Author Topic: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?  (Read 14010 times)

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tinkytinky

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #90 on: January 09, 2014, 09:30:58 AM »
I did an online interview with someone once, and this guy was one of our top candidates for several slots.  I and the other two women doing the interview with me all thought that his application was stellar, his first, brief interview had been wonderful, and that he was what we were looking for. 

We met up in a chat room (this was before Skype, etc.) so we could all talk--or type, since it was online.  (The position was online, thus, interviewing online to see how he read.)

About five minutes into the interview, he interrupted what I was typing to blurt out that this was the first time he'd ever done an interview naked.

Yeah.  That ended *that* real quick.

Maybe he thought he was interviewing for a nudist resort and he was trying to (un)dress appropriately....

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Hmmmmm

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #91 on: January 09, 2014, 10:00:37 AM »
I remember this from the 80s.  Resumes has marital status, hobbies, and lots of other non-essential information.  I was told it was to make us look like an individual with an interesting life.   ::)

In some cultures this information is still standard on resumes. It's  suprising at times to be interviewing for one of my international positions and receive resumes that state all of that and even religious affiliations.

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #92 on: January 09, 2014, 10:20:07 AM »
I remember this from the 80s.  Resumes has marital status, hobbies, and lots of other non-essential information.  I was told it was to make us look like an individual with an interesting life.   ::)

In some cultures this information is still standard on resumes. It's  suprising at times to be interviewing for one of my international positions and receive resumes that state all of that and even religious affiliations.

I've just had this conversation with the Elder Chick. When I was applying for jobs, back in the Pleistocene, we were encouraged to show off soft skills, hobbies etc, and to make ourselves look 'well-rounded' and socially competent). The Chick had to explain to me in small words that my advice and experience was irrelevant to him, because he's looking for jobs in the gaming end of the computer industry which simply didn't exist when I was 20. Apparently one of the big employers explained very clearly to them in an employment seminar that the things we were encouraged to do to show team-playerness, like the Duke of Edinburgh's Award scheme, and Outward Bound courses, will actually count against applicants in that sector now. If you've been rollerskating up Annapurna or kayaking across the Gobi Desert, even if it was to raise money for orphaned tadpoles, it means that you haven't been devoting your time to keeping up with changes in online gaming. If you're a regular Gobi Kayaker, that's even worse because it means that you aren't just taking 6 weeks to do something you fancy doing once, you're going to be spending a lot of time on something that has no bearing whatsoever on your career. They're not saying that you should be thinking of work 24/7, but they aren't interested in somebody who'll be a 9-5 worker because he has another major interest. 

Hmmmmm

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #93 on: January 09, 2014, 10:30:58 AM »
I remember this from the 80s.  Resumes has marital status, hobbies, and lots of other non-essential information.  I was told it was to make us look like an individual with an interesting life.   ::)

In some cultures this information is still standard on resumes. It's  suprising at times to be interviewing for one of my international positions and receive resumes that state all of that and even religious affiliations.

I've just had this conversation with the Elder Chick. When I was applying for jobs, back in the Pleistocene, we were encouraged to show off soft skills, hobbies etc, and to make ourselves look 'well-rounded' and socially competent). The Chick had to explain to me in small words that my advice and experience was irrelevant to him, because he's looking for jobs in the gaming end of the computer industry which simply didn't exist when I was 20. Apparently one of the big employers explained very clearly to them in an employment seminar that the things we were encouraged to do to show team-playerness, like the Duke of Edinburgh's Award scheme, and Outward Bound courses, will actually count against applicants in that sector now. If you've been rollerskating up Annapurna or kayaking across the Gobi Desert, even if it was to raise money for orphaned tadpoles, it means that you haven't been devoting your time to keeping up with changes in online gaming. If you're a regular Gobi Kayaker, that's even worse because it means that you aren't just taking 6 weeks to do something you fancy doing once, you're going to be spending a lot of time on something that has no bearing whatsoever on your career. They're not saying that you should be thinking of work 24/7, but they aren't interested in somebody who'll be a 9-5 worker because he has another major interest.

And this is why it is so important to get resume and interview advice from people who currently works and hires in the industry you are trying to enter. I can think of half a dozen industries or positions where that type of non-employment interests would put you at the head of the class.  But he's right. In some organizations it would be frowned upon.

