Author Topic: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)  (Read 59056 times)

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Yarnspinner

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2014, 01:54:20 AM »
But it did tell her how "highly" her education, skills, and experience were valued (not) - which probably had more to do with her quitting...

Thank you Vorfemme.   While I understand the OP may have sounded spiteful towards the other employees, I also understand what it is to have your years of experience in a field undervalued and your education denigrated.  My professional coworkers and I have been told that:

1) trained monkeys could do our jobs
2) that we are nothing but overpaid stock clerks

And over the last six months, Stonecold gave out three " junior promotions" to support staff who claim they are getting their masters' in library science.  Not one of these young women have gotten a BA yet and all of them are making as much or more than their predecessors were.  The three of them act as Stonecold's "assistant directors".   None of them know what they are doing, are way in over their heads and are making huge mistakes that are costing us $$$$$.  They refuse (as per Stonecold) to seek advice from senior staff who know what they are doing.

Consequently, senior staff has backed off and let them sink.  Of course, it's Stonecold, so she is turning a blind eye to the mess they are making.  Still, all three are in for a rude awakening as Stonecold repeatedly tells the Board that she has no intention of giving them "full" promotions and will continue to use them to do her dirty work.  And the senior staff knows that if the girls make big enough mistakes, it will be their heads on the chopping blocks....not Stonecold's. 

Unfortunately, we can't work up a lot of sympathy given the way the three of them have treated coworkers who helped them out when they first started.  It may seem ugly of us, but the truth is, they brought this on themselves.

Pierrotlunaire0 gave no indication that the new employees had treated her badly. I'm sorry that the junior staff at your job have treated you badly. As I recall, it's been several years since Stonecold was hired and started giving you problems at work. It's surprising, after everything you've told us, that she is still employed. Is it possible that her ideas are actually working and that the senior staff who are so opposed to her methods are more likely just opposed to change?



You are right; Pierre's situation was different from mine in that respect.  As for the rest of it, I cannot come up with a cogent and respectful response.  Anything I could say in response to the last part of that paragraph would get the thread closed and me banned.  So let's just go back to the loyalty stories.   


Modified again because I left part of one of my earlier efforts to respond in here.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 01:58:45 AM by Yarnspinner »

VorFemme

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2014, 09:23:42 AM »
From how long Yarnspinner has been posting about Stonecold - we can only conclude that she has photos of important people in compromising positions and they have been hidden in very safe places where there is no way for anyone to get to them & destroy them without Stonecold cooperating.

Either that or she's the reincarnation of P. T. Barnum & nobody wants to admit that they followed the signs to see the exhibit of the egress, not realizing that that was the "exit"...

Because she has held onto that position for a while - while pulling stunts that would get MOST people recognized as having more issues than National Geographic (well, she might have culled all the earlier National Geographics from the library archives when she had a bunch of "old stuff" thrown out) - so there may only be five or six issues on hand.....(the previous is intended as a joke - since I don't know of many magazines with more archived issues than the National Geographic).
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Unwarranted Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2014, 10:34:26 AM »
At the worst of the recession, the large corporation I worked for cut salaries by 15% to avoid layoffs.  Employees accepted this decision.  Within a year, there was a massive layoff, and it was brutal. About 10% of employees were let go, regardless of experience, accomplishments, or business needs.  The company paid a large sum to a consultant group to select the doomed employees, and the primary consideration was that the selection was random enough that no group (race, age, gender, etc) could sue for discrimination.

One person in my already understaffed group was dismissed.  This was traumatic for everyone, and let us all know that no amount of hard work could save us from the company's whims. The laid-off person was rehired two years later, at a starting position/salary. 

Employee morale has vanished.  The company is now doing what it can to get well-paid employees to leave voluntarily.  Jobs are being outsourced.  Experienced employees are expected to train and help the inexperienced newcomers.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2014, 10:52:52 AM »
I was working for a government agency involved in environmental protection. As happens with such agencies, there was an election and the newly elected executive replaced the agency head & a few top managers with new political appointees. Everyone else was civil service and kept their jobs. The new appointees were, shall we say, idea people rather than good managers.

One of my favorite stories was hearing that the civil service staff who worked directly for New Agency Head were told they could leave early on Christmas Eve--at 5 PM. Agency Head never did figure out why, if he was willing to work 10 hours every day, the rest of his staff weren't loyal enough to the program to also want to do so. These staff were salaried, not hourly, so could not get overtime.

However, the best was a bright idea that fortunately did not go anywhere. One of the top managers had a great suggestion--they would create an environmental "loyalty oath" for all employees to sign. It would contain things like "I promise to recycle" and "I promise to use 'green' appliances." There would even be a pledge to participate in agency-sponsored environmental activities. What a great example to set for the community at large! Great publicity! Everyone will love it!

Well, the personnel experts did not love it, explaining how civil service law did not allow you to dictate employee's personal lives. The lawyers did not love it, explaining that the employee unions would have a field say with grievances and possible lawsuits. The media relations staff also did not love it, explaining that, no, it would not be great publicity, and the media would greet it with scorn at best.

