Author Topic: Do I Tell My Director? UPDATE: Post 29  (Read 7671 times)

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BeagleMommy

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2014, 04:09:07 PM »
Thanks, guys.

I like the idea of keeping a list of the things I've trained her to do.  This was only my first day training her so I'm not sure I'll say anything unless it feels necessary.

My university is paying a temp agency to cover my job until I return in April so my director would not have known they were sending someone known to me.  I didn't even know she was coming until I was face to face with her this morning.

I'm going to give her the benefit of the doubt, for now.  Hopefully, she's improved.

tinkytinky

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2014, 12:17:55 PM »
It isn't a bad idea to have a whole work book/manual (hard to do in a hurry, I know), and possibly cross-train another person so that if there has to be a change of workers while you are gone, or there are questions they can be covered.
 

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StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2014, 12:22:36 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z. 

auntmeegs

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2014, 12:26:30 PM »
Say nothing.  I would hate to be judged on some things I did 12 years ago, wouldn't you?

veronaz

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2014, 12:36:59 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z.

I disagree with this.  Asking a temp to sign such a list reeks of someone trying to cover themself/make a case, and it's too legalistic.  If someone is that uncomfortable and distrustful about the person replacing them, they need to get someone else.

However, I think tinkytinky’s idea about a manual is good.  We did this at a job I had when I was about to go on medical leave, and it minimizes confusion and mistakes.




Deetee

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2014, 01:11:18 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z.

I disagree with this.  Asking a temp to sign such a list reeks of someone trying to cover themself/make a case, and it's too legalistic.  If someone is that uncomfortable and distrustful about the person replacing them, they need to get someone else.

However, I think tinkytinky’s idea about a manual is good.  We did this at a job I had when I was about to go on medical leave, and it minimizes confusion and mistakes.

I think it's a good idea and it doesn't need to be legally. I would treat it as sitting down and double checking with her that I passed on all the information and to give her a chance to ask any questions. So I would have a list with 12 things and I would expect us to sit down near the end of training and both initial or check off maybe 10 of them. Maybe give her the list and give her some time ask her to initial the items she was comfortable with and then review the ones that she identified as things that were still problematic. Basically treat it as a tool to help her understand and do the job properly, not a tool to catch her out.

Even if she was the bestest employee that ever was an employee, I think such a list is a good idea.

TootsNYC

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2014, 01:27:39 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z.

I disagree with this.  Asking a temp to sign such a list reeks of someone trying to cover themself/make a case, and it's too legalistic.  If someone is that uncomfortable and distrustful about the person replacing them, they need to get someone else.

However, I think tinkytinky’s idea about a manual is good.  We did this at a job I had when I was about to go on medical leave, and it minimizes confusion and mistakes.

I think it's a good idea and it doesn't need to be legally. I would treat it as sitting down and double checking with her that I passed on all the information and to give her a chance to ask any questions. So I would have a list with 12 things and I would expect us to sit down near the end of training and both initial or check off maybe 10 of them. Maybe give her the list and give her some time ask her to initial the items she was comfortable with and then review the ones that she identified as things that were still problematic. Basically treat it as a tool to help her understand and do the job properly, not a tool to catch her out.

Even if she was the bestest employee that ever was an employee, I think such a list is a good idea.

The list is great.
Going over the list together is great.

The moment you ask her to sign it, you are saying, "I'm going to catch you out. If you forget something, I'm going to point to your signature and say, 'You signed this!' "

LazyDaisy

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2014, 01:40:13 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z.

I disagree with this.  Asking a temp to sign such a list reeks of someone trying to cover themself/make a case, and it's too legalistic.  If someone is that uncomfortable and distrustful about the person replacing them, they need to get someone else.

However, I think tinkytinky’s idea about a manual is good.  We did this at a job I had when I was about to go on medical leave, and it minimizes confusion and mistakes.

I think it's a good idea and it doesn't need to be legally. I would treat it as sitting down and double checking with her that I passed on all the information and to give her a chance to ask any questions. So I would have a list with 12 things and I would expect us to sit down near the end of training and both initial or check off maybe 10 of them. Maybe give her the list and give her some time ask her to initial the items she was comfortable with and then review the ones that she identified as things that were still problematic. Basically treat it as a tool to help her understand and do the job properly, not a tool to catch her out.

Even if she was the bestest employee that ever was an employee, I think such a list is a good idea.

The list is great.
Going over the list together is great.

