Author Topic: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?  (Read 14750 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

Me too.

Me three. I also lick the beaters when making cake, which also contains raw eggs.

StarFaerie

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I pop my pimples. If I don't they stay painful for weeks and then leave a cyst type bump, if I do they are gone in a day.

Mikayla

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Add me to the people who thaw meat on the counter! I can't ever remember to get meat out the 3 days it takes to thaw anything in the fridge.

I also wear clothes without washing (except underwear, I always wash that, and I wash my kids clothes before they wear them.)

I eat cookie dough with raw egg in it. I figure lots of other things have raw/not fully cooked eggs in them that are acceptable to eat so why not cookie dough? :)

I agree and I'd also add corn bread batter.  On more than one occasion, I've eaten so much I had to start over with a new batch!

I'm a little careless about a lot of safety instructions.  Obviously, this applies to cooking for myself, not guests.  The other day, my roomie found an almost full jar of Hellman's that expired in Jan of 2013.  She was about to throw it out and I snagged it.  It's fine. 

Also, I cook a lot of frozen chickens in a crockpot and I've never had a problem with it (the warnings are about how long it stays at a room temperature). 

The only thing I'm adamant about is "use or freeze by" dates on meat.  I'll toss that in a heartbeat if I'm even one day past it. 

pinkflamingo

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I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.


I read an article just yesterday about cold weather car care tips and the mechanic interviewed for the column said that you don't need to warm up your car at all unless it's really cold and even then it only take a couple of minutes. He said that warming up the car for 10-15 minutes is more for the comfort of the driver (heating up the interior of the car) than taking care of the engine. Actually driving the car does a better job of warming it up than letting it idle for long periods of time. So, it seems that you're doing the right thing!

I don't do that, either, so I felt vindicated when I read this.

Outdoor Girl

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It is especially true if you use synthetic oil.  The viscosity doesn't change nearly as much as oil when the temperature drops so you only need 10-15 seconds before you start moving if it is really cold.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

siamesecat2965

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I do lots of things perhaps I "shouldn't"

I don't warm up my car, as in the engine, even when its frigid out. I will turn it on, but to defrost and scrape the windows. So it does warm up that way.  But if its cold, and i don't need to do that, i get in, start it up, and drive off. I've never ever had ANY issue becasue I don't.


I read an article just yesterday about cold weather car care tips and the mechanic interviewed for the column said that you don't need to warm up your car at all unless it's really cold and even then it only take a couple of minutes. He said that warming up the car for 10-15 minutes is more for the comfort of the driver (heating up the interior of the car) than taking care of the engine. Actually driving the car does a better job of warming it up than letting it idle for long periods of time. So, it seems that you're doing the right thing!

I don't do that, either, so I felt vindicated when I read this.

I had read or heard something about this too, but I do it out of laziness. I am not a morning person, so I very rarely have time to sit and let it idle to warm the engine up. 

I bought a new car (new to me anyway) last spring, and wow, I am so thrilled as to how quickly the windows defrost etc. I'm loving it. I can even wash them, when the temp is below freezing, and it won't ice over, while driving. As long as i have the defroster on high, for a few mintues. which is helpful now since there is so much salt and stuff on the road, and my windshield gets dirty pretty fast.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2014, 03:17:23 PM by siamesecat2965 »

Sirius

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We also, at least partially, thaw meat and poultry on the counter.  We have small utility room where our furnace and hot water heater are located.  That's also a place we use for thawing.  Meat certainly goes into the fridge overnight but, when we're home to monitor it, the counter or the utility room works just fine.

Mine gets thawed in the microwave--not in an 'on' microwave, just, in the microwave.
Because it's the only cat-proof 'counter' space in the house. :-[ :P

That's the main reason why I thaw things in the refrigerator, after my little darlings found a package of chicken in a grocery bag I hadn't unloaded yet and had a snack.  Very expensive snack for the cats, I might add.

ladyknight1

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I crack my knuckles.

lowspark

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I think the wine advice got misunderstood somewhere.   You shouldn't cook with wine that is not of drinking quality, not wine you wouldn't drink because you just don't like the flavor.   They mean different things. The wine advice is really referring to not using cheap nasty stuff that is labeled as "cooking wine" and since it's usually is shelved with the vinegar, that should tell you something.

I also don't separate my colors either as I just wash everything in cold .  I do separate my  delicate weight items and either do a separate  load or toss them in a lingerie bag. I do wash new brightly colored items alone and with white vinegar to help set the colors.

Well, yeah, I know that "cooking wine" is like the nastiest stuff and you should never cook with it. But I really do think that they mean regular wine too.

For example, here's an article from Wine Enthusiast about cooking with wine:
http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/

From the article (bolding mine):
Quote
The Quality Consideration: You may be hesitant to cook with your most prized red wine but be careful not to use absolute plonk in your dishes. If you wouldn’t drink it on its own, do not cook with it! Cook with a basic bottle that you might enjoy in a casual setting.

And another site which actually has two separate paragraphs about it, one for "cooking wine" and one for "wine you wouldn't drink".
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/
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Avoid using cooking wines.
Clearly there are far better choices than so-called "cooking Sherry" or other liquids commonly billed as "cooking wine." These are made of a thin, cheap base wine to which salt and food coloring have been added.

Never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink.
A poor quality wine with sour or bitter flavors will only contribute those flavors to the dish. Julia Child once said, "If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one." It's worth the investment to buy a quality wine. Just don't forget to sip a little as you stir.

So yeah, the conventional wisdom is, if you buy a bottle to drink, take a sip and don't like it, toss it. Whereas in my kitchen, that wine goes into the fridge and I use it within a couple of days for cooking.

BeagleMommy

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I also thaw meat on the counter.  Once it is thawed I put it in the fridge.

I crack my knuckles (and other body parts) regularly.  Years ago, my mother and grandmother insisted that doing so would cause "big" knuckles.  I found an article a few years ago that explained the crack was actually an air bubble/pocket in the joint and that cracking was actually good for you.

Katana_Geldar

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Once a meal is finished, we usually leave covered leftovers on the counter until they're cool enough to store in the fridge.  Then, we  pack them into freezer safe containers, label them and put them away until we want them again. In 30 years of our marriage nothing has spoiled.
I do this too, things are too hot to sit in the fridge sometimes.

lowspark

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Yeah I crack my knuckles too. It's an old wives' tale about your knuckles getting big. I've been doing it my whole life and all my knuckles are normal size.

This might be TMI but I not only crack my fingers (both joints), but also my elbows, wrists, toes and knees. And sometimes my ankles.

ladyknight1

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My chiropractor cracks everything else, I just crack my knuckles!  ;D

shhh its me

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Yeah I crack my knuckles too. It's an old wives' tale about your knuckles getting big. I've been doing it my whole life and all my knuckles are normal size.

This might be TMI but I not only crack my fingers (both joints), but also my elbows, wrists, toes and knees. And sometimes my ankles.

Add jaw , hips and shoulders.

I also eat batter , thaw on the counter and wait till food has cold to store it.

I wont even try dairy after the expiration date but thats because I'm sensitive to bad smells and have a really strong "reflex"

Sirius

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Regarding cooking with wine:  I don't drink alcohol, but I have cooked with it, and I usually go for what's cheapest, which works for me.  I know that "cooking wine" has a lot of salt in it, so I don't use it.  I also know that I should use red wine with beef. 

I haven't killed anyone yet, so I must be doing something right.