Author Topic: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?  (Read 4372 times)

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CakeEater

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Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« on: February 12, 2014, 06:48:27 AM »
Asked with every affection for our Americans cousins. :)

Starts with Halloween, Thanksgiving not long after, then Christmas and New Year's, Valentine's Day and then Easter in another month or so.

I'm sure I'm missing some.

I feel like I'm still getting over Christmas, and you're having to make Valentines to send to school? How do you cope?

Corvid

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2014, 07:13:18 AM »
Forget celebrations.  I want to have all the holidays off and vacation time my European coworkers did when I was stationed overseas.  We do not get enough time off work.  Deity forbid you take more than one of your vacation weeks at a time.  Well, we say "week", but it's really only five days, isn't it?  Most of us have ten vacation days a year, not really "two weeks".

Acadianna

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2014, 07:36:38 AM »
And in New Orleans, there's Mardi Gras, which is a huge celebration.  Carnival season officially begins on January 6 (Feast of the Epiphany, or King's Day) and runs until Mardi Gras day (this date varies, but it's in February or early March).  The last two or three weeks, there are parades every night, and balls for those who attend them.

123sandy

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2014, 07:47:55 AM »
To be fair, apart from Thanksgiving, don't most of us celebrate those holidays?

perpetua

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2014, 07:52:36 AM »
To be fair, apart from Thanksgiving, don't most of us celebrate those holidays?

I don't know that we really 'celebrate' them; they're in the calendar, but we certainly don't make as big a thing of them. Holidays like Valentine's Day and Halloween seem to be a far bigger deal in the states than they are here. Valentine's, for example: sure, couples might go out for a nice meal and send each other cards and flowers, but we don't tend to go all out and involve the kids in the same way.

Jones

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2014, 07:56:33 AM »
There's "big" holidays, like Halloween and Christmas (for me) and "small" holidays that are mostly an excuse for special dinner and staying up late, like New Years and Valentines (again, for me; other people have other holiday priorities). I had never really thought about it before but I don't think I've ever burned out on a holiday...I do try to keep Easter and Christmas simple, though. Not much to recover from...a few gifts, some candy, let the children have some excitement, some casual extended family mingling, dinner, and sleep in the next day.

peaches

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2014, 08:05:14 AM »
Yes.

Although, when our kids were growing up, they loved holidays, each and every one. Over time, we dialed back on that stuff.

Oh, and you left out Fourth of July (a big one), Veterans Day, Memorial Day, Mothers Day, Fathers Day.

I think that Americans, in general, overdo a lot of things. This may be a result of the gung-ho enthusiasm we bring to most enterprises (which can be a good thing, too!).




Piratelvr1121

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2014, 08:28:09 AM »
My friend in retail gets tired of it.  She loves Halloween but she also knows that after Halloween she's going to have to deal with people whining that there's not enough Thanksgiving cards/decor/etc., "Why don't you have more Hallmark ornaments?" "Why is Christmas out before Thanksgiving?" "What do you mean you're out of this gift and won't order more two days before Christmas?"  ::)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Dindrane

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2014, 08:45:57 AM »
To be fair, apart from Thanksgiving, don't most of us celebrate those holidays?

I don't know that we really 'celebrate' them; they're in the calendar, but we certainly don't make as big a thing of them. Holidays like Valentine's Day and Halloween seem to be a far bigger deal in the states than they are here. Valentine's, for example: sure, couples might go out for a nice meal and send each other cards and flowers, but we don't tend to go all out and involve the kids in the same way.

How much people do to observe the holidays is pretty dependent upon the specific person/family. For me, the only reasons I'm going to put any sort of effort into celebrating a holiday is if it's either a day I get off of work, or a day that has religious significance for me. As a general thing, if the US federal government doesn't celebrate the holiday, my workplace doesn't either (and I think the federal government observes a couple more holidays than my workplace does).

