Author Topic: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?  (Read 16249 times)

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siamesecat2965

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. I use a scent- and dye-free detergent in the washer, but I don't use anything in the dryer--I don't even really understand the concept of dryer sheets. I rarely have problems with static electricity--only with one skirt which might be wool or wool blend, and then only on very dry days. And, I don't like the smell of fabric softener/dryer sheets, or the way it makes my towels feel funny and absorb less. 

A little while ago, for a treat, I bought myself some super-luxurious washcloths. They are 820 grams. I don't really care for them.   

I'm the same way! I use that type of detergent and even the unscented dryer sheets leave some odor that I can detect. The smell really bothers me. I prefer just the smell of clean on my clothes.

I only use washcloths for my face, so I buy the cheap, thin ones you can buy in packs of 5-10. I use them, wash them, and chuck them when they get threadbare. SOme of the nicer ones are also too thick for me to wring out properly too, which is why I prefer the thinner "cheaper" variety.

lowspark

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I quit using dryer sheets a few years ago. I didn't notice any difference without them. I do have things cling, oh, once in about 50 washes, but not enough that I feel I need sheets anymore.

Back when I did use them, I would use a sheet 2-3 times before throwing it away. I think that's what convinced me to quit using them altogether. Regardless of how many times I'd use a sheet, the results were the same.

mbbored

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On the fabric softener subject, I use fabric softener on towels, sheets and blankets because we have hard water and it makes them feel like cardboard without it. My in-laws use powdered detergent and no fabric softener and it hurts to use their towels. We take our own if going over there for some reason.

I never use fabric softener on clothing, since most of DH and DS's clothing and some of mine are tech fabrics and the wicking fabric has to breathe in order to work properly. Fabric softener clogs the pores of the fabric.

Interesting. I have incredibly hard water and never use fabric softener, but my towels are fine. However, I use either homemade detergent or an all natural one that's designed to completely dissolve and wash off. I read that most commercial detergents call for using more than you really need and leave residues that build up, which leaves towels stiff.

ladyknight1

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They use Tide powdered that comes in a giant box and takes over 6 months for them to use. I wonder if they use too much or it is just the formulation. I would have never believed a fluffy towel washed 100 times in detergent would end up as sandpaper/cardboard. They don't absorb water at all, so don't work well for that whole drying purpose.

Harriet Jones

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Maybe if they used white vinegar in the rinse cycle it would help. 

magicdomino

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I quit using dryer sheets a few years ago. I didn't notice any difference without them. I do have things cling, oh, once in about 50 washes, but not enough that I feel I need sheets anymore.

Back when I did use them, I would use a sheet 2-3 times before throwing it away. I think that's what convinced me to quit using them altogether. Regardless of how many times I'd use a sheet, the results were the same.

Interesting. Some kinds of my clothing -- mostly the synthetic fabrics -- can get some static even in humid summers so I use a dryer sheet cut in half in those loads.  Towels and sheets don't get fabric softener of any kind.  The towels usually aren't too bad, but at this time of year the sheets can get pretty electrified.  Making the bed is loads of fun when you have a wrought iron bed and are putting out sparks like tinfoil in a microwave.   :)

MommyPenguin

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For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.

I do this as well.  In my case, I keep changing the hot water every time it cools down (usually several times in the first few minutes, then just a few additional times).  It thaws still really quickly, which is great when you aren't so good at remembering to plan ahead, like me.  Even the cold water bath or sitting the food out on the counter doesn't do much when it's already 4pm.

Ms_Cellany

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For smaller cuts of meat, like chicken legs, steaks, chops - use hot water: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/thaw-your-steaks-quickly-and-safely-in-100-degree-water and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/dining/a-hot-water-bath-for-thawing-meats-the-curious-cook.html?_r=0

I've been doing that for years and was glad to finally see it verified as safe.

I do this as well.  In my case, I keep changing the hot water every time it cools down (usually several times in the first few minutes, then just a few additional times).  It thaws still really quickly, which is great when you aren't so good at remembering to plan ahead, like me.  Even the cold water bath or sitting the food out on the counter doesn't do much when it's already 4pm.

