Author Topic: s/o Friday morn wedding: what are the common wedding times/days where you live?  (Read 3061 times)

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cicero

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In the other thread , many posters were saying how most weddings they've been to are on Saturday or Sunday. I was wondering about that- in Israel, where the weekend is usually friday-saturday ( and having a wedding friday night or Saturday during the day is not possible due to religious reasons), weddings ( and other events like bar mitzvah etc) are held mid week ( evening) with Thursday night being the coveted night as well as friday morning. But certainly I've been to weddings and other events every day of the week.

Bar mitzvah and bris ( circumcision) are often held in the morning ( at least the ritual part as it's part of the morning prayers), mid week.

How about where you live?

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Lynn2000

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Midwest US. In my circle I would say Saturday is the most common day. Usually late morning/early afternoon--like a 10am wedding or a 2pm wedding.

Friday evening or Sunday afternoon/evening would not surprise me much, either. Other days and times would surprise me a little, for a "big" wedding anyway--if it's a very small gathering I would assume the time/day was based on what worked best for all the guests.
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mechtilde

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I'm in England. Most weddings take place on a Saturday. The most popular time here is 2.30pm.

Summer weddings are more popular here, so people do sometimes have to compromise on the time of wedding to fit in with place of worship or registrar schedules. I've started at 8am and gone through to a 4.30pm wedding before now, with eight in a day. They have to take place during daytime in England, but things are different in Scotland.
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cattlekid

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Most of the weddings we are invited to are for DH's family.  In their church, weddings are usually at either 3:00 PM or 3:30 PM on Saturday afternoons.  This allows for all of the culturally expected morning/early afternoon activities prior to the wedding and gets the wedding over and the wedding party cleared out of the church before evening vespers at 6 PM. 


nuit93

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Pacific Northwest here, I don't think I've been to a single wedding that wasn't on a Saturday afternoon.  Big posh event or courthouse wedding, they're all between 1-6pm on Saturdays.

camlan

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Most of the weddings I've been to have been Catholic weddings, and mostly in New England.

Usually on Saturday. Because there is a Saturday evening Mass at most churches, the weddings have to be over by 3 or 4 pm. Usually, there is a choice between, say, 11 am, 1 pm, 2 pm or 3 pm.

In the Boston area, the Catholic churches have large congregations, and it's not unusual to have 2 or 3 weddings on the same day.

Catholics can be married on Sunday, but many parishes don't allow Sunday weddings because the church and priests are busy most of the day with multiple Masses.

The only day a Catholic can't get married is Ash Wednesday. And individual parishes/dioceses may have other limitations--i.e. some don't allow weddings during Advent and Lent.

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Hmmmmm

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I live in Texas and all the Christian weddings I've attended accept one was on Saturdays. The most popular time for Protestant weddings is 7pm (maybe 6pm) and Catholics are usually 2pm. But I've also attended morning weddings with a lunch afterwards, lots of afternoon weddings with a reception immediately following, and one Friday evening wedding.

LemonZen

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Western Canada here. I think every wedding I have been to (except one) has been Saturday afternoon with a dinner reception. The one exception was a Friday evening (7 pm) with a cocktail reception immediately following.

ladyknight1

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Florida US here.

Out of ten weddings.

Friday. One afternoon 3 PM, followed by a cocktail reception. One evening 7 pm, followed by a dinner.

Saturday. Three 10-11 AM weddings, followed by a lunch. The remainder were afternoon weddings, most with a large break before the reception.

I would rather attend a daytime wedding on Friday, immediately followed by the reception, than spend 6+ hours between a wedding and reception. My least favorite are receptions with a different dress code than the wedding.

lowspark

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I'm in Texas too. Jewish weddings here are normally held on Saturday night (most likely in the winter months) or Sunday afternoon or evening. The Christian and non-religious weddings I've been to are always on Saturday. I've been to morning, afternoon and evening weddings.

I've never been invited to, nor even really been aware of weddings taking place on weekdays/weeknights other than people going down the courthouse for a quick civil ceremony.

jmarvellous

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Saturday late morning to early evening for nonreligious, Christian, or Buddhist weddings, in experiences across the US. Afternoon to late night receptions depending on duration and ceremony time.

Others, I can't really say. I've known a few Jewish couples who were married later on Saturday, but I've never been to the weddings.

Thipu1

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In my experience, Christian weddings are usually celebrated on Saturday mornings and Jewish weddings are usually celebrated on a Sunday.

For a while, it was fashionable in our neighborhood to get married on a Friday evening.  That was in the 1980s and seems to have gone out of style.       

cicero

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Florida US here.

Out of ten weddings.

Friday. One afternoon 3 PM, followed by a cocktail reception. One evening 7 pm, followed by a dinner.

Saturday. Three 10-11 AM weddings, followed by a lunch. The remainder were afternoon weddings, most with a large break before the reception.

I would rather attend a daytime wedding on Friday, immediately followed by the reception, than spend 6+ hours between a wedding and reception. My least favorite are receptions with a different dress code than the wedding.
That's another difference - in israel there is no break. You arrive at the venue ( usually a wedding hall, sometimes a hotel, and once in a while if it's a hip/new agey couple it might be out in the desert somewhere). There is an elaborate smorgasbord, then the ceremony ( huppah - if possible it is held outside/garden/rooftop/balcony), then we go into the hall for dinner and dancing.all in the same venuy, and no visible gap.

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sammycat

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Australia. 

All the wedding ceremonies I've been to, or have heard about other people I know attending (in this country), have taken place on a Saturday between about 10am-4pm. They were all followed by a formal reception with either a full buffet or 2-3 course plated meal. Often there were Hors d'oeuvre and/or drinks served between ceremony and reception.


kareng57

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Saturdays are pretty much the norm here, although my kids have been to a number of Friday weddings during the last few years, and in fact DS #1 and his fiance have scheduled a Friday wedding later this year.  The venue charge is much less.  It's not that they charge more $$$ per guest on a Saturday, but that the required minimum total charge is much higher.

Most of the OOT guests are retired so it won't involve them taking any time of work.  And the wedding is not till 4 pm so most of the younger, local guests probably won't have to take more than a half-day off work.  Hey, I'm not saying that this is an ideal solution to the cost/number of guests dilemma.  But it looks as though it will work for them, and they certainly won't hold it against anyone who can't come because they can't get time off.  Realistically though - many people in their late 20s/early30s have jobs where they can't necessarily get Saturdays off, either.