The moment you ask her to sign it, you are saying, "I'm going to catch you out. If you forget something, I'm going to point to your signature and say, 'You signed this!' "
I make people sign proofs and initial that they have read agreements or approve things all the time. It's just a part of business. It covers me, but it also covers them. If something goes wrong it's important to know where the breakdown happened, not just to point fingers, but to ensure that it won't happen again. If I send the wrong file to print or something is changed after the document has been approved, their signature or initials can prove that I messed up or didn't give them the correct information. In my experience, asking someone to sign or initial suddenly inspires them to actually read it and pay attention. Then, if there are areas that the signee doesn't remember being covered or didn't understand, when she's asked to initial, she has an opportunity to speak up, "Oh, item #4, we were interrupted when you were going to tell me who should be CC'd on that, and the deadline, can you go over that again please?"
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veronaz

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2014, 01:40:41 PM »
TootsNYC said:
Quote
The list is great.
Going over the list together is great.

The moment you ask her to sign it, you are saying, "I'm going to catch you out. If you forget something, I'm going to point to your signature and say, 'You signed this!' "

Exactly.

A temp would have to be completely clueless – actually stupid - not to realize it was a setup.

Frankly, if I was the temp I’d excuse myself, call my agency and ask them to find me another assignment and send someone else because things were getting very weird and uncomfortable.  I wouldn’t want to deal with the cloak-and-dagger nonsense.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2014, 02:50:11 PM »
I would also consider having her sign the list of things you've trained her to do, so that you have a record that she received the training and acknowledged that she received it.  Otherwise she can still claim that you didn't tell her about X, Y, Z.

I disagree with this.  Asking a temp to sign such a list reeks of someone trying to cover themself/make a case, and it's too legalistic.  If someone is that uncomfortable and distrustful about the person replacing them, they need to get someone else.

However, I think tinkytinky’s idea about a manual is good.  We did this at a job I had when I was about to go on medical leave, and it minimizes confusion and mistakes.

I think it's a good idea and it doesn't need to be legally. I would treat it as sitting down and double checking with her that I passed on all the information and to give her a chance to ask any questions. So I would have a list with 12 things and I would expect us to sit down near the end of training and both initial or check off maybe 10 of them. Maybe give her the list and give her some time ask her to initial the items she was comfortable with and then review the ones that she identified as things that were still problematic. Basically treat it as a tool to help her understand and do the job properly, not a tool to catch her out.

Even if she was the bestest employee that ever was an employee, I think such a list is a good idea.

This is what I meant.  I wouldn't make it a legal document, more like a checklist with initials from both parties.

BeagleMommy

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2014, 04:09:15 PM »
My director and I will be sitting down with her at the end of this week to go over the training list to make sure I've covered everything.

Next week I will sit back and let her do everything herself and will make corrections as necessary.  She's taken pretty good notes, so I hope she'll work out.

I've decided not to say anything unless a problem arises.

TootsNYC

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2014, 04:20:29 PM »
Sounds like you guys have a very sensible plan!
And you have a really good opportunity to observe.

veronaz

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #27 on: March 05, 2014, 04:26:34 PM »
BeagleMommy, sounds like a good plan.  Hope there won't be any issues and that you can relax and not worry during your time off.

Years ago I did some temp work, and I also have had to train temps to cover my duties.  It's always good to train, answer questions, then watch the temp actually do the job and see how it goes.

Just to clarify – I didn’t mean that anything you were doing is nonsense.  I was referring to hypothetical suggestions about asking temp to “sign off” or initial what obviously is a trap for someone to cover themselves and make a 'case' later. 
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 04:29:34 PM by veronaz »

Lynn2000

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2014, 04:57:41 PM »
My director and I will be sitting down with her at the end of this week to go over the training list to make sure I've covered everything.

Next week I will sit back and let her do everything herself and will make corrections as necessary.  She's taken pretty good notes, so I hope she'll work out.

I've decided not to say anything unless a problem arises.

This sounds like a good plan. Twelve years is a long time, and I agree it also depends on which twelve years--I work with a lot of college-student interns and I can definitely see how someone who was kind of flaky at 20 would hopefully mature by 32. I really hope I wouldn't be judged on what I was like 12 years ago! :)

And, with this plan, the nice thing is, you don't have to ever say, "She was like this 12 years ago." If she messes up, you'll be able to say, "Boss, she and I went over this, you double-checked, I watched her do it correctly. I don't know what more I could have done."
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BeagleMommy

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Re: Do I Tell My Director?
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2014, 03:18:19 PM »
Update:  Well, I've been back for three weeks and I am still finding things she messed up.  No change after 12 years!

The most important thing she had to do was make sure all incoming applications were printed and routed to the appropriate coordinator.  I gave her detailed directions and she took copious notes.  Had she missed one I wouldn't be upset, but she missed four (one dated March 27; I returned April 7).

She put the wrong dates in the statistical chart we use to track enrollment.  Again, she took notes and I gave detailed directions (written).

An applicant review came in from one of the satellites on March 18.  She didn't print it and forward it until April 4.  Same type of notes and directions.

The topper?  Before I left for leave she asked if I'd give her a reference because she was applying for a permanent job with my university and "you know me".