The idea was scrapped, but not before word leaked out to staff, who just laughed.

Nutrax
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Black Delphinium

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #49 on: February 08, 2014, 11:06:39 AM »
I actually had a nightmare about losing my job last night.

Less than a month after being told that job security was "not an issue" management is telling us that they are going to seriously be cracking down on employees who don't meet Corporate's "minimum of 1 credit card application per shift" goal.

I am trying to be cool about it, but part of me is a seething ball of resentment over it.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

Jocelyn

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2014, 12:47:06 PM »
  I could see doing this for the folks involved in patient care like nurses, CNA's and such but if our department is so "useless" than why did we have to risk our necks to get there?  ::)
Not to defend any employer's labeling a group of workers as 'useless'...but you would be very useful in comforting frightened residents. I worked at a nursing home, and shortly after I left work there was a tornado. I went back after the tornado, because I knew there would be lots of things to do, from moving residents back upstairs, giving them dinner and helping them get ready for bedtime- by the time the 'all clear' was sounded, dinner was already an hour late. I still feel badly about how we concentrated on the physical needs and there wasn't anyone who could sit and talk with the residents.

doodlemor

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #51 on: February 08, 2014, 01:15:02 PM »
From how long Yarnspinner has been posting about Stonecold - we can only conclude that she has photos of important people in compromising positions and they have been hidden in very safe places where there is no way for anyone to get to them & destroy them without Stonecold cooperating.

That idea is not entirely outlandish.  We had several employees where I worked who just plain goofed off and didn't do their jobs properly.  Their behavior was entitled, and the person in charge - big boss - let them get away with it.  Some of the bad practices were even safety issues.

One day the big boss, was arrested for soliciting an undercover cop in a public place.  Unfortunately for him, he was also in a company vehicle at the time.  The cops had iron clad evidence, and big boss lost his job.  The shirkers worked a little better for the new guy, and then retired. 

I'm sure that the shirkers had information on the big boss - it's the only explanation that makes sense.  The behavior of the shirkers was incredibly egregious.  The big boss followed normal procedures with the rest of us, and the place fortunately ran smoothly except for the shirkers. 

CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #52 on: February 08, 2014, 02:04:51 PM »
My company seems to have a policy of making the working environment as unpleasant as they can get away with.  It truly seems that they are consciously demonstrating how little the employees are valued.

One time it was decided that cubicle size would be halved.  A lot of money was spent to replace cubicles with smaller ones.  Employees were forced to sign a form stating that we understood the reason for this.

The extra cubicles were still vacant when my group moved eight years later.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #53 on: February 09, 2014, 04:00:17 PM »
  I could see doing this for the folks involved in patient care like nurses, CNA's and such but if our department is so "useless" than why did we have to risk our necks to get there?  ::)
Not to defend any employer's labeling a group of workers as 'useless'...but you would be very useful in comforting frightened residents. I worked at a nursing home, and shortly after I left work there was a tornado. I went back after the tornado, because I knew there would be lots of things to do, from moving residents back upstairs, giving them dinner and helping them get ready for bedtime- by the time the 'all clear' was sounded, dinner was already an hour late. I still feel badly about how we concentrated on the physical needs and there wasn't anyone who could sit and talk with the residents.

Well thing is, I liked the residents and had a really good rapport with most of them, especially the regulars that came down to most events.  I did enjoy the interaction a lot as I've always enjoyed talking to senior citizens.   It was the attitude of the management I didn't particularly care for.  The cognitive and lucid residents didn't care much for them, either, nor did their families.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

MOM21SON

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #54 on: February 09, 2014, 04:49:49 PM »
I actually had a nightmare about losing my job last night.

Less than a month after being told that job security was "not an issue" management is telling us that they are going to seriously be cracking down on employees who don't meet Corporate's "minimum of 1 credit card application per shift" goal.

I am trying to be cool about it, but part of me is a seething ball of resentment over it.

I have recently stopped going to a retail store here because of this policy.  I think its terrible that they expect employees to harass people to apply for their store credit card.

nuit93

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #55 on: February 09, 2014, 11:06:55 PM »
I actually had a nightmare about losing my job last night.

Less than a month after being told that job security was "not an issue" management is telling us that they are going to seriously be cracking down on employees who don't meet Corporate's "minimum of 1 credit card application per shift" goal.

I am trying to be cool about it, but part of me is a seething ball of resentment over it.

Reminds me of my time working in a department store.  They only enforced that rule if you'd been there long enough to make the maximum pay--those folks were always the first to go so they could replace them with minimum wage new hires.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #56 on: February 09, 2014, 11:14:52 PM »
A fbook friend works at Target and was surprised (or so it seemed) that they were backing off pushing the cashiers to push the cards following the big problem they had recently. 

