Author Topic: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)  (Read 57705 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2014, 05:54:05 PM »
Yarnspinner, that reminds me: I have always wondered whether people who work at United Way are encouraged to donate to themselves  ::)

(I broke up a group of teens who were shouting across the table at each other once.  One of the boys told me I was racist because "black people don't like to be segregated."  I'm proud to say that I - despite being the only white person in the room and a northerner besides - was able to provide a good off-the-cuff ten-minute lecture on how they were disrespecting all those people who fought for civil rights - including their own grandparents, several of whom I know for a fact were involved in local protests and were the reason there's now a "no lying down in the street unless you're ill" law on the books - and just what segregation really entailed.  They didn't try to pull that one again, but that goes down as one of the more  ::) ::) ::)-worthy comments I remember getting . . .)

alkira6

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2014, 06:00:46 PM »
Oooooh, yes, yes, yes!

Working for a school district putting in 12 hour days and coming in on Saturdays (mostly unpaid) to work with at risk kids and help push for AYP.  When I got sick and had to use my accrued sick leave I was chastised in a letter from the assistant superintendent for my "egregious" abuse of sick leave.  I still had about a month of sick days banked at that point.  Better believe that I had no problem taking my days when needed after that.

nuit93

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2014, 06:02:31 PM »
I had a boss (small company) refer to my minimum wage pay as my "salary" and complain about how hard it was to make payroll in the hopes that we'd somehow agree to less than minimum.

Nope, sorry.  I'm not that loyal to anyone.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2014, 06:09:22 PM »
This story from Not Always Working.

I really don't get pay cuts to reduce costs, as I think one of he most important assets a business have is it's employees. You keep them happy, they work harder. Most of the time.

hermanne

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2014, 06:23:38 PM »
^^

I like that one. Way to shoot yourself in the foot, boss!
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Thipu1

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2014, 07:26:18 PM »
My Immediate Boss (IB) was a dyed in the wool 'Union Maid'. She was the treasurer for the local and a surrogate secretary because the actual secretary didn't have a typewriter or word processor in her office. 

When IB left for a new job it was expected that I would take over her union duties.

Erm, NO.

Although I'm fine with my own finances I didn't want the responsibility or extra work of dealing with union money.  I also had no training in the accounting methods they used. 

I'd typed a few documents for the union rep but it was impossible.  The man was a functional illiterate who couldn't write his way out of a paper bag. Just editing it enough to understand what he wanted to say was a chore.

  It might have been all right when IB had me to do other work while she did union stuff but, since I was now the only one in the office, it couldn't be done.

The rep was hurt that I wasn't loyal to the union.

Tough.   


aiki

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2014, 08:06:11 PM »
Re: Stonecold

I keep wondering what she would do if she actually met up with an honest to goodness real-io, true-lio bigot (like my Uncle Nasty) who actually denied her things because of her race and not because her idea was just plain over the top dumb.

She'd probably see no difference - after all, this person who is not doing as they should is just another hater who doesn't recognize the true greatness of Stonecold's current grand plan.
"A true gentleman is one who is never unintentionally rude."  - Oscar Wilde

baglady

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2014, 08:40:34 PM »
When I was a senior in college, I was working full time and going to school full time. My work schedule was afternoons Monday-Friday, and mornings on Saturday. I lost some sleep, but it was worth it, as the job was in my chosen field. My boss (who was also in her 20s) was kind of a hard-bottom, and we had some conflicts, but I chalk that up to differing expectations on both our parts.

But the one incident I've never quite forgiven her for, 30-plus years later, was her reaction to my father's death. My mother called on a Monday to tell me he had passed. Of course I promised to come home the next day. I called my boss and told her what had happened. She told me I could have the day of the funeral, the day before and the day after off.

I arrived home Tuesday to discover that the funeral was on Saturday with calling hours on Thursday and Friday (fairly standard Catholic tradition in that time and place), according to the arrangements my mother and older siblings had made -- without me, but that's another story. I called my boss to tell her I couldn't be back until Monday. Her response, in a very snotty tone: "Well, I hope you realize what this is doing to my schedule!"

Plus, I got a ration from mom and siblings for my mildly panicked reaction to learning the arrangements and realizing I would have to take more time off than I'd been authorized for. How selfish of me!

