Author Topic: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)  (Read 59029 times)

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Ryuugan80

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Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« on: February 05, 2014, 05:09:41 PM »
BG: I tend to lurk on Customers Suck and I was reading an interesting thread there. The gist of it was that the OP had noticed that they weren't scheduled for Black Friday and thus chose to make plans for the day. Their boss calls later (a day or two before, IIRC) asking/telling the OP to come in for that day because they realized that they would be understaffed otherwise. And they were shocked and sincerely confused at the refusal to come in. This, apparently, was a company that tended to schedule you for more hours now and cut them later in the week, so the OP wouldn't even be making extra money by going in on the busiest day of the year.

So, congrazzles if you've made it through all of that. Apparently that sort of thing happens a lot, people expecting your undying loyalty without having earned it. Whether it's employers or acquaintances/family/etc that treat their people like large indelicate-smelling piles of plant fertilizer yet expect those same people to bend over backwards for them, but are hand-over-chest-and-gasp shocked when those people refuse or quit/cut ties.

Any interesting stories to tell?
"Yo, those kids are straight up liars, man. All I told them to do was run product. And by product, I mean chewing gum."  - Lie to Me

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Alli8098

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2014, 05:42:23 PM »
When I was working retail part-time after I lost my full-time job when the economy crashed I suffered a couple of instances with the company and other employees demanding my loyalty.  I told them that I could not work Sundays (they closed early on Sundays anyway).  It's a religious thing, and I was also going to school at the time so that was really my one day off from everything to attend church and be with my husband and daughter.  They had no problem accommodating that until a few months later when I was scheduled a Sunday and grudgingly went in after complaining to the scheduling manager.  I said I could do this one time but not again.  And I never was scheduled for a Sunday again.  But some of us that were hired in the winter were getting our hours cut down to 12 hours a week while the new summer hires were getting more shifts.

With the other employees I frequently would pick up their shifts if something came up like Dr. Appointments and such.  I had no problem with this, my husband was unemployed at the time and I had a child to feed.  However when management suddenly lost my time off request so I could attend my own college graduation and spend one day with my mother who flew in from out of town no one could switch with me.  Not even the one gal who I had covered many many shifts for would help, she just didn't want to work that Friday evening.  BTW, I did go to management to see why I was not granted my time off request and was told it was lost (side-note: I later found out this was common practice for them to "lose" time off requests.).  They would not help me find coverage or anything, so I quit.  I could not stay with a company who cut my hours for no reason, and lost an important request like that.  They definitely lost my loyalty with that whole fiasco.

Subsequently I ran into one of the managers from the store who when she found out what happened was on my side.  She thought it was ridiculous and even mentioned that I worked hard for that degree and should be able to attend my graduation.  Luckily less then two weeks later I found a full-time job where I was treated better.

cattlekid

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2014, 05:52:48 PM »
Well, I have one that I am not sure fits here or in the Special Snowflake category, but I'll put it here because it is just one example of how my SIL treats us.

One evening, DH and I were on our way out for dinner and to run errands.  SIL called and demanded that we drop everything, return home, print out an emailed itinerary for FIL's upcoming overseas trip and then drive to MIL/FIL's home and hand the printed itinerary to them. 

Here's what made me go  :o  over that:

1.  SIL had a functional computer and printer.  She said her printer was out of ink and she didn't want to have to go to Wal-Mart to buy more.
2.  FIL's trip was at least two weeks away at the time she called.  There was no need for them to have the itinerary RIGHT THAT MINUTE.
3.  We live 30 minutes away from MIL/FIL.  So we would have had to drive home (x minutes), print out the itinerary (another 5-10 minutes) then drive a hour round trip to deliver the document.
4.  SIL was so incensed when we told her that we wouldn't able to accommodate her request that she called MIL and for all intents and purposes, tattled on us like we were kids on a playground. 

This is but one example of SIL's *do whatever I want you do to for me when I want it because we're FAAAAMMMMIILLLY* attitude that she displays on occasion.   But of course, anything we ask for help with from her/BIL is met with crickets.

