Author Topic: When people disipline your pets.  (Read 9189 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Shea

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4111
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #45 on: January 04, 2014, 08:38:24 PM »
I think it's bizzare.  I mean my cats listen to the people in this household because they know us.  I can't even imagine that they would listen to a strange person yelling at them. 

Really? I've never had a cat that listened to anybody. Especially anybody yelling.

Oh, I've been successful now and then in shooing them off from some place by clapping at them right next to them. But simple yelling? None of my cats have ever paid the slightest bit of attention. Oh, sometimes they might cringe a little bit, but it's *only* for show. It never stops them doing anything.

I've never met PastryGoddess's cat, but mine listens to me and BF. She's allowed anywhere but on the dining table and kitchen counters (and she knows it), but she'll sometimes hop up there anyway. All it takes is one of us telling her "No!" or "Off!" in slightly raised voices, and she jumps off. I know that's unusual for cats though :).


If a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, librarians are a global threat.

TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 31734
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #46 on: January 04, 2014, 08:58:53 PM »
I just had to scruff one of the cats and give her a gentle shake because not even the dreaded squirt bottle kept her from appointing herself guardian of the food and water dishes and preventing all of the other cats from eating or drinking. 

I needed to remind her that the biggest cat here is me and treating her like a Momma cat treats a kitten is one of the ways that our vet recommended dealing with that kind of behavior.  It appears to have worked, as she is now in my lap purring away and her whole attitude is "what food and water dishes are you talking about?"  :)

This reminds me--when it was the vet assistant who "disciplined" my cat, badly.

My last cat really reacted badly to being "scruffed"--I always said she had a bad case of you're NOT my mother's. She'd flat-out launch an attack at you if you tried that.

I took her to the vet, and she was snarling, etc. The vet thought he could hold her down, w/ a towel, etc., and was trying to figure out how to wrap her, or whatever. The vet assistant came in, got a disgusted "you people don't know what you're doing" look on her face, and advanced on my cat with her arm out.

I started to say, as fast as I could, "DON'T grab her by the scruff of..." I think I got as far as "grab," and she'd latched onto the scruff of my kitty's neck.

Seven-five gouge wounds later, the vet finally agreed with my very initial suggestion of sedating her.

So yeah, in my experience, what works with one cat may well backfire with another. That's another reason not to try to discipline someone's pet.

Maybe my cats have never really listened to me because I've always assumed they wouldn't, and therefore didn't end up finding anything that worked, because I didn't really try.

cass2591

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3370
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #47 on: January 04, 2014, 09:51:35 PM »
Years ago I screamed at a Chicago PO not to shoot my cat.

He was in my apartment asking me about a burglary in the building, which I knew nothing about, but my cat came from right behind him and jumped on something noisy that startled the cop. Before I could say anything he whirled around while instinctively putting his hand on his gun, but obviously didn't draw it. It was rather amusing, though probably more for me than him. the d

Other than that I figure the cat/dog won't be psychologically traumatized if someone else scolds it. Hurt it and we'll have issues, but that's never happened.
There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened. ~ Mark Twain

Adopting a pet won't change the world, but it will change the world for that pet.

ladyknight1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8337
  • Operating the logic hammer since 1987.
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #48 on: January 04, 2014, 09:57:54 PM »
Verbal warnings to me about my animal? No problem.
Shouting, when the animal is not in danger? Problem.
Touching one of my animals in a bad way? The person would be leaving and would not return.


MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3069
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #49 on: January 04, 2014, 11:11:28 PM »
Yes, they screamed at my cat.  It is possible that I considered it screaming because my house is normally quiet.  We all speak at a normal level.  It is also possible that I was sensitive to it with my neighbor because it had just happened a few days prior.

The people I am speaking of are "dog people".  I certainly don't scream, yell, or talk loudly at their dogs to stop barking or to stop jumping on me.  To them, their dogs are just greeting me.

wheeitsme

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4038
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #50 on: January 04, 2014, 11:24:43 PM »
I am a "dog person".  I would never scream/yell at an animal that wasn't endangering itself.  Not being a dog/cat/whatever person is not a good excuse.