I put the (bagged) frozen item in a mixing bowl or large tupperware, fill with hot water, and put under a faucet just trickling hot water.
Using a chainsaw is as close as we come to having a lightsaber in this life.

alkira6

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One of the things that I think is pretty nifty are baby food pouches. My brother and SIL have been feeding those to their kids for awhile, although they do severely taper them off as the kids get older. They're basically pureed fruits/vegetables in a plastic pouch that has a spout thing you can suck on, or that the puree can be squeezed out of. So when the kids were little, they'd sometimes squeeze a bit of the pouch out and use a spoon for feeding, but eventually just started handing the pouch to the kids to suck the food out of directly.
*snip*

YOu can also buy refillable pouches.
I don't use them all the time (because the whole POINT, to me, of the pouches is something shelf-stable that's stashed in the bottom of the bag as 'emergency food'), but for road trips and the like, it's still very useful.  (applesauce or yogurt in these:  http://squishysnakpak.com/home .  The bottom is ziploc like.  We haven't had her open the bottom--yet :) )


I actually buy the fruit purees for myself in the pouch.  Very convenient and with coupons the baby food pouches are cheaper that the grownup versions and come in more flavor combinations.

Ceallach

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One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.

I didn't even bother puree'ing it most of the time, I just let the kid suck on it or mushed it with a fork before feeding it to him.   But since he was 6 months old (and started grabbing) he has just eaten exactly what we eat, and still does.  I don't have time to prepare a kids meal and an adults meal, I can barely manage one!

Store baby food is really just convenience food like anything else.  I used shop bought baby food because I'm time poor, not for any other reason.  It's very pure here, not even preservatives etc in it.   Just veges/fruit maybe some pasta or meat.    But supposedly making your own is still better because it's fresher.    The "prevailing advice" is actually to make your own baby food.  (Here at least, it may differ elsewhere). 
"Nobody can do everything, but everybody can do something"


mbbored

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They use Tide powdered that comes in a giant box and takes over 6 months for them to use. I wonder if they use too much or it is just the formulation. I would have never believed a fluffy towel washed 100 times in detergent would end up as sandpaper/cardboard. They don't absorb water at all, so don't work well for that whole drying purpose.

It's probably a mixture of both. When I switched from commercial products (All Free & Clear), I read to try washing your towels without adding detergent a few times. There was so much detergent built up on my towels, it took 5 loads before the water stopped getting soapy.

Marga

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There was an Law & Order:SVU episode where a someone died because the clothes they were wearing had been recycled from a funeral home and they were soaked in embalming fluid.

I remember reading in a book, something about medical mysteries, a case where jeans for boys were purchased at a salvage auction, and all that wore them, got very ill, aside from one. The reason they were salvaged, was during shipment, a drum of some liquid had spilled on them, so they were ruined, and sold for cheap. turns out it was some nasty pesticide, and the one boy who didn't get sick, his mom had washed them first before he wore them.

This was also an episode of House, IIRC.
There was an episode in Strong Medicine, but they were women's jeans.

Marga

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I also wash new clothes, sheets, etc. before use, but my mom doesn't--she likes the "new" feeling. Eh, to each their own.

I always wash new clothes before I wear them, because I don't like the feel and smell of them otherwise. This used to be much worse in the (far, far) past, when they positively reeked, but the habit has remained.

One that amazed me was that my friend Amy just pureed regular food to feed her two kids. She did introduce new foods carefully, because they have food allergies in her family, but otherwise it was just what she and her DH were having for dinner, but put in the blender. And it wasn't complex recipes with special supplements or anything like that. I kept looking at the aisles and aisles of commercial baby food going, "Isn't there... stuff in the commercial food that babies need? That's not in regular food? Like... baby vitamins?" and she said no. Obviously for some people the commercial food is fine and more convenient, but she found it worth her while to puree regular food and use that instead.

I never bought any baby food for my kids and my daughter never did for hers either. It's just as easy to feed them what you're eating anyway, and way cheaper. Plus you know exactly what's in it. And you're friend is right: commercial baby food is not about what's better for the baby, it's just about convenience.

Slartibartfast

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We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

magicdomino

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We let Bittybartfast stay up as late as she wants.  Babybartfast has a bedtime because she has to be off to kindergarten in the morning, but Bittybartfast stays up until she gets sleepy (which she communicates by rattling the baby gate to go upstairs to her room) or she starts fussing.  Sometimes that's nine or ten o'clock.  The nice thing, though, is that she sleeps in until mid-morning.  I do my best writing after midnight - not sure why, but that seems to be how I'm wired - so I stay up late to work most nights.  DH gets Babybartfast off to school early, then leaves for work, then Bittybartfast and I get up a few hours later.  It kind of feels like I'm working second shift, but I'm really glad both my girls are night owls like me!

Switch the parents around, and you have the situation when I was little.  My father worked evening shift.  So, Mom would get up early to get herself and my brothers out of the house.  Just before they left, Dad would get up, get dressed, then take care of me with the house quiet and the single bathroom available. :)   I can remember the TV station signing off for the night, so some nights I was up as late as midnight.