Author Topic: Some like it hot  (Read 1495 times)

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Josiepug

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #30 on: September 19, 2014, 12:46:56 PM »
Most architecture in Chicago is not designed for passively shedding heat; the major goal would be maintaining warmth and not being overloaded with snow in the winter. So, enclosed buildings exposed to baking sun without ventilation can reach dangerous temperatures quite quickly (similar to cars in the sun becoming dangerous to children and pets).

Yeah, I don't live in Chicago, but I've compared my current home to a brick oven. It conserves heat reaaaaalllllly well. This is great in the winter! But in summer, it'll heat up to the outside temperature and then stay there even through the night when the actual outdoors has cooled off. Like, 95 degrees F at midnight, when the outside has gone down to 80. And the windows are not arranged well to conduct air through the house, due to some interior walls that aren't original to the house. The AC is old and sputtery, and I'm surprised it got through the summer. It's a beautiful old building, but I might have chosen a different apartment if I'd toured the place in July, rather than in January as I actually did.

And I live along the Gulf Coast in a house that was built for the weather. My house will stay 10 degrees below outside temps all summer. But it will also do that in winter. So if its 30F outside it's 20-25F in my house without a heater. I love my little house during the summer but winters are miserable.

Thipu1

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #31 on: September 20, 2014, 12:32:14 PM »
The problem in NYC is that the city is surrounded by water.  That means that the humidity can be awful.

  Summer here has been likened to a large cat sitting on your face.  The sort of winter weather we get is often referred to by the African-American term 'Hawk'.  Yes, when it's cold, windy and humid you can feel the talons digging in. 

Cyradis

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #32 on: September 20, 2014, 01:48:03 PM »
Most architecture in Chicago is not designed for passively shedding heat; the major goal would be maintaining warmth and not being overloaded with snow in the winter. So, enclosed buildings exposed to baking sun without ventilation can reach dangerous temperatures quite quickly (similar to cars in the sun becoming dangerous to children and pets).

Yeah, I don't live in Chicago, but I've compared my current home to a brick oven. It conserves heat reaaaaalllllly well. This is great in the winter! But in summer, it'll heat up to the outside temperature and then stay there even through the night when the actual outdoors has cooled off. Like, 95 degrees F at midnight, when the outside has gone down to 80. And the windows are not arranged well to conduct air through the house, due to some interior walls that aren't original to the house. The AC is old and sputtery, and I'm surprised it got through the summer. It's a beautiful old building, but I might have chosen a different apartment if I'd toured the place in July, rather than in January as I actually did.

And I live along the Gulf Coast in a house that was built for the weather. My house will stay 10 degrees below outside temps all summer. But it will also do that in winter. So if its 30F outside it's 20-25F in my house without a heater. I love my little house during the summer but winters are miserable.

Our homes are built like that as well to take advantage of the sea breezes. We don't have winter, luckily. When I went to college it was shocking how hot Illinois could get. And the temperature in summer didn't go down when the sun did. :(

ladyknight1

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #33 on: September 20, 2014, 04:55:45 PM »
From Texas, have lived in Florida for 23 years and I know that the way heat and humidity interact plus what you are accustomed to are the factors. In some areas, where the residents don't have air conditioning, there are senior activity centers for them, but transportation plays an important part as well.

My area has an organization called Seniors First that delivers meals daily to seniors at risk (no family close by and live alone or with another senior) and the home conditions are checked on a regular basis and social services gets involved if the air conditioning breaks. It's simply too hot in the summer to live here with no air conditioning. With humidity, we average 108F in the summer on the hotter days and the hottest this year was 115F.

sparksals

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #34 on: September 20, 2014, 05:34:33 PM »
Look at it from the other side of the coin.  Those of us in cold climates don't understand how people die in cold snaps.  I'm sure you would find it difficult to adjust to 50 below zero when you are not prepared for it.


Many people live in poor areas and don't have air conditioning.  The temp in Chicago fluctuates from -40 to over 100 degrees.  That requires an AC and Furnace.  Heating and AC costs are expensive and sometimes people can't afford them or they have htem but can't afford the bill, so they don't use them.


Where you live, you are accustomed to that temp.  I imagine you have AC. What temp would you find Brrrr Cold?


ladyknight1

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #35 on: September 20, 2014, 05:39:25 PM »
Because I used to live in a pretty cold winter climate, I don't turn on the heater until it is below 50 degrees farenheit outside. My son is usually freezing at that point. We have community issues with people keeping warm when it dips below 50 F here. There are blanket drives every year.

AnnaJ

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #36 on: September 20, 2014, 05:47:43 PM »
I remember a summer or two ago there were people dying in Paris when it hit about 100F, so I think that the combination of city with lots of concrete + not a lot of air conditioners can be lethal, especially to older people.

