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  • July 05, 2015, 08:59:19 AM

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Author Topic: top layer of wedding cake  (Read 5245 times)

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Mommyoops

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2014, 01:03:53 PM »
We ate our top tier a week after our wedding. Our baker provided a fresh cake on our year anniversary.

katycoo

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2014, 07:27:18 PM »
Its still done by some people. I had wedding cake at the christening of a friend's child recently which had kept well.  I personally did not do this as I did not have a tiered cake, nor the freezer space come to think of it.

Bottlecaps

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #32 on: December 11, 2014, 08:19:32 PM »
The top layer of our cake is residing in our freezer currently, awaiting consumption on August 30, 2015. :) I'm hoping it still tastes good!
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gellchom

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2015, 11:17:26 PM »
We did it, in 1982 and 1983.  My mom had it in her freezer, and we all enjoyed it for a fun breakfast.  It still tasted good, IIRC.

My son and daughter-in-law saved theirs in our freezer, but there was a week-long power outage here, too, so it had to be thrown out -- too bad; that was the yummiest cake I'd ever tasted.  My daughter and son-in-law just wanted to have a tiny cake to cut, with sheet cakes in the kitchen.  But our very sweet caterer gave them a pretty two-layer cake as a gift, so there was a lot left over.  We just ate the leftovers for a week rather than freeze any, because they live overseas and are unlikely to be here for their first anniversary.

It is a nuisance of freezer space usage.   I like the idea of the bakery giving you a little cake for your first anniversary.

jazzgirl205

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #34 on: April 24, 2015, 05:04:47 PM »
We did it in the late 80s.  I don't remember how it tasted so couldn't have been that bad.

mandycorn

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #35 on: May 01, 2015, 10:52:14 AM »
Both my sisters saved theirs in my mom's huge chest freezer, since they both moved a fair amount during their first years of marriage.

The first sister to get married had their cake made by her former girl scout leader who's a semi-pro cake baker, and we're pretty sure it was a boxed mix (white and chocolate marbled, I believe). It got wrapped in (lots and lots of) layers of plastic wrap and foil and did okay. They said it was edible but not fantastic, which is what I would expect from frozen boxed cake.

My youngest sister got married in May of 2014, so their cake is still in the freezer and I'm sort of nervous about it, since I was the one that wrapped it for her - my grandma got sick a few days after the wedding so my mom flew out to be with her for almost a month and a half, so a lot of the final clean-up tasks kind of fell to me, since we didn't know how long mom would be gone. Her cake came from a local grocery store, so it's slightly denser, but probably won't have frozen much better than the other one.

I wonder if the use of fondant would help preserve frozen cakes any, since it seems like it would do a better job sealing in the moisture than standard buttercream. (I'm a fondant peeler when I eat cake, though, so I would just peel it off after freezing/thawing). No chance for testing that theory here, since both my sisters hate fondant.

I did have a huge dense chocolate-espresso cake I baked for fun and I froze most of it because I couldn't eat it all myself. It actually did beautifully in the freezer. I think part of why it did so well was the dense texture, and the fact that I wrapped each slice separately, so they froze and thawed more quickly. When I wanted a slice, I would microwave it to thaw and warm it up. It started to melt the frosting, so it wasn't very pretty, but it tasted good because it was warm. Because of that, I'm wondering if individually wrapped slices of wedding cake would do better than a whole tier too.
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Twik

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #36 on: May 12, 2015, 01:21:58 PM »
It can't be a tradition of *very* long standing, because freezers have not been around that long (historically speaking).
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Nibsey

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2015, 02:11:52 PM »
It can't be a tradition of *very* long standing, because freezers have not been around that long (historically speaking).

I think the tradition is from the 19th century and why fruitcake was used, as it would last a year.
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Mommyoops

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #38 on: May 12, 2015, 03:46:58 PM »
we ate our top tier on our one week anniversary. Our bakery provided a fresh cake on our anniversary.

Paper Roses

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #39 on: May 12, 2015, 05:21:22 PM »
we ate our top tier on our one week anniversary. Our bakery provided a fresh cake on our anniversary.

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suzieQ

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2015, 11:16:01 PM »
Our top layer was chocolate because it's my favorite and it freezes well. We ate it a year later  it was fine.
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mandycorn

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #41 on: May 13, 2015, 12:50:07 PM »
My sister and brother in law just ate their cake and said it was fine. My mom made fun of me for all the layers of foil and plastic wrap I used wrapping it up, but once it thawed, it wasn't freezer-burned and wasn't dry, so I'm counting it as a win :)
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cicero

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #42 on: May 26, 2015, 04:29:01 AM »
who else has that image of elaine eating the historical wedding cake from one of the british kings

My first wedding was in the early 1980s, at the time the wedding venues "gave" the cake as a freebie and it was always some disgusting margarine-laden concoction (i live in israel and due to kosher rules, no outside cakes were allowed, and the cake couldn't be dairy if a meat meal was served). Anyway i didn't really care about the cake, or other wedding trappings.. my grandma said we have to take it home and freeze it, which my mom did and as i recall nobody ate it...

My second wedding was in the late 1990s, we didn't have a cake, but rather pretty petit fours and little desserts for dessert. that was perfect.

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Another Sarah

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Re: top layer of wedding cake
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2015, 08:42:37 AM »
It can't be a tradition of *very* long standing, because freezers have not been around that long (historically speaking).

I think the tradition is from the 19th century and why fruitcake was used, as it would last a year.
In a lot of traditional recipes for Christmas cake, you're actually supposed to make it a year in advance and store it. the alcohol keeps it moist and it's supposed to mature over the year - traditional Christmas pudding and mincemeat are both the same.

I also heard the christening variant but as the middle tier - large tier for wedding guests, middle tier for christening cake, top tier for anniversary