Lady Snowdon

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2014, 06:57:14 PM »
At an old job of mine, the company was just starting to get into social media and going a little overboard.  Everybody in the company was being asked to follow the company on Twitter and like the company on Facebook.  We were all encouraged to post great stories from working there, and how much impact we felt we were having in serving the community.  They even set up a blog for the CEO to write little notes about being in Taiwan or Singapore or wherever (never in my location, funnily enough) and feeling such a "connection" to the staff there.  We were all encouraged to comment on that too.  Basically, we were supposed to shill for the company in our free time.

This was the same company that freely acknowledged they didn't pay more experienced people as much as they paid new hires, that cut all HR staff in outlying service areas and concentrated them in the headquarters, so no one who worked anywhere other than headquarters had access to an HR person, and who wouldn't promote someone with customer service experience into any other role within the company.  Yeah, not much loyalty to the company from most of us, which did not help the scheme they'd come up with for social media.  After a month, there were only about 200 likes in Facebook (when there are more than 5,000 people employed by the company!) and we all got nasty emails about needing to support our company.  Because that's how you solve issues, right?  ::)

Thipu1

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2014, 07:07:21 PM »
I have one that fits here. 

Mr. Thipu and I had planned and booked a once in a lifetime opportunity (the final crossing of our honeymoon ship) long in advance.  I applied for the time in December and we were leaving in September. The leave was approved by the Uber-Boss.

Then things started getting odd.  My immediate boss left and a search began for a replacement.  One was found and he was to begin work a week before our voyage.  The Uber-Boss almost demanded that I change my vacation time so I could be in the office to break him in. 

The trip we had planned couldn't be rescheduled and it had been approved before the new boss had even been interviewed.  My answer was a resounding, 'NO'. 

After that, the Uber-Boss never really trusted me to do anything important. 


Eeep!

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2014, 07:13:00 PM »
Not sure if this totally fits but Allli's post made me think  of it. When I was in high school I had an after school job at a yogurt place. After I started I quickly realized that there were several girls working who were buddies with the owner and the rest of us, well, weren't.  At the time I was in drama.  It was tech week and I was scheduled to work, despite asking for the week off. I think it was final dress rehearsal.  I tried to find someone to take my shift but no one would/could. So I called my boss and told her. She pretty much said "oh well" at which point I told her that I was sorry I was going to have to quit. (This was just an after school job to make spending money.) At which point she told me that I needed to find someone to cover my upcoming shift.  ::)  Um, you do remember that that is the whole reason why I am quitting, right? Then she tried to tell me I had to give two weeks notice.  I told her actually I didn't and ended the call. I didn't really miss that job. ;)
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Ceallach

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2014, 07:13:29 PM »
This is kind of a demand for loyalty, although a bit unusual...  more of a demand that "because you work for us you should all care about our vision and plan more than your own money and life".         I worked for a very large corporation.   They decided to put on a big convention one year for all the staff, a bit of a "ra ra ra let's celebrate our success" type thing.  I'm usually a fan of that stuff - free food and booze, yay!    This was  a couple of hours, in the late afternoon one weekday.

First the sales director talked about the big wins they'd had and successes of the year, and then our company president addressed us all.    The company president's speech was basically all about how disappointed he was in the company for having such a low turnout for the recent "voluntary charity donation" scheme they'd put in place.    You see, they had offered us the amazing opportunity to have money deducted from our wages and donated to charity on our behalf, so they could announce publicly how generous and wonderful the staff of X company were.    But a very low percentage of staff had taken them up on the offer.   Funnily enough, we didn't want them taking money out of our hard-earned wages.   I honestly felt like standing up and saying "If you want to donate from your million dollar salary to charity please do so, some of us are just trying to pay our bills on our significantly lower salaries!".   I actually do donate to charity, but didn't like any of the specific charities they had selected and also preferred to donate privately on my own terms, not for the company's gratification and public profile.    I actually quit the next day when my formal job offer came through from my current employer, who I adore.  Best move I ever made.      It still amuses me though that his idea of motivating staff was to lecture us all on our selfish we were not to want to donate more to charity when we were given the amazing opportunity to do so and "be part of something".   
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cicero

