Author Topic: Moving sick child rude?  (Read 6785 times)

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Mental Magpie

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2014, 11:16:41 AM »
Thanks for the congratulations!



We didn't have any popcorn as we had eaten dinner before going to the movies (and that's what came back up), but had we, I wish I would have thought quick enough to use that as I sprinted for the bathroom.
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Firecat

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2014, 11:17:58 AM »
Congratulations on your engagement!


I think you did absolutely the right thing getting her out of the theater, for the sake of the other moviegoers (and poor little one, it's miserable to be that sick, especially in public!). I'm one of those who really hates throwing up, and being around anyone else who is - the sounds and the smell just get to me, even though I'm normally not squeamish. So I'd have appreciated the quick exit on your part.

Thipu1

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2014, 11:30:43 AM »
Add me to the list of those offering congratulations on your engagement. 

You did exactly the right thing.  A sick child needs to be taken to a place where she can have a little privacy.  Having her stay in the theater would only add to her misery not to mention the discomfort of other patrons. 


oopsie

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2014, 11:32:09 AM »
This is one those impossible to get right situations.  You feel bad regardless of what you do.  :(  I hope she feels better soon.

POD.

Something similar happened to me once. I was at the movies with my kids, MIL and three of my kids' cousins who were staying with MIL that weekend. One of the cousins (he was about 9 years old at the time) suddenly and unexpectedly threw up. In that case, we just stayed put since the movie was almost over, the theatre was dark and we didn't want to try to take him out and have him accidentally throw up on or near another moviegoer on the way.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2014, 11:40:18 AM »
First! Congrats!

Second:  You did the right thing. Yes, it spread out the mess but I'm with the others that it was still right to move her.  I've been there, sorta.  In my case the child was just 2 and it only got on me but I exited as quickly as I could with his 4 year old brother behind me.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Mikayla

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2014, 11:41:02 AM »
Congrats! 

I agree with everyone else.  Also, if your FMIL isn't getting it, ask her to picture herself in a movie theater and the kid a few seats down is doing this.  Would she prefer the child be removed, or that the child stays put until she's thoroughly emptied the contents of her tummy?

I have trouble picturing someone picking Door #2.

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2014, 12:00:50 PM »
There are some situations, and I think this is one, where the answer is 'make a decision, ANY decision, and then go with it and DON'T CHANGE YOUR MIND!' I would have done what you did (but then, I know that both the Chicks, once they start to boak, will keep going until the tank's empty) but I suppose I can see that there might be an argument the other way. If your instinct is to grab and run, then grab and run without second guessing yourself. Don't stop to ask 'are you going to be sick again?' because the answer 'no' is probably more hopeful than accurate.

Oh, and if you were worrying about what the people around you might have been thinking, don't. The ones who have had children were either thinking 'oh, poor girl' (meaning either you or the child) or possibly 'there but for the grace of Deity go I' with a side order of 'remember when Joshua did that in church? Yes, I do, thanks, and I wish I didn't'. The ones without children were probably thinking much the same, adapted to 'your friend Susie's Joshua'.

I wouldn't worry too much about what FMIL thinks; I would be more worried about what your stepdaughter thinks - 6 is old enough to be absolutely mortified at that having happened in public. But I'm sure you have that in hand!

lowspark

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2014, 12:08:10 PM »
There's absolutely no way I'd stay sitting in a movie theatre with my child who just threw up. I'd get her out of there asap just like you did. Who knows how many times she'll throw up. The goal is to get her to the restroom asap and hope she can hold out long enough before having to puke again. You didn't make it, well, that happens. But certainly it would have been worse for her to throw up repeatedly in the theatre.

If I were a fellow audience member and you didn't move quickly to remove her, I'd be thinking, Hey! Get your sick child out of here!

You played it perfectly correctly.

And yes, Congratulations!!!

Firecat

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2014, 12:19:56 PM »
There are some situations, and I think this is one, where the answer is 'make a decision, ANY decision, and then go with it and DON'T CHANGE YOUR MIND!' I would have done what you did (but then, I know that both the Chicks, once they start to boak, will keep going until the tank's empty) but I suppose I can see that there might be an argument the other way. If your instinct is to grab and run, then grab and run without second guessing yourself. Don't stop to ask 'are you going to be sick again?' because the answer 'no' is probably more hopeful than accurate.

