Author Topic: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?  (Read 7162 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10286
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #75 on: September 13, 2014, 10:50:17 AM »
IMO, the level of celebration is based on individual taste. I love holidays and I made them big for my kids. My X-DH, OTOH, was meh on any holiday. If I could afford it, I'd throw big parties several times a year, especially for Halloween.

sparksals

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 17385
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #76 on: September 13, 2014, 02:01:47 PM »
Believe it or not, Canada has more holidays than the US. 

jaxsue

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10286
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #77 on: September 13, 2014, 02:11:05 PM »
Believe it or not, Canada has more holidays than the US.

My parents celebrated Boxing Day. As a kid, I thought it was when you fought in a ring!  :)

NFPwife

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 295
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #78 on: September 13, 2014, 02:24:13 PM »
Forget celebrations.  I want to have all the holidays off and vacation time my European coworkers did when I was stationed overseas.  We do not get enough time off work.  Deity forbid you take more than one of your vacation weeks at a time.  Well, we say "week", but it's really only five days, isn't it?  Most of us have ten vacation days a year, not really "two weeks".

I hear you! I had some international customers and it seemed like every time I turned around they had a "bank holiday" and they were taking 3 and 4 weeks of vacation at once. In fact, I think the union contract required that X number of vacation weeks be taken consecutively. Don't even get me started on maternity leave! An international colleague commented that she was having a hard time getting back in the swing after a one year mat leave and was seeking some ideas/ tips. Every American woman in the room so distracted by the mat leave, that the conversation completely derailed.

kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10466
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #79 on: September 13, 2014, 03:13:16 PM »
Forget celebrations.  I want to have all the holidays off and vacation time my European coworkers did when I was stationed overseas.  We do not get enough time off work.  Deity forbid you take more than one of your vacation weeks at a time.  Well, we say "week", but it's really only five days, isn't it?  Most of us have ten vacation days a year, not really "two weeks".

I hear you! I had some international customers and it seemed like every time I turned around they had a "bank holiday" and they were taking 3 and 4 weeks of vacation at once. In fact, I think the union contract required that X number of vacation weeks be taken consecutively. Don't even get me started on maternity leave! An international colleague commented that she was having a hard time getting back in the swing after a one year mat leave and was seeking some ideas/ tips. Every American woman in the room so distracted by the mat leave, that the conversation completely derailed.
My sister was expecting when our Mom died. I thought my Aunts and Uncles were going to storm her work. They were outraged at the limited time sis had off and that she was losing maternity leave time, because of taking off to deal with our Mother's death. (She had been hording PTO to add to the limited Maternity Leave.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21602
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #80 on: September 13, 2014, 03:16:43 PM »
As a teacher I have not had bereavement days. I have only had sick days I was allowed to use for funerals and other bereavement related issues.

nolechica

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6250
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #81 on: October 25, 2014, 06:48:52 PM »
Oh, and we all celebrate the Feast of St. Markdown's.  ;) i.e. discounted candy the day after pretty much any major holiday.

The next one is next week. ;)

nolechica

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6250
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #82 on: October 25, 2014, 06:52:27 PM »
I don't get sick of celebrating, but I'm still grumpy that my bday isn't one of the big parade and bbq holidays. It's a you must work for the state, feds, or the bank/post office to benefit holiday. Many holidays are magnified by kids, which I don't have or work with.

Mopsy428

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1819
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #83 on: October 25, 2014, 10:49:33 PM »
Some of these "celebrating" days are just another day off from work for me--if I'm lucky. My big holidays (meaning parties, Church, etc., etc.) are 7/4, Easter (I'm Catholic), Christmas and Thanksgiving. I never get sick of holidays because 1) I get a break from work, and 2) I get to be with my family. (The period between Presidents' Day (February) and Memorial Day feels so long because we don't get time off from work unless we request it.)

When I lived in Canada, we would get a lot more time off for some of the holidays than we would in the US.

