Author Topic: Taking advantage of generosity  (Read 13928 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2014, 03:35:43 PM »
Under certain circumstances free is awesome. My district was cleaning out a couple of warehouses a few years ago. They were full of items that were donated, out of date, remnants, and so on.  I filled up my truck 4 times before I got tired.  I have yet to buy any highlighters, heavy weight paper, t-shirt transfers, white butcher paper, or labels.  I also have 30 cases of binders and 3 cases of promo bags the size of overnight bags that are heavyweight nylon with a long side pocket with a zipper and a top zipper.  Sure, some of the stuff was unusable - some highlighters were dry and some labels did not stick,  but overall I made out like a bandit.  The other teachers who bothered to go made out similarly.  I've given away a ton of stuff and still have a closet full and a corner in the garage packed.

Definitely, in your case! Esp if others can benefit from what's being given away.

veronaz

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2014, 04:01:22 PM »
Jloreli – your post reminded me of someone I worked with a looooooog time ago.

She was like your boss, except there was no husband or kids at home.

But the topper:
There was a conference (with a large buffet) held when she was on vacation.  The hotel was near the suburb where she lived.  Several of us were sitting around eating……suddenly Greedy Co-Worker appears out of nowhere (in shorts and a t-shirt), and she was carrying several Tupperware-type bowls/containers.  I kid you not!  She came just to stock up on free food.  :o Then she left.  We all looked at each other as if………we could not believe our eyes.

GratefulMaria

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2014, 04:55:23 PM »
Ugh, I used to work in an office as a receptionist, the woman who had the job before me had a candy jar and would keep it stocked with things. When I took over the position, it was expected that I was to keep the jar filled. I'd buy a few bags here or there, but I would more often than not just take the jar off my desk, as no one ever offered to reimburse me for the money that I was spending on the candy.

I worked there for three years and at least twice a month coworkers would come up to me and ask where the candy was.

It should be noted that I was the lowest paid employee by far in the entire place and was just barely making ends meet for myself, my coworkers could have bought their own bags of candies.

Not to mention, if there is candy in front of me, I'm going to eat it, and I did not need that temptation. :)

I, too, was on the receiving end of inherited entitlement.  "You know, GratefulMaria, Jeanne used to bake things from scratch and bring them in for all of us!"  No.

magicdomino

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2014, 05:54:25 PM »
Another former candy jar person here.  I didn't even have the good candy; it was Double Bubble or Bazooka bubble gum, carefully chosen because I didn't like it that much.  Maybe I didn't but somebody did.  I was spending about $5 or $6 a week on bulk bubble gum at one point.  The division chief would stick a dollar or two in the jar, and once in a while I'd find some change, but it got too expensive after a while.

Queen of Clubs

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2014, 06:21:52 PM »
Ugh, I used to work in an office as a receptionist, the woman who had the job before me had a candy jar and would keep it stocked with things. When I took over the position, it was expected that I was to keep the jar filled. I'd buy a few bags here or there, but I would more often than not just take the jar off my desk, as no one ever offered to reimburse me for the money that I was spending on the candy.

I worked there for three years and at least twice a month coworkers would come up to me and ask where the candy was.

It should be noted that I was the lowest paid employee by far in the entire place and was just barely making ends meet for myself, my coworkers could have bought their own bags of candies.

Not to mention, if there is candy in front of me, I'm going to eat it, and I did not need that temptation. :)

I, too, was on the receiving end of inherited entitlement.  "You know, GratefulMaria, Jeanne used to bake things from scratch and bring them in for all of us!"  No.

I wonder if Jeanne and/or the former receptionist left because they got tired of their coworkers circling with their hands held out.

veronaz

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2014, 06:47:04 PM »
The thing is, people get to where they expect the candy/goodies.

OTOH, I worked in an office where the owner gave the receptionist money every month to get candy, mints, etc. for the lobby.  They gave her enough to get really high quality candy and chocolates.  She enjoyed selecting the treats.

Lady Eboshi

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2014, 07:52:27 PM »
I kept thinking of this while reading the stories of the Candy Gimme Pigs:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNBS1PpouTA

purple

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2014, 08:29:52 PM »
Current candy jar hostess here - I'm sitting at my desk right now and so is my candy jar  :)

I just joined this company 3 months ago and implemented my candy jar in my second week here.  My candy jar had encountered many of the problems that you all have noted above at my previous employment.

Here, so far, so good!  I mean, I do pay for the majority of the candy that's gone in, but I expect that.  I just buy what's on sale when I do my regular grocery shop, probably about $10 a week I suppose.  If I didn't want to do the candy jar, I wouldn't.

None of the people here have ever had a team candy jar situation, so it's all new to them.  A few of them have just started in the last couple of weeks 'getting it' and bringing in a bag of lollies to contribute  :).  Some of them have tried to give me a few coins, but I just politely say "No, no need to pay for candy.  Just take some candy out when you feel like it and put some candy in when you feel like it".  Of course, there are some who take way more than I feel any one person probably should (and some people haven't contributed any candy at all!), but you're always going to get that...that's just....people.  I don't mind.  What I find interesting is the way that some people go about the whole contribution thing also.  Sometimes I will just come in to work and there's a bag of lollies been left anonymously on my desk.  Other people will go out of their way to make sure that I (and others) all see them giving the lollies.  It makes me laugh  :)

Bluenomi

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2014, 01:00:36 AM »
3 times a year we have really, really busy weeks at work. Most staff are doing 14 hour days all week. Since I'm the meanie who rosters them I make cookies and cupcakes on the last day of each week as a thank you and treat.