VorFemme

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #94 on: January 09, 2014, 11:14:36 AM »
I did an online interview with someone once, and this guy was one of our top candidates for several slots.  I and the other two women doing the interview with me all thought that his application was stellar, his first, brief interview had been wonderful, and that he was what we were looking for. 

We met up in a chat room (this was before Skype, etc.) so we could all talk--or type, since it was online.  (The position was online, thus, interviewing online to see how he read.)

About five minutes into the interview, he interrupted what I was typing to blurt out that this was the first time he'd ever done an interview naked.

Yeah.  That ended *that* real quick.

Maybe he thought he was interviewing for a nudist resort and he was trying to (un)dress appropriately....

I was thinking of the old advice on public speaking (or interviews) - you were supposed to imagine the OTHER people undressed (or in underwear) so that you could relax.

He seems to have gotten it wrong....
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Margo

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #95 on: January 09, 2014, 11:21:28 AM »
Very True!

In my field (or at least, in my bit of it!) those sorts of things would be appropriate on the CV but they would be a brief paragraph at the end.

It would also, particularly for those who weren't coming form a similar job and who therefore might not have obvious experience in some areas to use the hobbies to show they did have relevant skills (e.g.  I organised a group of 6 people to canoe across the Gobi desert to raise money for orphaned tadpoles. Obtaining the appropriate visas and permits to visit the secret tadpole graveyard required me to use my skills as an organiser, as I needed to collate large amounts of information, ensure that all documents were completed in a timely manner and the correct order and that all necessary signatures were obtained. I believe that these skills will translate well to the document juggling requirement of the job)

jaxsue

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #96 on: January 09, 2014, 11:51:51 AM »
It's crazy that in this day and age people don't know how to interview properly. I thought that basic interview etiquette was common knowledge.
I was not taught interviewing skills until college. There were no professional development courses offered in high school. For people who don't go to college (or don't take that elective) who come from families where the parents might not remember interviewing or have never really done it successfully themselves, I am not surprised that many people don't know how it works.

I donít think itís necessary to go to college in order to learn/know how to dress and apply for and interview for a job.

My first interview was in high school when I signed up to be an office assistant in the principalís office.  It was not a paid job, and we werenít allowed to wear jeans back then, but I didnít need college courses to teach me how to dress, fill out a form, answer questions, and conduct myself.  Iím not bragging; the same applied to all the other students who did this type work.  I also applied, interviewed, and was hired for a job as a store cashier while I was in high school.

When my niece and nephews were in high school (2005 Ė 2011) virtually all of them (perhaps with help from parents) applied, interviewed and were hired for part-time paid jobs.  Two of them were in programs where they were instructed/coached on how to dress and apply/interview for jobs.

ITA with the bolded. I had my first job that required an interview at age 16. IME most high school kids had PT jobs. Back then, a resume was understandably thin, but knowing how to dress and how to speak in a more formal situation was pretty basic. It doesn't need to be "official" training; it can be information coming from adults such as parents, family friends, etc. Although I can see the value in providing this information in school.

magicdomino

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #97 on: January 09, 2014, 12:15:59 PM »
I remember this from the 80s.  Resumes has marital status, hobbies, and lots of other non-essential information.  I was told it was to make us look like an individual with an interesting life.   ::)

Did anyone else get the suggestion that you have your resume printed on something other than standard white paper?  I used a letterhead-quality cream, but can imagine there were whole rainbows of resumes out there.

Yvaine

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #98 on: January 09, 2014, 12:19:46 PM »
I remember this from the 80s.  Resumes has marital status, hobbies, and lots of other non-essential information.  I was told it was to make us look like an individual with an interesting life.   ::)

Did anyone else get the suggestion that you have your resume printed on something other than standard white paper?  I used a letterhead-quality cream, but can imagine there were whole rainbows of resumes out there.