I wasn't all that surprised honestly and thought it was smart of them to back off considering I can't imagine many folks would be clamoring to sign up for their debit or credit card shortly after that all hit the news and I'd be disappointed if they did penalize clerks for not being able to get a sign up/day under the circumstances.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

pierrotlunaire0

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #57 on: February 10, 2014, 08:59:00 AM »
Years ago, I worked in the mental health field.  There was a bit of a shake up (rumor was that the hospital was about to lose a major contract, and my program would be the first to go).  All of us are looking for jobs before the axe fell, and a new supervisor was hired to turn the program around.  Now I like the new boss, Hugh, a lot.  He was trying to make severe programmatic changes, all designed to make the clients' experiences more therapeutic, but I left anyway.

After I left, Hugh contacted me and asked if I was still willing to work 2 nights a week and on Saturdays, running recreational activities.  I did this about 6 weeks, until I happened to run into one of my former coworkers.  It seemed that the old staff was completely gone, and we had all been replaced.  My problem was that all the new staff had at the most Community College degrees (old staff had a minimum of BA, if not Master's degrees), but Hugh had fought hard for the new staff to get good salaries.  So, someone (with a lot less education and experience than I had) had a starting salary greater than my final salary, and I was putting in 12 extra hours a week over my new job to "help" them run the program.

I quit that day.  Let the new people put in the long hours (salaried, not hourly), and when the contract was lost, I didn't shed a tear as they all lost their jobs.

That is a really spiteful thing to think about a group of people who had nothing to do with what you were hired for and paid.

I agree and it's not there fault that  their manager fought for them to be better paid.  Salary can very a lot depending on when you  were hired

I was also never informed that the others were making a lot more money than I was.  Like I said, 12 hours a week on top of my 40 hour a week job is a lot of work.  I thought it was great that Hugh had managed to get them better salaries, but I thought that since I was really doing him a huge favor, he should have given me some consideration.  Also, in the hospital structure, it was supposed to be tied to your education and experience.  Plus, I am not angry at the workers, I was and am angry at the hospital.  If there were standards for certain wages, then how come Hugh was able to work around it?  I also blamed Hugh's predecessor in that he obviously was not willing to fight for us.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 09:20:49 AM by pierrotlunaire0 »
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artk2002

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #58 on: February 10, 2014, 01:04:36 PM »
Not me, but a colleague.

Some background: There is a very Bad Boss in my small company. He's hired incompetent people (the latest was fired last week after a year of "performance plans" -- hired over the objections of the rest of the staff, BTW.) He's micro-managed some projects while ignoring essential things (we lost a week of work because he hadn't renewed some software licenses -- licenses that we knew a year ago would expire.) People have quit over his mistreatment of them. He's a peer to me and I've had to clean up a number of his messes (c.f. software licenses.)

Further background: Anybody who has worked as a systems administrator knows what a thankless job it is. If things are going well, nobody knows that you exist. If things go wrong, then you are the wost person in the world. In a small company, it's even worse. We had one SA who worked 6- and 7-day weeks and was on call the rest of the time, making it a 24x7 job. Said Bad Boss hired a consultant to "help", but all of a sudden all information for the system admin was being filtered through the consultant. The SA knew that his days were numbered (he'd butted heads with Bad Boss a few times earlier over the micro-management.)

On Christmas Eve, the SA asked for the afternoon off. Bad Boss denied it because he insisted that the SA get some systems up and running for an off-shore development team (one that doesn't take time off at Christmas.) There was no need for the rush (partly caused by Bad Boss' incompetence in any case) because the off-shore team had plenty of other things that they could do to keep busy.  This was purely Bad Boss' ego in play. So the system admin quit on the spot, leaving us far worse off than losing an afternoon's work would have.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Unwarrented Demands for Loyalty (Share stories)
« Reply #59 on: February 10, 2014, 01:19:09 PM »
I technically graduated from high school in the fall, but walked with the rest of my class in May. During the in between time I'd taken a little second job at a tiny coffee shop right between my school and my home, it was a few nights a week, I mostly did it for free coffee and tip money.

The owner of the coffee shop employed a good amount of graduating seniors, all from the same high school, and when graduation night started coming up we all were asking for the day off. About two weeks before I'd had my ceremony for my AA degree and my boss had happily given me the night off and wished me well (even gave me a congrats card!), so I assumed it'd be no issue for my HS graduation. So when the new schedule came out I was surprised to see I was working grad night. On my break I went and talked to her and explained I would not be working that night, I was going to my graduation. She told me "You already graduated, this is just a ceremony", I said yes, but it was an important ceremony and I was going to which she responded "Well, you're a grown up now, and your work comes first. Everyone else wants the night off, so you gotta work it. You need to show your loyalty to me and to this company". I walked away from her, grabbed my bag and went to the bathroom to change out of my uniform shirt. Which I handed back to her and said "I quit, my loyalty  is to my family who have waited 13 years to watch me walk across that stage" and walked out. They went out of business a few months later so guess no one was all that loyal.