A couple of years later, the founder/CEO of the small company I was working for actually declared, "An ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness." (Translation: Take that, you people who don't like the way I do things but think I won't replace you because your job skills are too valuable!). This prompted a co-worker to quip that she was thinking about naming her dog (Company Name), because "he's not clever, but he's loyal!"
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green.and.blue

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2014, 10:17:17 PM »
When I was in college, I had a part time job through my first year, managing at a inbound call centre. Many college students worked there, and they were generally clamouring for extra hours in the summer. I managed to land a full-time paid internship at a non-profit for the summer, but planned to keep my two-nights a week at the call centre so i could keep working there through the next school year.

We handed our availability in, then our schedules were set for the next two weeks. Turned out all the other managers (who were not students) had booked their vacation times for the summer, and the upper management had assumed without asking me that I would want to work full time in the summer since I was a student, so I could cover the vacations without them needing to hire or train additional management staff.

When the schedule came out for the first two weeks of summer with me working every night until 1 or 2 am, I went to my boss and said I couldn't do it. He showed me where I'd marked off "any day/time" on my availability sheet -which I did because I was flexible about which two days I worked, and I had done it the whole time I worked there. He wouldn't change it.

I did work full time hours at both jobs for four weeks while they trained a new manager - but boss's boss didn't end up liking the person they promoted, so they scheduled me for a third set of full time, actually six days each week, with a double shift on one Saturday. I quit.

Vall

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2014, 10:23:15 PM »
This story from Not Always Working.

I really don't get pay cuts to reduce costs, as I think one of he most important assets a business have is it's employees. You keep them happy, they work harder. Most of the time.
Oh no.  Another website that I will waste even more hours of my free time.
 ;D Thanks!

AmethystAnne

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2014, 10:55:30 PM »
Off topic:

^
Ooooo, wait 'till you get there, there are links to 5(?) similar sites, but different topics.  >:D


.....back on topic........

Minmom3

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2014, 12:45:49 AM »
Maria - I'd quibble with that.  Not sure how to word what I mean - but minimum effort, I think, isn't a good way to go about any job.  A good solid effort but within parameters set by the job.  Minimum effort says to me that I'm nearly skating in my work ethic.  Whereas, what I feel should happen is that within those limits, you do your best.  Most minimum wage jobs are by their nature fairly restricted.

My first job was Kentucky Fried Chicken.  I learned the names of the pieces KFC sold, I learned how to run a cash register, I learned how to be polite under duress to people who were sometimes trying to get me to break or crack (we were across the street from UCLA in Los Angeles, and we got pranked fairly regularly, as well as the mandatory drunk/high-as-a-kite folk), I learned to have a good work ethic.  It was a good first job - I had to work hard or lose the job, it fed me 6 days a week, and allowed me to buy my clothes, since my mother had quit doing so.  I learned to hugely resent people who gave it a minimum effort, as it meant that I'd be pulling their weight as well as my own. 

Putting out a maximum effort didn't mean I tried to do the cooks job, or the managers job - it means I did my best at my job, all the time.  They treated me fairly, and I treated them fairly by working hard.  Not because I wanted to stay in food service the rest of my life, but because I felt and still feel that I should work hard or get another job elsewhere.
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Library Dragon

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2014, 12:53:39 AM »
I tend to think that any company paying me minimum wage and expecting more than minimum effort is demanding of me more loyalty than they deserve. Minimum wage equals minimum effort.

I'll have to disagree. When I look to give raises or move someone from PT to FT it isn't going to be for minimum effort.

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Twik

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2014, 10:20:51 AM »
Not an egregious one, but I remember once the owner of the company coming through with visitors, and saying, "And everyone works here for the love of the company!"

It was all I could do not to say, "Well, it sure ain't for the money, Boss!"
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Virg

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2014, 12:53:45 PM »
When I was in high school, I worked a minimum wage counter job at a pharmacy.  Through good fortune I got the chance to go with my German class on a two week trip to several European countries (German-speaking, of course).  When I told the pharmacist about the trip and asked for those two weeks off, he told me that he saw no reason to give me the time off (despite full staffing on the schedule) because my job was much more important than some "dumb vacation" and I needed to grow up and shoulder my responsibilities like a man (remember, I was a teenager working fifteen hours a week for pocket money while attending high school).  I didn't have to quit because they fired me when I told them I still planned on going.  The kicker is that the manager called me well after that and told me that they'd be willing to let me have my job back as long as I'd "learned my lesson".  I declined.

Virg