In the situations you are describing, I would probably stare at the person for a second and then go over to my pet and give it some comfort touches and say (very clearly),  "It's okay sweetie, you are being a very good dog/cat/whatever".  And then go on like nothing happened.  If it happened again, then I would do the same thing but add "I would appreciate it if you didn't yell at my pet".

MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3069
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #51 on: January 04, 2014, 11:47:15 PM »
I am a "dog person".  I would never scream/yell at an animal that wasn't endangering itself.  Not being a dog/cat/whatever person is not a good excuse.

In the situations you are describing, I would probably stare at the person for a second and then go over to my pet and give it some comfort touches and say (very clearly),  "It's okay sweetie, you are being a very good dog/cat/whatever".  And then go on like nothing happened.  If it happened again, then I would do the same thing but add "I would appreciate it if you didn't yell at my pet".

I mentioned that they are "dog people" because it might be helpful to some people responding to my post.  None of these friends that I am referring to would ever consider a cat for their pet. 

wheeitsme

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4038
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #52 on: January 04, 2014, 11:55:28 PM »
I am a "dog person".  I would never scream/yell at an animal that wasn't endangering itself.  Not being a dog/cat/whatever person is not a good excuse.

In the situations you are describing, I would probably stare at the person for a second and then go over to my pet and give it some comfort touches and say (very clearly),  "It's okay sweetie, you are being a very good dog/cat/whatever".  And then go on like nothing happened.  If it happened again, then I would do the same thing but add "I would appreciate it if you didn't yell at my pet".

I mentioned that they are "dog people" because it might be helpful to some people responding to my post.  None of these friends that I am referring to would ever consider a cat for their pet.

Oh, I didn't take that badly, I just wanted to point out that "Dog people" isn't a good excuse.

MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3069
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #53 on: January 04, 2014, 11:58:14 PM »
I am a "dog person".  I would never scream/yell at an animal that wasn't endangering itself.  Not being a dog/cat/whatever person is not a good excuse.

In the situations you are describing, I would probably stare at the person for a second and then go over to my pet and give it some comfort touches and say (very clearly),  "It's okay sweetie, you are being a very good dog/cat/whatever".  And then go on like nothing happened.  If it happened again, then I would do the same thing but add "I would appreciate it if you didn't yell at my pet".

I mentioned that they are "dog people" because it might be helpful to some people responding to my post.  None of these friends that I am referring to would ever consider a cat for their pet.

Oh, I didn't take that badly, I just wanted to point out that "Dog people" isn't a good excuse.

Thank you.

Margo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1729
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #54 on: January 06, 2014, 05:09:31 AM »
Like Toots, I also equate this with correcting someone else's child.  Unless the pet and/or child are in danger, you stay out of it.

I wouldn't like someone correcting my dogs or my children.  Stay out of it or go home!

I agree with this, except in a situation where the pet or child is bothering the guest - e.g. if a dog is jumping up on a guest / child is hitting them with a toy / cat is trying to walk on them   and the owner doesn't step in to stop that or check that the guest is OK with it, then it is not unreasonable for the guest to take steps of their own. Of course yelling or hitting isn't appropriate, but if the guest is not familiar with the pet/child they may speak more forcefully than is necessary.

I don't currently have a cat, but when I did, I assumed that as his owner I was responsible for him, and that included checking whether guests were OK with him, and either letting them know how to respond if he came closer then they were comfortable with, or shutting him put of the room, as appropriate.

Arila

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 873
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #55 on: January 06, 2014, 11:53:55 AM »
Actually, you did exactly what I would have done -- you picked him up and took him to another/safe room. Strangers (And sometimes owners) shouting at (my) cats doesn't faze them at all, so I don't think he was harmed by the initial incident, and by removing him to a place where they are just as happy solves the issue for all involved.

