Author Topic: Do you line dry your laundry?  (Read 11145 times)

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Teenyweeny

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #150 on: March 19, 2014, 11:45:17 AM »
Quote
I also forgot that pulaver is probably an unknown term in the US-I don't think you'd find it offensive if you knew the context in which it's used in the UK. It's somewhere between 'daftness' and 'rigmarole'. And you only say something's daft if you're being friendly.



Don't you mean 'palaver'?

(Ducks)

I actually wondered about how to spell it, I don't think I've written it down before. I just went with the closest phonetic (in my accent) spelling.



Teenyweeny

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #151 on: March 19, 2014, 11:47:41 AM »
I don't get it either. Bung it all in the washing machine, separate lights from darks, wash everything at 30 or 40, job done. Our washing machines are different though. I hear those top loaders with the giant agitators in them can tear clothes up. We don't have those in our machines, it's just a drum.

They also take up a lot more room, hence the need for a laundry room, I guess?

And all this bleaching stuff - why is that necessary? Does washing powder not get the clothes clean? Perhaps our detergent is different too. You can buy stuff like Vanish, which you can bung in with the powder to get stains out if something's dried in or whatever, but that's all I've ever done. I've never had to bleach anything in my life.

My tumble drier is in the bedroom, covered by a throw; it makes a rather handy TV stand, actually :)

Yeah, I miiiiiiiiiiight use vanish if there's a persistent stain. I've never bleached clothes in my life either. Washing powder does the job fine, even for 99% of stains. Maybe UK washing powder is different?



Harriet Jones

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #152 on: March 19, 2014, 11:54:24 AM »
I don't get it either. Bung it all in the washing machine, separate lights from darks, wash everything at 30 or 40, job done. Our washing machines are different though. I hear those top loaders with the giant agitators in them can tear clothes up. We don't have those in our machines, it's just a drum.

They also take up a lot more room, hence the need for a laundry room, I guess?

And all this bleaching stuff - why is that necessary? Does washing powder not get the clothes clean? Perhaps our detergent is different too. You can buy stuff like Vanish, which you can bung in with the powder to get stains out if something's dried in or whatever, but that's all I've ever done. I've never had to bleach anything in my life.

My tumble drier is in the bedroom, covered by a throw; it makes a rather handy TV stand, actually :)

I'd say that's how most laundry's probably done in the US.  If you're going by what you might see on the internet or on TV, that's not representative of the entire US.

Personally, I don't use bleach on much of anything.  There are non-chlorine bleach alternatives that usually work pretty well.  However, my MIL bleaches everything and washes it all on hot, which is probably a holdover from when washing machines weren't all that great many decades ago.

I have a front loader that gets stuff pretty clean with only a few tablespoons of laundry detergent.  The top loader I used to have needed a lot more.

ladiedeathe

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #153 on: March 19, 2014, 11:59:57 AM »
Teenyweeny- my husband is British and we have a home in the UK also. I'm pretty familiar with the language.
"Here to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Have chalice, will travel."

ladyknight1

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #154 on: March 19, 2014, 12:00:00 PM »
I never use bleach or wash on hot. I use a front loader, much more efficient than the older top loaders and uses much less detergent. I only use liquid detergent in it.

I do one or two loads a week, in the evening. I hate using up a weekend day for chores.

Yvaine

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #155 on: March 19, 2014, 12:00:54 PM »
I'm in the US and I use bleach about once a year, usually to brighten up some dingy socks or towels. I mostly hate it because I never fail to accidentally spill some on my other laundry or on whatever I'm wearing at that moment, thus ruining it. If I went through a ton of smelly white athletic socks, I might use it more often, but I have way more darks than anything else so it's mostly pointless for me. Even my comfy socks are black.

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.

Sophia

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #156 on: March 19, 2014, 12:05:16 PM »
I am a forgetful person, so even when I was a poor college student I lived in apartments that had a washer/dryer because otherwise I would forget my laundry and I'd end up with no clothes. 
The washer/dryer was always in its own room which was sometimes just a closet off the kitchen.  But it was still called a laundry room, even though a person couldn't enter.   I think the idea is to suppress the noise, and to be able to close the door to make the rest of the house look neater.  Whenever I have seen the washer and dryer not behind a closed door, it is in the kitchen and then there is an obsession with making it match the kitchen appliances. 
What I don't understand on the topic is the idea that the washer and dryer have to be a matched set.  So, when the washer dies, people buy a washer AND a dryer. 

Teenyweeny

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #157 on: March 19, 2014, 12:08:01 PM »

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.

And that is a very good point. I also partially base my views on things I've read online, but I suspect there's a selection effect there because 99% of people who bother to describe their laundry habits online are probably wayyyy more invested in the whole process than I am.  ;D



Yvaine

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #158 on: March 19, 2014, 12:08:52 PM »

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.

And that is a very good point. I also partially base my views on things I've read online, but I suspect there's a selection effect there because 99% of people who bother to describe their laundry habits online are probably wayyyy more invested in the whole process than I am.  ;D

That's also true. I think this may be the first time I ever described my laundry process online. ;) Because it's BOORRRRRING.

Teenyweeny

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #159 on: March 19, 2014, 12:10:12 PM »
Teenyweeny- my husband is British and we have a home in the UK also. I'm pretty familiar with the language.

