Author Topic: What works perfectly fine for you even though it goes against prevailing advice?  (Read 15100 times)

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AzaleaBloom

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I also thaw meat on the counter if I forget to put it in the fridge the night before.  From what I understand, as long you cook it properly, it will be fine.


veryfluffy

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I have washed my hair almost every day for the past 40 years. It's shiny, healthy, and down past my waist. (But I don't use a blow dryer or any heating appliance.)

I have never heard of washing new clothes before you wear them.

I am perfectly happy to eat raw eggs in ice cream, cake batter or mayonnaise. One of the best things about baking is licking the cake batter off the beaters.
   

magicdomino

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A lot of fellow daredevils here.   >:D 

My mother had some interesting notions about food safety.  As a result, I'm pretty immunized against food poisioning.  So, yes, leftovers on the counter until cool; I have a week to eat the leftovers; expiration dates are a recommendation, not a law (I have faith in preservatives.   ;) ); a little raw egg won't hurt me.  Dubious seafood will though, so I am very careful about that.

metallicafan

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Count me in with those who thaw meat on the kitchen counter and who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter.   
I also let things cool a bit before putting in the fridge.

MrTango

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I also thaw meat on the counter if I forget to put it in the fridge the night before.  From what I understand, as long you cook it properly, it will be fine.

An even faster way to thaw meat: put it in a sealed zip-top bag and set it in a bowl in the sink. Fill the bowl with lukewarm water, and then set the water to cool and run it at just a bare trickle.  Water will thaw meat much more quickly than air, and the movement caused by that bare trickle will make it even faster than just sitting in water.

This method does waste some water, so I only do it in urgent situations.

Hmmmmm

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I think the wine advice got misunderstood somewhere.   You shouldn't cook with wine that is not of drinking quality, not wine you wouldn't drink because you just don't like the flavor.   They mean different things. The wine advice is really referring to not using cheap nasty stuff that is labeled as "cooking wine" and since it's usually is shelved with the vinegar, that should tell you something.

I also don't separate my colors either as I just wash everything in cold .  I do separate my  delicate weight items and either do a separate  load or toss them in a lingerie bag. I do wash new brightly colored items alone and with white vinegar to help set the colors.

Well, yeah, I know that "cooking wine" is like the nastiest stuff and you should never cook with it. But I really do think that they mean regular wine too.

For example, here's an article from Wine Enthusiast about cooking with wine:
http://www.winemag.com/cooking-with-wine/

From the article (bolding mine):
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The Quality Consideration: You may be hesitant to cook with your most prized red wine but be careful not to use absolute plonk in your dishes. If you wouldn’t drink it on its own, do not cook with it! Cook with a basic bottle that you might enjoy in a casual setting.

And another site which actually has two separate paragraphs about it, one for "cooking wine" and one for "wine you wouldn't drink".
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/cooking-with-wine-00400000001386/
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Avoid using cooking wines.
Clearly there are far better choices than so-called "cooking Sherry" or other liquids commonly billed as "cooking wine." These are made of a thin, cheap base wine to which salt and food coloring have been added.

Never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink.
A poor quality wine with sour or bitter flavors will only contribute those flavors to the dish. Julia Child once said, "If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one." It's worth the investment to buy a quality wine. Just don't forget to sip a little as you stir.

So yeah, the conventional wisdom is, if you buy a bottle to drink, take a sip and don't like it, toss it. Whereas in my kitchen, that wine goes into the fridge and I use it within a couple of days for cooking.

I agree that they mean more than just cooking wine. And I agree that I might buy a wine that I open and think, nope, and I end up using later in the week for cooking. But it's usually only when it's a small amount compared to other ingredients.

But I am particular about what wine I'll use for a dish like beef bourguignon because the wine is such a major flavor component. But I'm still not pouring in a $20 bottle of wine. It'll be a "table" wine that I enjoy.

