Author Topic: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?  (Read 14169 times)

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CakeEater

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Well, the prevailing advice here is that commercial baby food isn't nearly as good as making your own. Both have their place, I think. There was nothing so convenient as opening a jar of something while we were out. It keeps at room temp until you open it, it comes in little servings, you can just throw out the bottle afterwards instead of carrying a plastic container home and remembering to dig it out of the bag and wash it.

Real food is better for them and tastes better, I think. And the flavours are flavours that your family eats, so bub gets used to them.

Re: defrosting. Where are you supposed to defrost if not on the counter? In the fridge? That would take days, wouldn't it? I often have no idea what we're eating for dinner until I'm ready to start cooking, at which point I defrost in the microwave, but the counter works fine for me.

Psychopoesie

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About defrosting - I use the fridge and it doesn't take forever. With something big like a whole chook or a leg of lamb, I'd take it out of the freezer and put it into the fridge on Friday night if I was cooking it for Sunday lunch. For smaller things, like chops, I do it the night before, sometimes even the morning before, if it's for the evening meal.

If I'm in a hurry or forgot to take something I needed out of the freezer, I tend to use the defrost setting on the microwave. Not ideal but it works.

For stuff against prevailing advice:

I'm with those who don't prewash clothes or bed linen. Only exceptions have been dark jeans that looked like they'd stain my skin if I didn't wash them first.

I leave my bed unmade unless I have visitors or if I'm visiting someone else's house.

I don't tend to wash fruit and veg.

cicero

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One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.
that's what i did! i never really thought about - just assumed that everyone did the same thing. DS nursed for about 5-6 months, and then we started to feed him. we used to make "soup" - lots of veggies and turkey - and puree it, or just feed him off our plates. I bought a few jars of baby food here and there to have if we were leaving the house or something. plus, i love the pureed fruit ;)

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menley

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<snip>
Re: defrosting. Where are you supposed to defrost if not on the counter? In the fridge? That would take days, wouldn't it? I often have no idea what we're eating for dinner until I'm ready to start cooking, at which point I defrost in the microwave, but the counter works fine for me.

The three "recognized" ways are:
- in the fridge
- in a large bowl of cold water
- in the microwave

The first two are considered the safest; the third is still considered safe, although you're supposed to be careful with your settings and length of time so that you don't partially cook the meat.

The reason that it's not safe to thaw on the counter is that some parts of it thaw faster than others (generally the outside edges before the center) and the room temperature environment is perfect for massive bacterial growth. By thawing in the fridge or in cold water, you're making it thaw more uniformly and keeping the temperature out of the range for high bacteria growth. By thawing in the microwave, you're taking very little time (generally only a few minutes, versus several hours on the counter) so you're reducing the amount of time that the bacteria could grow.

CakeEater

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And how does cooking well kill the bacteria?

Yvaine

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And how does cooking well kill the bacteria?

The way a food service class explained it once so it finally made sense to me is, some bacteria produce toxins that stick around even if you've killed the bacteria itself. Botulism is an example, I think. So you kill all the botulism bacteria with heat, but if you let them grow too long in the first place, they've produced a toxin that's still hanging around in the food. It's not always the actual living organism that makes you sick.

menley

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o_gal

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For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.

VorFemme

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Obviously even inexpensive quality clothes in the UK are better quality than in the USA,  as I've never encountered any of those problems, or heard from friends of any such incidents, or read about it in any tabloid newspapers who just love that sort of thing.


I can see the headline now--"Man Wears New Clothes Without Washing--Turns Red in Armpits!"

I wash most (not all) new clothes because often the sizing or finishing on the fabric is stiff and a little irritating to my skin. Also, if the clothes need hemming, I want any shrinkage to happen before I hem them. It's not because I'm squicked by the idea of someone else having tried them on.

What is really bad is when the dye is black...or green...green can actually look stranger.

Ambrosia Hino (DD) is sensitive to dyes & scents - Paternal Grandma used to insist on her wearing outfits while they were NEW so they looked "perfect" and would not wash fabric if she sewed something because Grandma liked the "crisp" feel of the fabric. 

One of the chemicals used in treating some fabrics is formaldehyde.  But other chemicals can cause issues with someone who is sensitive to chemicals in general, not just dyes, perfumes, and fabric finishes.

This is one of those situations where an individual's preferences may supercede other considerations - unless they are medical in nature.

I don't MIND buying used clothes from a thrift store - but I tend to have them cleaned before wearing them (washed & dried - I rarely buy dry clean only clothes that HAVE to be dry cleaned). 

Although I have one lovely glittery evening outfit that will be much less glittery if it ever gets washed in the sink.  I know this because the skirt is already less glittery from where I sat on it while eating dinner & driving (I can see the missing glitter in my car to this day).....
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 08:53:09 AM by VorFemme »
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

lowspark

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I made my own baby food when my kids were babies. It was pretty easy. Just bought veggies, boiled them and then puréed them in the food processor. Froze them in ice cube trays as mentioned above. Yes, it was way cheaper, plus everything was fresh and there was nothing added that I didn't add.