Maybe you know more serious people than I do, then.  ;) I've never heard anybody call anything a pulaver/palaver and mean anything serious by it.



perpetua

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #160 on: March 19, 2014, 12:14:02 PM »

I agree that TV seems to affect people's perception of the US to a huge degree. Commercials will show people (almost always women, of course  ::) ) doing laundry in a palatial laundry room and using about ten different products, because the commercial is trying to sell the products. They want you to think you need all those things, and they want you to see them in an inviting setting too. Most people's laundry facilities are not bigger than the Taj Mahal and most people, I think, don't use a whole array of potions. I sort, throw them in the washer with detergent, throw them in the dryer with a dryer sheet unless they're line-dry, then hang or fold them if I'm not feeling lazy.


Actually I mostly base my perceptions/whatever on what I see on this forum, since a) I don't frequent any other forums mainly inhabited by US folks, like this one, and b) living in the UK, I've never seen a commercial for US washing products in my life  ;D

magicdomino

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #161 on: March 19, 2014, 12:26:24 PM »
My light-colored clothes are food magnets, plus deodorant can build up and turn yellow in the underarms of shirts, so I do have a big stain problem.  (The dark clothes probably have stains too, but I'm not going to worry about what I can't see.)  Most of the food stains can be pre-treated when I take the clothes off, but some stuff like mustard and deodorant stains take more elbow grease.  Sooner or later, things get grungy enough to break out the Oxy Clean or Biz enzyme cleaner.  I try to avoid chlorine bleach for clothing.

Also, the kitchen linen wash (dish towels, dish cloths, cloth napkins) has lots of food stains, grease, probably germs.  That one is soaked in hot water and detergent overnight, then washed with chlorine bleach to kill the germs.  To be honest, the hot water probably sets as many stains as it removes, but it gets the grease out.

Laundry is probably the only household task that I don't mind, so that might be why I'm willing to spend more time on it.   :)

I think American laundries were originally located in a corner of the basement because that reduces visible clutter in the living areas, plus, as a previous poster mentioned, overflowing washers would cause less damage (Finished basements didn't really become common until the 1950's brought the basement recreation room.)  A lot of new construction within the last 10 or 20 years has the washer and dryer on the bedroom level because that is where most of the laundry is created and put away.


magicdomino

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #162 on: March 19, 2014, 12:34:12 PM »
The washer/dryer was always in its own room which was sometimes just a closet off the kitchen.  But it was still called a laundry room, even though a person couldn't enter.   I think the idea is to suppress the noise, and to be able to close the door to make the rest of the house look neater.  Whenever I have seen the washer and dryer not behind a closed door, it is in the kitchen and then there is an obsession with making it match the kitchen appliances. 
What I don't understand on the topic is the idea that the washer and dryer have to be a matched set.  So, when the washer dies, people buy a washer AND a dryer.

I never understood that either.  I could maybe understand if the appliances are located in a fairly visible place, and you are switching to a totally different model.  Since mine are tucked in a corner of the not-particularly-finshed basement, I don't care.

By the way, I tend to call it a laundry room, even though the area has no walls, just washer, dryer, and utility sink.  It used to be washer and sink, but I had the dryer moved from the opposite side of the basement.

zinzin

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #163 on: March 19, 2014, 12:57:33 PM »
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

Interesting, as I was taught to sort my clothing by my Scottish mother, who is also a consistent ironer (whereas I don't bother). I think you're seeing something that is true of people you know, and misattributing it as a UK thing.

And US or Canada, wherever I've lived, no laundry room, just the machines in the basement. Some people have them, but often because they've reno'd the basement and want to separate the new "living area" from the laundry stuff/bathroom/what have you.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2014, 01:02:10 PM by zinzin »

LadyClaire

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Re: Do you line dry your laundry?
« Reply #164 on: March 19, 2014, 01:00:15 PM »
In the UK:

Every residence I've ever even been in/seen online has the washer (and dryer, if present) in the kitchen, or in a utility room which is as near as possible to the kitchen. I've never seen a 'laundry room'. The closest thing would be a utility room, but that usually has all the laundry stuff, plus tools, dog food, garden implements, basically 'heavy duty' or dirty things that you don't want in the main house.

 (Utility rooms also don't always have a sink, and the sink is usually a 'dirty sink', for cleaning things like BBQ grills, I've never seen a special sink for laundry. )

To be honest, I've always thought that Americans make a huge pulaver out of doing a bit of washing. It's always depicted as some massive undertaking, with the need for a special room and all these special steps. (Sorting, washing, opening the lid to add rinse stuff, drying, folding...)

Everybody I know (including people with several young children) just chucks the clothes in the washer, takes them out, dries them, and throws them in the ironing basket until they can be bothered to iron them and hang them up (or if you're me, you just put stuff away when it's dry, I don't iron stuff unless I need to be smart).

The concept of 'laundry day', or needing a 'laundry room' is just silly to me, now that you can chuck it in the washer (which takes two minutes), and hang it out to dry (which takes 5 minutes). Even if I had several kids, I'd struggle to spend more than 20 mins a day on laundry, especially as most kids clothes don't need ironing.

Interesting, as I was taught to sort my clothing by my Scottish mother, who is also a consistent ironer (whereas I don't bother). I think you're seeing something that is true of people you know, and misattributing it as a UK thing.

My Mom, who is british, taught me how to sort laundry. She is a stickler for properly sorted clothes. When she was sick and I was doing laundry for her, I'd say "Ok, can I at least wash your pajamas and t-shirts together?" and that was a no-go because pajamas and t-shirts MUST be sorted into two separate loads, according to her.

I'm not as fastidious as she is when doing my own laundry, but I do sort my laundry according to material and color.