BigBadBetty

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 304
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #84 on: October 26, 2014, 11:37:34 AM »
I don't get sick of celebrating, but I'm still grumpy that my bday isn't one of the big parade and bbq holidays. It's a you must work for the state, feds, or the bank/post office to benefit holiday. Many holidays are magnified by kids, which I don't have or work with.

In my state, state workers do not get off federal holidays like Veteran's Day, President's Day, Columbus Day, etc. They don't even get off the day after Thanksgiving. When I worked at a bank 20 years ago, we didn't get those days either. Plus we were open Saturdays. At least we weren't open on Sundays like some other banks in my area.

kglory

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 939
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #85 on: November 05, 2014, 04:07:10 PM »
I love it!  I actually think it makes the end of the year really festive and magical.

Add in the fact that the vast majority of my family's birthdays are somewhere from September through December, and that we celebrate both Hanukkah and Christmas, and yeah, you have a few months chock full of holidays.  But I think that makes it really fun!

Bottlecaps

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 237
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #86 on: November 05, 2014, 08:10:52 PM »
I don't mind it. I work pretty much every holiday except for Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas, so those are the biggies for us, although we celebrate some of the smaller holidays too in our own ways.

Valentine's Day - If I manage to get that evening off, Mr. Bottlecaps and I will go out to eat and spend time together. (I'm hoping to get that day off this year, as it will be our first Valentine's Day as a married couple, but if I can't, we can always celebrate it later in the week when I do get an evening off.)
St. Patrick's Day - We go to the local bar, put Flogging Molly on the jukebox, and drink, lol.
Easter - We celebrate it in a secular way. We have dinner at my sister's house most of the time, hang out with the family, then come home and enjoy the day off.
Halloween - We dress up and go to the local bar. They usually have karaoke for Halloween and a pretty good crowd going on. We'll usually have a party at Mr. Bottlecaps' best friend's house sometime around Halloween too.
Veteran's Day - We don't really celebrate it, but I always make it a point to wish Mr. Bottlecaps a happy one, since he is a vet.
Thanksgiving - Dinner at my sister's again. Basically the same as Easter, lol.
Christmas - I LOVE Christmas. I love to decorate, I love buying gifts for people, I love hearing/singing Christmas carols, the whole nine yards! We exchange gifts at my sister's house among the whole family on Christmas Eve, and have dinner there the next day (see a pattern here? LOL). Mr. Bottlecaps, my uncle who lives with us, and I exchange gifts on Christmas morning with each other here at our apartment. We also have a Christmas party at aforementioned friend's house.
New Year's Eve - We usually do a party at aforementioned friend's house for this one too. We all just chill out, maybe play some beer pong or something, drink beers, and watch the ball in NYC drop on TV. :)

Hmmmm - maybe we celebrate more holidays in my household than I originally thought! LOL!
"Some of the most wonderful people are the ones who don't fit into boxes." -Tori Amos


Girlie

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 527
Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #87 on: November 06, 2014, 11:13:50 AM »
There are many holidays that are merely "marked" in my group, unless someone chooses to do more.
 
My husband and I have no kids, so for Halloween, we bought candy for trick-or-treaters and bought some relatively inexpensive decorations and called it a day. We didn't go over the top.
For Thanksgiving, there's a nice dinner with our family (small, really - four or five adults, no little ones) with the traditional things, and a few decorations, but nothing hugely elaborate except for the turkey,
Christmas is a big deal, with full-blown decor and gifts and a special meal. If we ever have kids, I don't expect too much change other than lots more children's stuff and an earlier bedtime. It's very family-friendly, because we still celebrate with our parents.
Easter Sunday is our usual church service (no different than every other Sunday), and maybe a nice meal for lunch.
For the Fourth of July, we usually go watch the fireworks.

Everything else is marked. Sure, you might go to dinner for Valentine's Day, or you might make a corned beef brisket for St. Patrick's Day. You can have a cook-out on Labor Day or stay up late on New Year's Eve. If we don't do those things, though, it's mostly forgotten by the start of the next week, and we're on to much more important things.

Americans pick and choose their holiday celebrations. Some people do seem to have nonstop celebrations from October through February, but I would venture to say that most of us don't.