Yup! Colored paper, etc., was recommended, and for a while there was an epidemic of people going overboard with scented paper and confetti falling out of the envelope when the employer opened it, and so on. And then poof, pretty much the whole concept is gone now because everything's online and the employer is just going to print it onto their own printer paper anyway! :)

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #99 on: January 09, 2014, 12:23:37 PM »
Did anyone else get the suggestion that you have your resume printed on something other than standard white paper?  I used a letterhead-quality cream, but can imagine there were whole rainbows of resumes out there.

We were given specific resume paper. Kind of weird yellowish/cream color, heavy stock but not quiet card stock. This is what your resume was printed on. Every time. BTW I was born in the 80s...so this was pretty recent (graduated high school '05). I never much got the point, I mean sure the paper looked nice, but the content was the same. I will say sometimes I find the bright white computer paper with the black ink and the bright office lighting to be a bit harsh on my eyes, so I miss the resume paper. I mean, it still exists I just don't use it.

The rainbow of colors though, reminds of Legally Blonde, when here resume was pink. And scented. Talk about making yourself stand out.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #100 on: January 09, 2014, 12:27:58 PM »
It doesn't need to be "official" training; it can be information coming from adults such as parents, family friends, etc. Although I can see the value in providing this information in school.

My mother used to drill me on interviewing. I had my first job at 14, and my boss commented to me, after I was hired and had to fill out my new hire paperwork, that he'd had no idea I was so young as I interviewed like I'd been doing for it years. I looked him square in the eye and point blank said "I have been".

She didn't teach me how to use eyeliner or walk in heels, but she made darn sure I was going to able to get and hold down a job.

jaxsue

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #101 on: January 10, 2014, 12:00:18 PM »
It doesn't need to be "official" training; it can be information coming from adults such as parents, family friends, etc. Although I can see the value in providing this information in school.

My mother used to drill me on interviewing. I had my first job at 14, and my boss commented to me, after I was hired and had to fill out my new hire paperwork, that he'd had no idea I was so young as I interviewed like I'd been doing for it years. I looked him square in the eye and point blank said "I have been".

She didn't teach me how to use eyeliner or walk in heels, but she made darn sure I was going to able to get and hold down a job.

Your mom did a great job! :-) When I got my first "real" job my boss mentioned how I came in dressed nicely for the interview, vs. other teenagers who came in dressed sloppily.

Twik

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #102 on: January 10, 2014, 02:33:32 PM »
I recall one story about a woman who put at the end of her resume she was a birdwatcher, and got the job because of it. The company owner was a twitcher, and she answered his phone. So, if it were an alert, say, that a Ross's Gull had been spotted on the waterfront, she would know to immediately interrupt any meeting he was in.
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PrettySticks

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #103 on: January 10, 2014, 03:17:46 PM »
My first job was working retail in high school - where I just filled out an application, no resume - and I also eventually worked summers as a counselor at a camp where I'd been a camper for many years, so I never actually applied for that; they just kind of hired me once I was old enough .  So this thread made me try to remember where I actually learned to write a resume.  I first needed one when I was in college and I was applying for internships and I believe I just opened up the Resume template in Word and filled it out.  That was fifteen years ago and I still edit the same resume to this day. :D

I've had various jobs in publicity and marketing for performing arts non-profits, so I do include a brief hobbies section at the bottom, because for my business that can be relevant.  For example, I'm into photography on a very amateur level, but knowing about it means I'm good at sorting, editing and archiving all the photos we get from performances and events.  This came up in an interview for my current job where I do that a lot, since it hadn't been a job task on any of my previous jobs.  And more generally, for publicity, the more interests you have, the more places it would occur to you to pitch.  But I certainly agree it's a matter of knowing your industry.

Flibbertigibbet

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Re: I guess you don't really want a job, do you?
« Reply #104 on: January 13, 2014, 07:37:24 AM »
Back in the dark ages when I was at school (circa 1994/5), we had a work experience week at the end of year ten (so age 14/15) where local employers would take pupils on for a week ( or maybe two - I forget) to do work experience with them. You had to apply for the placement, be interviewed for it, so you went through the whole gamut of 'getting a job' steps - including applying for more than one placement (you would get one of them - but not necessarily be offered them all). The employers then gave feedback on the application, the interview, and the whole of the placement. Valuable experience I think - even if a lot of it seemed to me to be common sense, perhaps it wasn't for others. Do schools not do this anymore? This is in the UK.