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2014, 07:36:02 PM »
My former job ( museum/non profit):

Some of us were asked if we were willing to work on election day ( BG: where I live, parliament election day are a day off, schools are closed, stores are open. In terms of pay it's considered a holiday so we get paid for not going to work). We told my boss that we are willing to come in but we should get extra compensation ( previous places I had worked gave us double time). She said no, that we are being greedy, we will just get paid for the day. We argued that we will be paid for the day anyway so why should we bother coming in? I think they eventually gave us time and a half but it felt really good to have to beg to be paid when they asked us to go the extra mile

Same job: previous HR manager had approved me to go to school for a degree, they would cover certain percentage of tuition plus a certain number of hours per week. I worked out with my boss that i would do overtime to make up the hours. One of the few perks of that job. Then the next HR manager refused to let me go to school, wouldn't reimburse me for that percentage, only a set amount, claimed that whatever previous HR manager agreed was only for one year and a whole lot of other baloney. Tried to claim that there was no reason for !me to go to school at those hours, why cant i go at night? Ummm because they dont give these classes at other times.Luckily for me I had a letter from them stating that they would cover my degree, not just " cover one year" as she was trying to claim. Eventually I left that job.

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hjaye

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2014, 09:40:58 AM »
It seems there is an underlying theme in a lot of these stories, upper management expects loyalty from the bottom up, but you don't see the same loyalty from the top down.

Just about every company I've worked for gives lip service to how important the employees are, the company is the employees, we are all family.................

Now don't get me wrong, I like my job, it's good working conditions, good pay, good benefits, and they are very understanding about family events and emergencies.  I do realize though, they still regard me as an expense.  I am a commodity, a number on a large spreadsheet and if they decide my numbers don't fit in their overall scheme of things they will dump me faster than I can blink.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2014, 10:13:26 AM »
BG: I tend to lurk on Customers Suck and I was reading an interesting thread there. The gist of it was that the OP had noticed that they weren't scheduled for Black Friday and thus chose to make plans for the day. Their boss calls later (a day or two before, IIRC) asking/telling the OP to come in for that day because they realized that they would be understaffed otherwise. And they were shocked and sincerely confused at the refusal to come in. This, apparently, was a company that tended to schedule you for more hours now and cut them later in the week, so the OP wouldn't even be making extra money by going in on the busiest day of the year.

Hehe. I had almost the idential situation, except for the last part. My second PT job is in retail, and if I'm not at my mom's for Thanksgiving, including BF, I'm willing to work. However, I also wasn't scheduled for BF this year, but then oh, a week or so out, they tried to tell me it was a mistake (it wasn't) and they needed me to work. Sorry, no can do. What really happened is I think they were told they needed more staff, and having realized they didn't schedule me, oops, we need you now.

I didn't have any concrete plans, but on principle, and the fact I didn't want to get going doing stuff at home, then have to stop and get ready and go in from 5-close, I said sorry, I have plans. They weren't thrilled with me, but oh well. I'm never under any obligation to go in if I haven't been scheduled. They can ask, but that's about it. And a week before is not the time to tell me or realize you messed up. Sorry, not happening.

With that same job; its kind of give and take regarding loyalty. Since I work FT; I don't work Sundays. I do however, work 2 nights and every Sat. Which I prefer. Every now and then they'll ask if i can work a sunday, and sometimes I do, but more often than not I don't. Yet I work any weeknight; don't ask for a set schedule, same with Sat. I will work day or closing. Doesn't matter to me. 

I will say, I kind of follow the principle of "sometimes you have to say no" even if you can do something, beacuse I've found if I say yes to all of their requests, all the time, they tend to want more and more.