I live in the desert and every year we have one to three weeks of 110F+ temps and people rarely die, mostly because air conditioning is everywhere.

rose red

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2014, 08:50:28 PM »
The sun makes a difference too. In Chicago, 80F on an overcast day feel so much cooler than 80F on a bright sunny humid day. Sadly, the sun is usually blazing bright in the Summer. Heat rises and with the sun also baring down and heat getting trapped in a house making it hotter than outside, tragedy can and will happen.

kareng57

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2014, 11:12:25 PM »
Just remembered this, too. Back in 1996, we went to the World's Fair in Vancouver. It was July and the temps reached around 81 degrees, Coming from Houston where normal summer temps hover in the mid to high 90s, we were thrilled with how cool it was! Some locals we were chatting with while standing in line for exhibits were complaining (and apologizing to us!) about how hot it was. It's all relative.  :D

I think you mean 1986. :)

kareng57

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #39 on: September 20, 2014, 11:23:45 PM »
Humans seem to adjust really well to their local climate. Friends in US, Canada and Sweden have a bit of a giggle when I complain about winters where I live. But an 8 degree celcius maximum day does feel bitterly cold here, especially when the wind whips past the snow. That's not cold to them. When I visit family on the coast during winter, I tease them a bit about it being so tropical. I'm wearing short sleeves while they think it's freezing. I used to cope just find with hot humid weather (grew up in the tropics) but I think I'd keel over and die if I had to live there now. I've become used to a much drier climate.

Where I live, we have fairly warm summers. January is the hottest month, with an average daily max of 27.7 C, an average of 10 days of 30 C or more, with 2 days of 35C or more (quoting from government stats). I only have a portable aircon in my bedroom so I really feel it when the temp climbs - time to go hang out at the shops, library or cinema where it's airconditioned. It was much worse when bushfires went through some years back. In the aftermath, power was cut to many areas for days so no way to cool our home, and the heat and smell of smoke made opening the windows problematic (we were just so grateful we still had a home). It felt so hot I could barely think.

I've noticed it's become more difficult for my mum to cope with summer temps as she has aged (in her 70s now). Even with our warm climate, we still get warnings when there is a heatwave for extra care to be taken with vulnerable populations (like the elderly and infants).


Canada is a pretty large country, and the southern West Coast generally has a quite mild climate.  And what that can mean is pretty minimal snow-removal equipment.  A sudden snowstorm can grind a West Coast city pretty much to a halt, while it would be quite routine in other areas of the country.

And some more northern cities such as Edmonton get a lot hotter in summer, even though they get  much colder in winter than the West Coast.  So, it's hard to generalise re particular countries.

Psychopoesie

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #40 on: September 21, 2014, 08:22:33 AM »
Humans seem to adjust really well to their local climate. Friends in US, Canada and Sweden have a bit of a giggle when I complain about winters where I live. But an 8 degree celcius maximum day does feel bitterly cold here, especially when the wind whips past the snow. That's not cold to them. When I visit family on the coast during winter, I tease them a bit about it being so tropical. I'm wearing short sleeves while they think it's freezing. I used to cope just find with hot humid weather (grew up in the tropics) but I think I'd keel over and die if I had to live there now. I've become used to a much drier climate.

Where I live, we have fairly warm summers. January is the hottest month, with an average daily max of 27.7 C, an average of 10 days of 30 C or more, with 2 days of 35C or more (quoting from government stats). I only have a portable aircon in my bedroom so I really feel it when the temp climbs - time to go hang out at the shops, library or cinema where it's airconditioned. It was much worse when bushfires went through some years back. In the aftermath, power was cut to many areas for days so no way to cool our home, and the heat and smell of smoke made opening the windows problematic (we were just so grateful we still had a home). It felt so hot I could barely think.

I've noticed it's become more difficult for my mum to cope with summer temps as she has aged (in her 70s now). Even with our warm climate, we still get warnings when there is a heatwave for extra care to be taken with vulnerable populations (like the elderly and infants).


Canada is a pretty large country, and the southern West Coast generally has a quite mild climate.  And what that can mean is pretty minimal snow-removal equipment.  A sudden snowstorm can grind a West Coast city pretty much to a halt, while it would be quite routine in other areas of the country.

And some more northern cities such as Edmonton get a lot hotter in summer, even though they get  much colder in winter than the West Coast.  So, it's hard to generalise re particular countries.

Confused! Was quoting of my post intended to suggest that I was generalising in this way? Was trying very hard not to do that. It's why I referenced friends who live in Canada, Sweden and US, rather than the countries as a whole. They're the ones doing the giggling about my winter wimpishness.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #41 on: September 21, 2014, 11:38:58 AM »
I took a fair amount of business trips to the California town of El Centro, which is in the desert, near the Mexican border. Average high temperatures in summer are 105/40 or more. It doesn't cool down all that much at night.

The town was settled in the early 20th Century, after the Colorado River was tapped for irrigation. Old timers told me that if you had any money, you sent the women & children to San Diego for the summer.  High temperatures in San Diego in summer are about the same as low temperatures in El Centro.

Where I live, it does frequently get over 100/38 in summer, but there are usually cool, evening breezes from the southwest. The average low temp at night is about 60/15. Many older homes were build with porches or even large verandas facing south or west, so people could sit outside in the evening & enjoy the breeze. These also have large windows that can be opened at night to cool the house off.

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lowspark

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Re: Some like it hot
« Reply #42 on: September 22, 2014, 10:05:31 AM »
Just remembered this, too. Back in 1996, we went to the World's Fair in Vancouver. It was July and the temps reached around 81 degrees, Coming from Houston where normal summer temps hover in the mid to high 90s, we were thrilled with how cool it was! Some locals we were chatting with while standing in line for exhibits were complaining (and apologizing to us!) about how hot it was. It's all relative.  :D

I think you mean 1986. :)

Yipes!! Right you are. My how time flies. Expo'86. It was a really good World's Fair!