Most people love it and are very thankful and look forward to it but a few get greedy and start trying to put in orders for what they want. I put everything in front of my desk and make sure everyone gets some before others get seconds and I've had to be very firm with some. I also told my maternity leave replacement that she is not expected to do it and tell them off is they pressure her to bake!

spookycatlady

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2014, 07:57:06 AM »
There's a long story, but our team has an automatic candy dispenser-- no filthy hands rummaging through the M&Ms.  We decided one type and everyone has taken a turn filling it-- if we can get a chance.  Our boss's boss roams the floor late at night looking for chocolate.  She's famous for it.  No one minds because she will top up whatever she takes with 10 times the amount. 

We keep it at a low-traffic desk, out of the line of sight.  For one day, we had to keep it my cubicle, which is on the main thoroughfare.  People from other teams (who do not contribute) started helping themselves without asking.  These are people who never cross my path personally or professionally...  We squirrelled it away as soon as possible after that.

weeblewobble

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2014, 08:25:48 AM »
My mom is a heck of a cook, and worked at a school where the teachers simply didn't know how to bake. (Not even elaborate stuff.  They marveled at fairly basic cakes and cookies as if they were major accomplishments.) So whenever Mom wanted to try a new recipe, she'd bring in the results and share them with the other teachers in the lounge.  After a couple of years, though, a few bad apples ruined it for her and she stopped.

-the assistant who saw the huge three layer cake Mom brought in for a staff party, cut HALF of it away and spirited the half-cake out to her car because, "her kids like chocolate."

-the teachers who thought that they should critique Mom's cookies, (Too dry!  Too much coconut!  Why no walnuts?) when they could barely manage to open a bag of Oreos. 

- the people who complained that Mom was ruining their diets.

- The teacher who took home Mom's tupperware before Mom could get it out of the teacher's lounge because he wanted to take SEVERAL DOZEN cookies home with him "for his family."  This happened twice before Mom switched to plastic baggies.

The coup de cake was when Mom brought in a a delicious apple caramel pie for a holiday and a lady stopped by Mom's classroom to tell her that Mom's pie wasn't "quite up to the usual standard" and for future reference, this lady preferred meringue pies.  Mom gave her the dreaded teacher eyeball and told her, "Then you'd better learn to make meringue."


BabyMama

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2014, 09:09:38 AM »
I started a candy jar a few years ago, when my department merged with another. My desk was on the main path, and I thought it would be a nice "break the ice, get to know you" sort of motivator, as not everyone was pleased with the merger and previous to that we had been sort of adversaries (not like enemies or anything, but two similar parallel departments...there's some "yours and ours" going on there.)

Almost nobody would stop by for candy, but I noticed the amount continued to go down. I learned much later that many people would wait until after I left to take candy. That's nice, folks  ::)
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Coralreef

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2014, 09:55:17 AM »
As an individual, I would not have a candy jar, way too much trouble, money and whining. 

We have a candy jar, but the company pays for it.  When it's empty, it can remain empty for a long while. And the company buys large quantities of candy bars and chips at a superstore and resells them at a low price to employees.  The funds are used for the annual corn/hot dog cook out. 


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mumma to KMC

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #28 on: February 11, 2014, 10:05:18 AM »
I started a candy jar a few years ago, when my department merged with another. My desk was on the main path, and I thought it would be a nice "break the ice, get to know you" sort of motivator, as not everyone was pleased with the merger and previous to that we had been sort of adversaries (not like enemies or anything, but two similar parallel departments...there's some "yours and ours" going on there.)

Almost nobody would stop by for candy, but I noticed the amount continued to go down. I learned much later that many people would wait until after I left to take candy. That's nice, folks  ::)

There were a few times at the job I mentioned above where I would bring in doughnuts (Fat Tuesday for example) or maybe pick up bagels. I'd set them in the common area and as people would come in to work, I'd mention there were doughnuts in the commons. I'd often get a response "oh, I'm on a diet." or "I already ate breakfast" or "Maybe some other time." yet by lunch, they were all gone. :/


Lynn2000

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Re: Taking advantage of generosity
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2014, 10:36:27 AM »
Sometimes I bring cookies in to work that my mom makes. People are definitely polite about them, so that's nice. The funny thing is, I almost never see anyone actually eating them. But when I come in the next morning, the amount has decreased noticeably from what was there the previous afternoon. I think we must have some evening snackers around here! In this case that's okay with me, because it's never as egregious as someone taking the whole container before anyone else gets some. In fact, the last time she made cookies, there were some leftover when the weekend came, and I "had" to take them home and eat them myself. First time ever! We have fewer people now, and a lot of people seem to be on diets or can't eat this or that. Just doesn't seem like as much of a treat anymore.
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