There's a lot to be said for convenience so I can see using jarred baby food but I like to cook so boiling some squash or carrots or whatever while I was already in the kitchen making dinner wasn't much extra trouble.

VorFemme

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Someone said
"I have worn new clothes without washing first"

it would never occur to me that new clothes need to be/should be washed before you wear them? 

To borrow a well known Ehell phrase "Why would I want to do that?"



There are fabric finishes from the factory that involve various chemicals - depending on your particular sensitivities - washing them might be required for comfort (makes some people itchy) - other people want the psychological comfort of knowing that the clothes really are CLEAN before they wear them (not just try them on).

And I remember a real case where someone had a drug trip for years because their clothing & suitcase got soaked in some kind of drug concentrate, it dried, and they wore it....and their skin absorbed it.  What I don't remember was if they had any choice in wearing the clothes as they came out of the suit case - hotels forty years ago did not have free guest laundry facilities and dry cleaning takes time & money - if they had a meeting to go to, they may have had to get dressed & GO to it.

And not all chemicals would have left an obvious stain or odor...the only reason it was noticed is that things were slightly damp but dried out overnight....and I remember reading the story in the Readers' Digest - I just don't remember when.  Other than over twenty and probably over thirty years ago.

I remember that one, VorFemme! It was PCP, wasn't it? And he nearly got committed for mental problems and/or arrested for drug use. It kept coming back because it wouldn't come out with normal washing.

I seem remember that he had been a pilot & lost his job & pilot's license due to the hallucinations that he was getting.  I think that he was also a reservist in the military and was going to be court martialed for drug use because nobody had ever heard of someone getting drugged through absorption through the skin from something spilled on their clothing....I don't remember if he had been the pilot on the trip where the stuff spilled on his clothing or if he was a passenger at the time.

I sometimes wonder if drug patches in common use NOW stem from research after that incident by someone who wondered if it would work for controlling dosage of other drugs....or was it just coincidence & nothing to do with some researcher reading about the case?
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 08:54:53 AM by VorFemme »
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

ladyknight1

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On the fabric softener subject, I use fabric softener on towels, sheets and blankets because we have hard water and it makes them feel like cardboard without it. My in-laws use powdered detergent and no fabric softener and it hurts to use their towels. We take our own if going over there for some reason.

I never use fabric softener on clothing, since most of DH and DS's clothing and some of mine are tech fabrics and the wicking fabric has to breathe in order to work properly. Fabric softener clogs the pores of the fabric.

Lynn2000

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One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.
that's what i did! i never really thought about - just assumed that everyone did the same thing. DS nursed for about 5-6 months, and then we started to feed him. we used to make "soup" - lots of veggies and turkey - and puree it, or just feed him off our plates. I bought a few jars of baby food here and there to have if we were leaving the house or something. plus, i love the pureed fruit ;)

Yeah, for me, since I don't have kids or think about kids much, my only exposure to baby food was seeing all the different kinds available at the store, and occasionally glimpsing books that claimed to teach you how to make your own. I guess looking back it's more about marketing to different audiences and lifestyles, but at the time I assumed it was because commercial baby food is "best" inherently, and that if you're going to take on the Herculean task of making it yourself, you're gonna need a lot of instructions! I honestly never thought about it being just... pureed regular food. Like what people fed babies a hundred years ago.

Not that I think it's a racket or anything, the convenience is very appealing to some people, and probably also the variety--for example, my mom hates most vegetables, but she always fed me lots of baby food squash, lima beans, carrots, etc. because that was healthier for me as a baby. But I can see where she wouldn't have wanted to buy a lot of squash or lima beans fresh, just to puree a little for me, because the rest would've gone to waste.
~Lynn2000

Dindrane

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One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.

It's kind of a neat concept, since they're much easier to travel with than little jars, and because they're sort of a self-limiting thing. My brother and SIL determined that once the child was old enough to eat out of the pouch efficiently they no longer needed to be eating from them at all on a regular basis. So my niece (who is 3) will suck the puree out really quickly and even use her hands to flatten the pouch and get as much of it as possible. Thus, she only gets those for like emergency we-are-on-a-plane food, but otherwise is expected to eat more or less adult food. Plus, she can totally handle not-very-cut-up raw fruit and vegetables at this point, so she really doesn't need to be eating them in pureed form.

My nephew (who is 1) is way less coordinated, and takes way longer to finish one, because he only sort of grasps the concept. They still don't give him the pouches when they can make him other food (because they cost more than just cutting up adult food or bananas or making him peanut butter sandwiches), but he does eat them more regularly when they're out and about or just need to give him something quick.


dawbs

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One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.
*snip*

YOu can also buy refillable pouches.
I don't use them all the time (because the whole POINT, to me, of the pouches is something shelf-stable that's stashed in the bottom of the bag as 'emergency food'), but for road trips and the like, it's still very useful.  (applesauce or yogurt in these:  http://squishysnakpak.com/home .  The bottom is ziploc like.  We haven't had her open the bottom--yet :) )