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2014, 12:50:21 AM by cicero »

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DCGirl

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #67 on: January 08, 2014, 01:41:52 PM »
One person showed up 40 minutes early for the interview. Okay, misjudged driving time. He confirmed the interview time when asked. The problems were he got snippy that we didn't take him early.

I tend to be compulsively early, especially for something like a job interview, so you would have found me killing time at the nearest McDonald's or reading a book in my car. 

MrTango

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #68 on: January 08, 2014, 01:50:47 PM »
One person showed up 40 minutes early for the interview. Okay, misjudged driving time. He confirmed the interview time when asked. The problems were he got snippy that we didn't take him early.

I tend to be compulsively early, especially for something like a job interview, so you would have found me killing time at the nearest McDonald's or reading a book in my car.

Me too.  I'll drive to the interview location, and if I'm more than 15 minutes early, I'll find a quiet spot out of sight from the building (around the block, in a store parking lot, or a park) to wait.  I always aim to walk in the door ten minutes early.  That way, I can sit down and calm myself for a bit before going in to the interview.

Hmmmmm

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #69 on: January 08, 2014, 02:00:19 PM »
I never learned, in my high school, undergrad or grad programs, how to dress for an interview, how to write a resume, or how to interview.  I learned how to dress from my mom, how to write a resume from a relative who works in HR, and I still fail miserably at interviewing.  On the other hand, in my 9 years of post-high school classes (4 years for undergrad, 5 years for master's), I've been treated to no less than 13 presentations on how to use library resources.  So maybe there should be a balance - replace some presentations on library use with presentations on finding/getting/keeping a job? ;)

I've never run across a university that didn't have a career center available for students to acquire these skills. My DD is a freshmen this year and we attended tours of over 12 universities, some large and some small private ones, and each talked about their career placement centers that assisted students in acquiring these skills.


Yvaine

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #70 on: January 08, 2014, 02:09:53 PM »
I never learned, in my high school, undergrad or grad programs, how to dress for an interview, how to write a resume, or how to interview.  I learned how to dress from my mom, how to write a resume from a relative who works in HR, and I still fail miserably at interviewing.  On the other hand, in my 9 years of post-high school classes (4 years for undergrad, 5 years for master's), I've been treated to no less than 13 presentations on how to use library resources.  So maybe there should be a balance - replace some presentations on library use with presentations on finding/getting/keeping a job? ;)

I've never run across a university that didn't have a career center available for students to acquire these skills. My DD is a freshmen this year and we attended tours of over 12 universities, some large and some small private ones, and each talked about their career placement centers that assisted students in acquiring these skills.

Though it must be said that Ask a Manager has a whole category of posts tagged "Lies Your Career Center Told You."  ;D Some of them are great, but others dispense outdated or totally wrong-headed advice.

Hillia

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2014, 02:13:14 PM »
I think the idea of teaching 'life skills' such as resume writing, interviewing, etc, is a relatively (like in the last 20-30 years) development.  I graduated in 1980, and unless you were in the DECA program, which was specifically designed to prepare students for work rather than college, there was no mention of it.  I went to 3 different colleges, 1 public and 2 private, and while there was a 'career guidance' office, it was more about coordinating requests from companies looking for graduates in a specific field.  They might have had a few sample resumes, but I think I learned to write one from library books - which were full of bad info, like 'include your height, weight, marital status, health status, and hobbies' and 'always attach a photo'.

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nutraxfornerves

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2014, 02:23:40 PM »
Quote
One person showed up 40 minutes early for the interview. Okay, misjudged driving time. He confirmed the interview time when asked. The problems were he got snippy that we didn't take him early.

I had the opposite occur. It was for a job with a government agency. One woman showed up about a half hour early. The person before her was a no-show, so we asked her if she'd like to do the interview now or at the scheduled time. She chose "now."

When she didn't get the job, she filed a formal complaint that "experts" say you should come early so you can collect yourself and get into the right frame of mind for the interview, but we didn't allow her to do that. The complaint was not upheld.

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Yvaine

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #73 on: January 08, 2014, 02:26:18 PM »
I think the idea of teaching 'life skills' such as resume writing, interviewing, etc, is a relatively (like in the last 20-30 years) development.  I graduated in 1980, and unless you were in the DECA program, which was specifically designed to prepare students for work rather than college, there was no mention of it.  I went to 3 different colleges, 1 public and 2 private, and while there was a 'career guidance' office, it was more about coordinating requests from companies looking for graduates in a specific field.  They might have had a few sample resumes, but I think I learned to write one from library books - which were full of bad info, like 'include your height, weight, marital status, health status, and hobbies' and 'always attach a photo'.

That must have been the book my dad had!  ;D It was in the 1980s too, because that's when he got laid off and completely switched career direction as a result.

Hmmmmm

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #74 on: January 08, 2014, 02:35:12 PM »
I never learned, in my high school, undergrad or grad programs, how to dress for an interview, how to write a resume, or how to interview.  I learned how to dress from my mom, how to write a resume from a relative who works in HR, and I still fail miserably at interviewing.  On the other hand, in my 9 years of post-high school classes (4 years for undergrad, 5 years for master's), I've been treated to no less than 13 presentations on how to use library resources.  So maybe there should be a balance - replace some presentations on library use with presentations on finding/getting/keeping a job? ;)

I've never run across a university that didn't have a career center available for students to acquire these skills. My DD is a freshmen this year and we attended tours of over 12 universities, some large and some small private ones, and each talked about their career placement centers that assisted students in acquiring these skills.

Though it must be said that Ask a Manager has a whole category of posts tagged "Lies Your Career Center Told You."  ;D Some of them are great, but others dispense outdated or totally wrong-headed advice.

I took a look and there were only 7 entries with that tag over the last 5.5 years so maybe the majority aren't so bad.