Lynn2000

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I love me some raw cookie dough and cake batter. Except for cookie dough/cake batter I am overly-cautious about food contamination and expiration, which I think just shows that my principles can be bought for the right price...  ;D

I also wash my hair every night--I know my mom only does it every other night, but I didn't know every night was against prevailing advice. We also both shower at night instead of first thing in the morning, which some people seem to think is weird. And I don't own a hair dryer, which my mom thinks is weird--she shudders at the idea of me going to bed with wet hair, but she's always cold and I'm usually warm.

I separate lights and darks when doing laundry, but that's it. I actually don't even look at the washing label on the clothes--I couldn't even tell you what temperature my washer is set to. Medium? I never change it. I also don't even own an iron... either all my clothes are made of wrinkle-free material or people are just too kind to tell me I look rumpled. :)

Also I think there are things you aren't really supposed to put in the dishwasher, like pots and cookie sheets maybe, but I put everything in, because I hate washing dishes. They all come out well enough for me.

Looking over this list I am just a seriously lazy person.  :P That is definitely what drives most of these actions, rather than some kind of philosophical choice...
~Lynn2000

katycoo

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I usually thaw meat in the microwave, occasionally in the sink.

I pretty much never pre-wash new clothes before wearing.

I machine wash a heap of things I apparently shouldn't.

Use by dates are a guide.  Smell/taste tests are way more reliable - note there is a limit on this.  Dairy several months old, I trust to be bad.  Phyllo that is supposed to be used in a week - I'll check it out before I throw it away.

menley

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Oy, I'm wincing at all of the people that thaw meat on the counter!

One of the "approved" ways to thaw meat is in water, and I actually tested it versus thawing on the counter and thawing in the fridge (my house growing up was full of science nerds, hah). Thawing in cold water was by far the fastest of the three, although you do need to change out the water every 30 minutes to keep it cold. It usually takes me only an hour and it's by far a better option than letting it thaw on the counter with variable temps.

Bluenomi

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Another fan of the cat proof microwave defrost method here. She'll eat still frozen chicken if she can get her paws on it.

shhh its me

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Oy, I'm wincing at all of the people that thaw meat on the counter!

One of the "approved" ways to thaw meat is in water, and I actually tested it versus thawing on the counter and thawing in the fridge (my house growing up was full of science nerds, hah). Thawing in cold water was by far the fastest of the three, although you do need to change out the water every 30 minutes to keep it cold. It usually takes me only an hour and it's by far a better option than letting it thaw on the counter with variable temps.

ITs easier to cut frozen/partial frozen meat so I tend to do the dicing/slicing etc about 20 minutes after I take it out of the freezer.  It thaws pretty fast then. 

OH here is a related one ...I'll toss a frozen roast in for soup or cook ground round for chili still partially frozen by flipping the frozen side to the bottom of the pan and breaking off the cooked bit.  Yeah I sometimes forget to take it out of the freezer until about 15 minutes before I should start cooking.

Mergatroyd

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I thaw meat on the counter, if I remember to pull it out. Most times, I just cook from frozen. Roasted chicken, pork, beef, etc all taste exactly the same and take no longer than when I thaw it first. Stuff that has to be cooked on the stovetop gets boiled, it tastes fine too. But then, how hard is it to screw up spaghetti sauce, stew, or sausages??


asb8

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I've been snacking on the cookie dough/cake batter/brownie batter for years without any ill effects

Leftovers cool on the counter before going in the fridge

Pimpled must be popped immediately or they won't leave

perpetua

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I wash my face with shower gel and water; I haven't cleansed, toned and moisturised since I was a teen. Of course I do have EDS and the velvet-soft skin that goes with it, so I guess I'm cheating a bit  ;D But still - works for me.

Bobbie

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I live in the US Northwest and thaw my turkey in the barbeque (it fits).  I also use the back porch like a refrigerator in the winter if I need more room.

I turn a bowl over the thawing meat so the cat doesn't think its died and gone to yummy goodness heaven.

Isn't the part of making cookies the taste testing involved before and after baking  ;)

I will pop blister, a pimple, and a blackhead before its time.

I don't rinse and repeat, once is enough.