Author Topic: No dinner?  (Read 10342 times)

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jaxsue

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2014, 11:17:23 AM »
Some little kids do eat early. But I know more than one family with small children where the parents and the kids don't get home until 5:30 or 6 pm--a parent has to drive from work to pick the kids up from day care, then drive home. In many areas, that's going to take at least half an hour. Even if they start getting dinner right away, most nights, they are not eating until 6 or 6:30.

I'd have been okay with the timing if a mention of the food available had been on the invitation. Something like "cake and cookies and fun in the bouncy house!" But otherwise, more substantial food should have been provided.

As a PP pointed out, the party started at 6. Add in travel time, traffic at that hour, etc., and people had to leave home around 5:30.

Per the bolded: IME that's the norm. I know few people who can be home from work by 5 pm (usually military base/gov't personnel), and if there's any prep/travel time to consider, 6 pm is a bit tight.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2014, 11:23:59 AM »
I would have expected dinner, too, even if it's just pizza.  I would also have made excuses and leave early to feed my kid dinner. 

peaches

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2014, 11:33:02 AM »
I find that time frame (6 - 8 p.m.) very late for the invited age group. It looks like the hosts didn't want to serve dinner, so they pushed the time later. But that's late for 3-4 year olds to be out socializing.

I can imagine that working parents would have trouble getting to a party before 6 p.m. But that argues for a weekend party rather than a weeknight one.

I think if I got an invitation that was borderline as to whether it covered the dinner hour or not, I'd phone in my rsvp, and ask if I should feed my child dinner before the party.

But maybe not. In my experience, it's customary to serve substantial food at any birthday party, with the possible exception of an early afternoon one.

123sandy

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2014, 11:45:01 AM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2014, 11:50:54 AM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

 :o  In what planet is this OK?  Did the parents not feed their own kids, too? 

ladyknight1

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2014, 11:55:18 AM »
I don't want to infer anything to the sleepover story, but my family was a foster family for several years. In many of the cases, the children got to go visit other relatives. They always came back hungry. It was heartbreaking.

sweetonsno

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2014, 11:58:19 AM »
I also am more surprised that the party went that late than by the lack of meal. Most people I know who have kids around that age put them to bed by seven. (They normally eat at 5 or so.) That said, I would probably expect a bit more food than just crackers and cupcakes.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2014, 12:02:02 PM »
I don't want to infer anything to the sleepover story, but my family was a foster family for several years. In many of the cases, the children got to go visit other relatives. They always came back hungry. It was heartbreaking.

I didn't even think about that possibility.  If that was the case, that is really sad.  Perhaps 123Sandy can clarify.

Eeep!

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2014, 12:08:22 PM »
For a party at that time (which I agree is bizarre for that age group. My ODS, now 4, is still in bed by 8.) I would have expected food.  Add in that it was at one of those type places I would have extra thought there was food because I would have assumed that their party packages always include that.  Now I know that assumption isn't always correct, which really surprises me. I would have thought that those type places would always do that for the money.

And I agree that even if kids normally eat a bit earlier - mine don't because of work timing which we just carry over to the weekends - if you figure in getting ready and travel time (and kids taking forever to eat) the kids would have likely had to eat dinner around 4:30, which is quite early.
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123sandy

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #39 on: February 10, 2014, 12:17:26 PM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

 :o  In what planet is this OK?  Did the parents not feed their own kids, too?

The father cooked breakfast for himself and the younger children but my son and his friend got nothing!

artk2002

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #40 on: February 10, 2014, 02:59:47 PM »
I agree that the timing is really off for kids that young and that a meal should have been provided.
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TootsNYC

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #41 on: February 10, 2014, 03:51:02 PM »
If the party had been even 6:30, I might have enquired, "Should I feed her before she goes?"


We had a youth-group-type instruction thing organized for the kids of several churches. It started at 6. I sent my kid to the first one, and she came home shaking, she was so hungry--there hadn't been *anything* to eat, not even snacks!

And considering that the kids would have had to leave home at 5:30 at the -latest- (sometimes more like 5:10), I hadn't expected to make her eat supper. Heck, it was a Sunday night, and most churches in our area have service at 11, so it's over about 12:15, which means most people would eat lunch at 1pm, so sort of late. An early supper is not that common.

When it was our church's turn to host, by gum we had sandwiches. And one of the moms from the other church made a point of spreading around that we expected there to be some sort of food.

Twik

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #42 on: February 11, 2014, 11:48:15 AM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

 :o  In what planet is this OK?  Did the parents not feed their own kids, too?

The father cooked breakfast for himself and the younger children but my son and his friend got nothing!

That's really the definition of bad hosting, isn't it?
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GrammarNerd

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #43 on: February 11, 2014, 12:39:30 PM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

 :o  In what planet is this OK?  Did the parents not feed their own kids, too?

The father cooked breakfast for himself and the younger children but my son and his friend got nothing!

I'm just baffled....what possible reason did they give your child for not offering him any food? 

Didn't the friend want to eat?  I know you're not supposed to ask for stuff in a guest's house, but when you've been invited for a sleepover, and breakfast isn't forthcoming and others in the household are, in fact, eating in front of you, I think it would have been perfectly acceptable for your son to ask if he could have something to eat.  Poor kid probably didn't know what to do though.  It's one of those parenting things you never even think to teach your child....how to handle it when you've been invited to someone's house for a while and they don't offer you anything to eat. 

Made me think of the time when my son came home from his friend's house (has slept over there many times) and said he was so hungry.  I asked why b/c the host kid is always hungry and is making food.  Son said they had a pizza (3 boys total) the night before and he and the other guest each had one piece and the host kid took the rest of the pizza for himself.  :o  Apparently no breakfast either that time.

darling

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Re: No dinner?
« Reply #44 on: February 11, 2014, 12:53:03 PM »
My youngest went on a sleepover a couple of years ago. He was about 10 at the time. He left our house at 5 pm on Friday and came home at 3pm on Saturday. The sum total of food he got at his friends house? A bag of crisps! He never got to go over there again!

 :o  In what planet is this OK?  Did the parents not feed their own kids, too?

The father cooked breakfast for himself and the younger children but my son and his friend got nothing!

What??? I would be so upset by that. I would be ashamed to send a kid home hungry, and incensed if my son got nothing to eat for that long other than crisps. That's three missed meals. Would it have killed that dad to pour a bowl of cereal, or make a piece of toast? I would also wonder why the dad didn't feed your son's friend. What the heck was going on there?