Oh, and if you were worrying about what the people around you might have been thinking, don't. The ones who have had children were either thinking 'oh, poor girl' (meaning either you or the child) or possibly 'there but for the grace of Deity go I' with a side order of 'remember when Joshua did that in church? Yes, I do, thanks, and I wish I didn't'. The ones without children were probably thinking much the same, adapted to 'your friend Susie's Joshua'.

I wouldn't worry too much about what FMIL thinks; I would be more worried about what your stepdaughter thinks - 6 is old enough to be absolutely mortified at that having happened in public. But I'm sure you have that in hand!

I'd probably have been thinking something like: "That? Right there? Big reason why I don't have kids...poor kid...and poor mom!"

And I also agree with those pointing out that the girl might have suddenly developed a need to expel from the - er - other end, too, so it was really a good thing to get her to a bathroom as quickly as possible, for all of those reasons. I still vividly remember the last time I had food poisoning, and it's utterly miserable. Luckily, I was home when it hit, but it's been two years, and I still haven't eaten at that restaurant again, nor do I have any plans to in the future!

Take2

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2014, 12:21:07 PM »
If my 6yo threw up in a theater, I would run to the bathroom with the child.

1. The SOUND of throwing up is unpleasant, too. Other people in the theater shouldn't have to deal with that repeatedly.
2. I would feel horrible that the theater now has a smell and mess for others to have to experience, but I always find that people are more understanding when the adults take immediate action of some sort, which acknowledges that the situation is their problem to try to solve.
3. Dark theater is not a good place to see what the child's other symptoms are
4. I need to ask the child questions about symptoms to figure out next steps, that conversation shouldn't happen in a theater.
5. I need to get the child a wet paper towel and possibly a sip of water, none of the resources I need are in a dark theater.

And really, even in my own home, if a child is throwing up we head to the bathroom. The mess MAY be in more places, or we may make it to the toilet for the next round. Either way, we reinforce the message that throwing up in a toilet is the best option so the kid eventually heads toward a toilet without adults suggesting it when sick. Over time, we have mitigated future messes this way!

Drunken Housewife

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2014, 01:05:44 PM »
I think you did exactly the right thing.  No one wants to be around someone who is vomiting, and your little girl needed to be taken out of that movie theatre STAT.  The other people paid to watch a movie, not listen to vomiting and crying (poor little girl).  You got her into a place where it was better for her, where she could cry without being hushed and where you could clean her up and where it was better to continue vomiting.

What an awkward moment.  I think you did the best thing possible.  If you'd kept her in the theatre, there was even a chance that her vomiting would have triggered someone else to vomit. 
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CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2014, 01:13:22 PM »
Your instinctual reaction was right on.  There was no way to predict what was going to happen next, and the chances of no further mess were zero.

In retrospect, the second best option would've been to leave the child in Grandma's lap  >:D.  Also, there wasn't any mention in your post that Grandma helped with the cleanup.  I hope that she did.  Otherwise . . .  >:( .
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2014, 01:32:18 PM »
Your instinctual reaction was right on.  There was no way to predict what was going to happen next, and the chances of no further mess were zero.

In retrospect, the second best option would've been to leave the child in Grandma's lap  >:D.  Also, there wasn't any mention in your post that Grandma helped with the cleanup.  I hope that she did.  Otherwise . . .  >:( .

She did.  FMIL moves a little bit slower so by the time she got to the bathroom, Bug had emptied herself (for then, as we would later find out).  FMIL cleaned up the mess near the entrance while I cleaned up Bug, me, and the toilet.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Kaymar

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2014, 01:50:01 PM »
Think you did the right thing here, but I'm so confused - thought you were already engaged?  With sporting tickets?  I remember because I thought it was a cool way to propose!  In any case, good luck :)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Moving sick child rude?
« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2014, 02:00:14 PM »
Think you did the right thing here, but I'm so confused - thought you were already engaged?  With sporting tickets?  I remember because I thought it was a cool way to propose!  In any case, good luck :)

That went belly up awhile back...long story shorter (and I will fully admit I was stupid), the Eagle wanted to "separate", see other people.  I think he thought it would make me happier and I would see what I was missing out on.  I took him up on it and wound up meeting my current fiance, who knew the situation from the beginning.  He was quite content just having fun and said he understood if I went back to the Eagle.  I fell in love and so did he.  I officially broke it off with the Eagle in September.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.