I don't get time off for Halloween or Valentine's Day or St. Patrick's Day, so I don't tend to do anything in particular to celebrate them. I have no idea if my practices constitute the majority or not, but I do know a lot of people who don't do much more than notice the holiday marked on the calendar before moving on.

Stores and media outlets can and do make a big deal of all of the various holidays Americans tend to be aware of, but I don't think any of them are celebrated with as much fanfare as they might look just based on stores and the media. At least not across the population as a whole.


Jones

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2014, 08:54:38 AM »
I agree with Dindrane...there are a lot if holidays I consider "small" and barely notice, such as Labor Day, Flag Day or St Patricks. Other people choose to go all out on St Patricks or take a mini vacation on Labor Day weekend. I don't think I know anyone who goes all out for every holiday there is.


Oh Joy

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2014, 09:04:57 AM »
Instead of a long rant about the downside of the intersection of economic prosperity and inexpensive consumer goods, I'll just say this: when everything is special, nothing is special.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2014, 09:11:51 AM »
My own favorite holidays are Halloween, Christmas and St. Patrick's Day.  St. Patrick's is pretty low key for us but I always enjoy celebrating it. :)  I put a corned beef brisket in the crockpot with either potatoes or cabbage and have a Guinness or two. :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Yvaine

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2014, 09:28:02 AM »
To be fair, apart from Thanksgiving, don't most of us celebrate those holidays?

I don't know that we really 'celebrate' them; they're in the calendar, but we certainly don't make as big a thing of them. Holidays like Valentine's Day and Halloween seem to be a far bigger deal in the states than they are here. Valentine's, for example: sure, couples might go out for a nice meal and send each other cards and flowers, but we don't tend to go all out and involve the kids in the same way.

I wouldn't say we in the US go all out on all those holidays either. Halloween is a pretty big thing in my circle of friends (since we're heavy on both costuming geeks and neopagans), and Thanksgiving and Christmas are usually full of family obligations, and then New Year's is usually a friends party again. But most people I know don't do much more for Valentine's Day beyond going out for a nice dinner if they're romantically involved (and maybe buying a box of valentines for school if they have kids), and not a lot has happened for St. Pat's after the college years in my experience.

There's merchandise for a lot of these holidays, and it gets put out right after (or even before) the last holiday ends, but that doesn't necessarily mean everybody's throwing a huge bash for every single one. Which is actually kind of a bummer for me because I love celebrating and love theme parties. I'll also agree with Dindrane that there's probably somebody celebrating every holiday you've heard of, but individuals tend to prioritize a few that mean more to them for whatever reason. There are a few people who go all-out for every single thing, but IME they're in the minority. My ex's mom rotated the house decorations to reflect every holiday she'd ever heard of, I think!

sunnygirl

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2014, 09:28:27 AM »
My best friend (UK) made a decision this year to try to celebrate every single holiday. We just did Chinese New Year and are looking for local Holi celebrations. One of the things I loved about the US was their Halloween celebrations - though I guess on the flipside I really missed 5th November (my second favourite holiday).

Hmmmmm

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Re: Americans - do you get sick of celebrating?
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2014, 10:42:32 AM »
I don't get sick of celebrating. Each person decides how much they want to participate with any holiday. There's no "minimal participation requirement". Some holidays are just dates on a calendar for us, others are minor fun, and others are major events.

For instance for Valentines, when the kids were in grade school I loved sitting down with them helping to get their valentine cards ready for their classmates. It was a fun activity and it was also a way to discuss friendships and relationships when conversations like "I don't like her and don't want to give her a card" or "I can't give him that one, he'll think I like him" came up. Now that they're older it's hardly a blip on our schedule for February other than I know there will be chocolate for me and DH knows there will be chocolate covered cherries for him.

Christmas, Thanksgiving & Easter would be the big ones for us. When we used to host a haunted house I would have included Halloween in that list. But now it would be a minor one because it's pretty much just handing out candy now.

4th of July, Memorial Day & New Years would be medium as they usually involve attending or hosting a party.