A friend of mine has explained that the cat is not allowed on counters or tables, so I have participated in alerting/shooing the cat, so I guess I see the temptation for your guests.

Lady Godiva

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 112
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #56 on: January 06, 2014, 01:31:21 PM »
Not exactly a guest disciplining my cat, but maybe the guest was schooled by the cat?

A fellow once came to pick me up for a date and spent way too much berating me for having a cat (according to him, they're dirty, smelly, treacherous and dangerous.) He told me I'd have to get rid of my cat if I wanted to spend time with His Wonderfulness. He'd dropped his jacket on the couch, and Scarlett O'Hara, my calico Maine Coon cat, deliberately walked over and scratched over the jacket as if covering something in the litterbox. He had no idea how clearly and completely he'd been insulted in Feline. Scarlett was absolutely right about him, and that was our first and last date!

wolfie

  • I don't know what this is so I am putting random words here
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7360
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #57 on: January 06, 2014, 01:48:24 PM »
We have a cat, a very curious cat.  He is a rescue and we love him.  We adopted him a year ago this month and he was estimated to be about 4 weeks old.  He now is a large cat, about 10lbs.

My 17 pounders disagree and say your cat is normal size! :-)

I have never had my cats be yelled at by anyone but me. And that is when a fight breaks out. They are pretty good at knowing what they are allowed to do and what I will tolerate and sticking to it. I wouldn't like it if someone else yelled at them - besides that fact that it would make no difference. I remember berating Loki for doing something and having her turn around and look behind her. It was so obvious she was trying to say "what other Loki? Cause it couldn't have been me"

MindsEye

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1165
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #58 on: January 06, 2014, 02:15:06 PM »
Like Toots, I also equate this with correcting someone else's child.  Unless the pet and/or child are in danger, you stay out of it.

I wouldn't like someone correcting my dogs or my children.  Stay out of it or go home!

I agree with this, except in a situation where the pet or child is bothering the guest - e.g. if a dog is jumping up on a guest / child is hitting them with a toy / cat is trying to walk on them   and the owner doesn't step in to stop that or check that the guest is OK with it, then it is not unreasonable for the guest to take steps of their own. Of course yelling or hitting isn't appropriate, but if the guest is not familiar with the pet/child they may speak more forcefully than is necessary.

I think this is still unreasonable.

See, I am having trouble wrapping my head around a situation where a hypothetical guest is being made uncomfortable by a cat climbing on the couch next to them (and possibly wanting to play or curl up in their lap) and that guest doesn't just get up and walk away.

Standing your ground and forcing a confrontation is a better option then removing yourself from the situation?   ???

I don't get it. 

esposita

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 559
  • If you have the power to make someone happy, do it
Re: When people disipline your pets.
« Reply #59 on: January 06, 2014, 02:22:06 PM »
Like Toots, I also equate this with correcting someone else's child.  Unless the pet and/or child are in danger, you stay out of it.

I wouldn't like someone correcting my dogs or my children.  Stay out of it or go home!

I agree with this, except in a situation where the pet or child is bothering the guest - e.g. if a dog is jumping up on a guest / child is hitting them with a toy / cat is trying to walk on them   and the owner doesn't step in to stop that or check that the guest is OK with it, then it is not unreasonable for the guest to take steps of their own. Of course yelling or hitting isn't appropriate, but if the guest is not familiar with the pet/child they may speak more forcefully than is necessary.

I think this is still unreasonable.

See, I am having trouble wrapping my head around a situation where a hypothetical guest is being made uncomfortable by a cat climbing on the couch next to them (and possibly wanting to play or curl up in their lap) and that guest doesn't just get up and walk away.

Standing your ground and forcing a confrontation is a better option then removing yourself from the situation?   ???

I don't get it.

My experience is limited, but I have never met a cat that wanted to play or cuddle who wouldn't also continue to follow me if I got up. In fact they usually escalate it by reaching for me with a paw which ends up freaking me out a bit more, because claws.
I probably wouldn't even try to physically bop the cat or remove it from myself, I'd just keep still and call my host to help.