Only me

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2014, 02:16:22 PM »
I had a p/t job in college and the schedule was only put up one week in advance, and had "subject to change at anytime" stamped on it. For a p/t job I ususally ended up working about 35 hrs a week, and was always exhausted. Going to school, going to work and trying to catch up on sleep was all I did in life.

I did like the manager and found her really fair when I needed time off with advance. However the second year I worked there I noticed I was off on a Friday or Sat night (can't remember) but it was Hallowe'en night. One of the other waitress that I got on with, invited me out and we made plans. However I just had a sinking feeling all week, and made sure to check the schedule the night before I was off. By 9am my name was still not showing on the schedule to work, so I just went with that but noticed by 11 (when we closed) that my name was there.

I went home and instructed my mom that if work called, I was out. I went out on  Hallowe'en and had a good time. I went in for my next scheduled shift and got a "why didn't you show up you were scheduled". however they let it drop when I said I checked by 9am the night before and wasn't scheduled. Luckily it turned out ok, what didn't was when they higher summer staff for hte same position I had, paid them a significant amount more than I was making. I asked about it and for a raise and was turned down for some ninny of an excuse. Soon after that I got another job and gave my two weeks notice just before my school ended, and the manager's was upset as she had planned to give me as much overtime as I wanted for the summer.

Yeah no thanks.

workingmum

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2014, 02:26:14 PM »
My last job! I regularly worked 60 hours a week, travelled all over the country to put out fires, and spent long periods away from DD -  but didn't mind so much becuase I was paid extremely well and the company was going places. Then the owner decides that payroll is costing way too much (it was below industry average for that sector), so he's going to cut pays (regardless of the fact that it is illegal!). Mine's first on the chopping block. So in order to keep the peace, I agree but with the understanding that I would cut down the hours I was working. No, that wasn't good enough. I had to keep doing the insane hours at a reduced pay cause who else was going to do the work?

I very politely tell him, what he's doing is illegal, he can either agree to cut my hours as well as pay or I would quit on the spot and bring a case for unfair dismissal. What do you know... he agreed to the reduced woring hours. it was too little too late though - I already had another job lined up and gave him my notice the next week.
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goldilocks

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2014, 03:52:29 PM »
Sort of one in reverse.   

Years ago I was a supervisor.  One of my staff members quit.   No big drama, she never really wanted to work and finally had the chance to stay home.   She was a fair employee.  So she hands in her 2 week notice.

3 days later I have the new job opening posted on the board and am conducing interviews.   She told me this was "disrespectful" of me not to wait until her last day.   

Yarnspinner

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2014, 05:42:01 PM »


One of Stonecold's brilliant money making ideas for the library was that every library employee would sign a pledge to give up at least twenty dollars from their paycheck to go back into the library.  She created a form to have employees fill out and included it with paychecks every week.  Surprisingly, no one wanted to have money taken out of their paychecks.

And of course, that made all of us capital R r*cists.  So she decided to show us what a popular idea and mailed the forms to all the other city employees demanding that they show us what it's like to be a team player.

The non-library employees went to Labor Relations who explained to her that you Can't Make People Give Back Their Salaries Unless You Are The Mayor. 

Instead of learning from this, she has since developed an adversarial relationship with the mayor in which she routinely ignores hiring practice rules, refuses to get approval for her expenditures, and hires people off the street....then, when caught out,  has to tell the people she has hired "oh, I'm sorry, but the mean old people at Labor Relations are r*cist and just refuse to play ball with me and I have to let you go."

It's especially amusing because the people who run Labor Relations are all, well, the same race as Stonecold. 

I keep wondering what she would do if she actually met up with an honest to goodness real-io, true-lio bigot (like my Uncle Nasty) who actually denied her things because of her race and not because her idea was just plain over the top dumb.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2014, 05:46:59 PM »
I really hate when people use that when they're trying to get their own way. It's not that I'm r*cist, it's that you're a horrible person and they exist everywhere.

I had someone in an Internet message board accuse me of that. How was I supposed to know he was blue, orange or purple coloured?