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Author Topic: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)  (Read 115374 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #150 on: February 23, 2014, 11:34:27 AM »
So - after you finished your degree - would they have had you go full time at the reduced rate that they'd gotten away with paying a college student or would you have gotten paid what Jane was being paid?

Think about it.  What do YOU think they would have done?  Still feel like you did the wrong thing walking away from training Jane?
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

bopper

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #151 on: February 24, 2014, 09:15:18 AM »
This is why I am so glad to be in civil service, where salary is set by law and is a matter of public record.

And the school district! Even our retirement is published.

I actually found that to be kind of cool...you could see when your favorite teachers retired or if they are still working at the school. I don't really care what their retirement pay is.

drzim

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #152 on: February 25, 2014, 03:55:01 PM »
Slightly OT.....a story about comparing salaries that happened a long long time ago...

When I was home for the summer after my first year of college I landed a very nice summer job working for a company that did evaluations of educational curricula and special programs for K-12 schools.  At first all I was doing was data entry, but I learned quickly and started doing more and more analysis of the data, graphs, compiling reports.  Because they liked me so much, they invited me back to work there during all my breaks, winter and summer, for the next 3 years. I was making a decent salary, much more than a typical student job, such that I didn't have to work part-time during the semester. I think that's why I kept going back.  Summer after my junior year, I had taken advanced statistics and math so they had me doing even more technical work and analysis.  Halfway through that summer, the project I had been working was really turning into their main project, and they realized that I would be gone soon so they decided to hire a full time employee to take over. 

The new hire, Jane, had just graduated with her B.A. degree in the education field. It became apparent that my new role was to train Jane, which I did.  Basically, she was doing my exact job and not that well, I may add.  I was constantly having to go back over things and fix her mistakes. Her response was always "oh that's just a little error, it doesn't really matter"  and "why do you have to be so picky about details?"  Frustrating, but I always made sure everything was eventually corrected. 

One day, though, after a particularly annoying session with her and her mistakes, she blurted out that she wasn't all that interested in this job, it was too much attention to detail, too much computer work, and they were *only* paying her $X........of course, I was stunned because it was almost twice as much as they were paying me....and we were doing the exact same job.  Actually I was doing a large chunk of hers as well as mine.

When I asked my direct boss about it ( I had never even been given a raise in all the time I worked there), she laughed at me like I was the most naive girl on the planet.  "Of course she is paid more than you.  Jane has a DEGREE.  That's the way the real working world works."

I finished that week but never went back.  I always thought I was kind of SS because I expected to get paid the same as the person that I was training.   Is it common to pay people with a degree more for the same job? 

In my experience, yes it is fairly common to pay an intern less money than a full time employee with a degree.  And while your exact job title may not have been intern, it's probably the closest to what you were doing.   You were not a full time employee, nor were you a traditional part time employee.  You were there for ~3 months in the summer and then ~4-6 weeks in the winter?  Who was doing what you were doing the rest of the year?  Were you the only person doing this type of job?

However, I agree that they were using you and your skills unfairly.  I would never give an employee such as yourself that type of project without having a pretty serious discussion about expectations, both salary and job wise.

To answer a few questions, I think it was closer to a temp position....I only worked there ~4 months/year, but when I was working it was full time. So by the time I left, I had put in the equivalent of almost 1 year full time.  The project I worked on was a long term study--so the first year it was mostly just data entry and simple stuff because it had just started.  But as time passed and more data was accumulated, it needed to be analyzed.  I am not 100% sure, but I don't think they had anyone doing the analysis when I wasn't there, just data entry.  Then when I returned, I would work on the analysis and reports.  It was only during that third summer when they decided that there had been enough progress with the project that they needed someone working on it all throughout the year, and that's when they hired Jane.

Yes, I was young and didn't realize that they were taking advantage of me. I was just excited to directly use what I had learned in my college math and statistics classes.  I was blindsided by the fact that Jane was being paid much much more than me for the same basic work (and add to the fact that I was training her).  They could have offered me a little more pay and I would've been happy.   Instead,  my supervisor actually laughed at me--laughed at the thought that I deserved to make as much money as someone with a degree--even though I was only 2 semesters away from a degree myself.

I have no idea if they would have paid me the bigger salary after I graduated.  My college degree was in science (Genetics) and I was hoping to land a job in a research lab, so I wouldn't have considered working there.  It just happened that many of the math/statistics programs used for an educational study were the same as ones used for a genetics study.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #153 on: February 25, 2014, 09:14:07 PM »
Your supervisor was....not very smart.  I would kill for a student like you.  In fact, I try really really hard not to give up staff like you at all.  I have one kid who's been working with me since he was a sophomore in high school.  He's a junior in college now.  I'm very happy that he decided to go to a local school.  Although now I'm considering letting him be poached by a local hospital lab, he's that good.

Winterlight

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #154 on: February 26, 2014, 08:24:41 AM »
I think your supervisor could at the least have gently explained things to you instead of laughing. That was mean and not good management.
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To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #155 on: February 26, 2014, 11:50:53 PM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree.

NyaChan

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #156 on: February 27, 2014, 12:02:23 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.

nuit93

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #157 on: February 27, 2014, 12:27:01 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree.

And there goes my keyboard ;)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #158 on: February 27, 2014, 12:48:04 AM »
Okay, that's the best fail I've ever had. I blame autocorrect and a bus ride.

amandaelizabeth

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #159 on: February 27, 2014, 12:51:18 AM »
Only an Aussie!!!!

cicero

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #160 on: February 27, 2014, 01:53:48 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.
hear hear!

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greencat

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #161 on: February 27, 2014, 01:56:55 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.
hear hear!

It's not true!  An education is very important to potential suitors  ;)

alkira6

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #162 on: February 27, 2014, 10:42:13 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.
hear hear!

It's not true!  An education is very important to potential suitors  ;)

Worked for me  >:D

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #163 on: February 27, 2014, 11:29:40 AM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.


I'd suggest that it is true that people with degrees have more luck. If you have more degrees than someone else, then you are going to be attractive to people who are looking for someone really hot.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 11:31:15 AM by nutraxfornerves »

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #164 on: February 27, 2014, 12:04:57 PM »
I wonder if you supervisor knows that in some areas a degree is less values because a lot of people have one and they got from work experience instead.

People just don't get laid more just because they have a degree
.

Well after spending many years in school getting my degrees, I have to say that's disappointing to hear.


I'd suggest that it is true that people with degrees have more luck. If you have more degrees than someone else, then you are going to be attractive to people who are looking for someone really hot.

More directly, income is a pretty major contributor to sexual attraction - for women.  From an academic study about online dating:

65% of men and 53% of women report their income. Income strongly affects the
success of men, as measured by the number of first-contact e-mails received (Figure 5.6).
While there is no apparent effect below an annual income of $50,000, outcomes improve
monotonically for income levels above $50,000. Relative to incomes below $50,000, the
increase in the expected number of first contacts is at least 34% and as large as 151% for
incomes in excess of $250,000. In contrast to the strong income effect for men, the online
success of women is at most marginally related to their income. Women in the $50,000-
$100,000 income range fare slightly better than women with lower incomes. Higher incomes,
however, do not appear to improve outcomes, and—with the exception of incomes between
$150,000 and $200,000—are not associated with a statistically different effect relative to the
$15,000-$25,000 income range.

The same study found in regards to education, though, that "For men, higher levels of education are associated with a modest increase in first contacts [through the online dating service]; for women, the relationship is essentially flat."  Their study also found that women were much more likely to seek out men with the same education level they had; men didn't seem to care as much.  Here's what I found the most interesting, though:

Quote
Table 5.5 shows the trade-offs between height and income. A man who is 5 feet 6
inches tall, for example, needs an additional $175,000 to be as desirable as a man who is
approximately 6 feet tall (the median height in our sample) and who makes $62,500 per
year.

Maybe the most striking numbers are with regard to income-ethnicity trade-offs, as
shown in Table 5.6. For equal success with a white woman, an African-American man needs
to earn $154,000 more than a white man. Hispanic men need an additional $77,000, and
Asian men need an additional $247,000 in annual income. In contrast to men, women mostly
cannot compensate for their ethnicity with a higher income.

It's a really fascinating paper (especially if you skip all the math)  :P


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