Author Topic: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)  (Read 67479 times)

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MommyPenguin

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #150 on: March 10, 2014, 05:11:14 PM »
Do they ask that of men too?
Last time I was at the docs they didn't ask me that. I went in with a broken toe - he just asked how I broke it.

My husband has been asked this, so at least sometimes men are asked as well.

I went in with a toe I thought was broken, and another time with a bump on my ankle that they initially thought was a stress fracture, and neither time was I asked.  I think sometimes it might be the nature of the injury, and other times the procedures of that particular ER/hospital/doctor's office, perhaps also influenced by the area/clientele.

perpetua

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #151 on: March 10, 2014, 07:15:44 PM »
Quote
I hope you don't feel badly about that.  How were you supposed to know?  You`re not a mind-reader.  If I saw a pie, and nobody told me otherwise, I'd presume it was a dessert item.


Really?  That's I interesting to me.  Are you American?  Do you have a much bigger tradition of sweet pies than savoury?  I'm British, and I'd find a savoury pie as likely as sweet.

We really just don't "do" savory pies in the US.  Most people would know what chicken pot pie and maybe shepherds pie are, but those are very definite exceptions - and (apart from chicken pot pie) pretty much any savory pie you might find here would be considered a British (i.e. "ethnic") dish.  We definitely don't do the combination of meat + sweet that y'all have over there - an English friend brought some mince pies to a Christmas party and nearly everyone thought they were really odd.  (I loved them, but then I do love sweet dishes in just about every variety . . .)

But mince pies don't contain meat ( which isn't to say they are necessarily vegetarian lard and suet may be in the recipe)

They used to - but I think that's only done by historically inclined foodies today.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10476667/Potted-histories-mince-pies.html

We do have pies that contain mince - usually mince and onion - but they're not the same thing as 'mince pies'. Mince pies are sweet and what you have at Christmas and contain 'mincemeat'. It's a different thing.

('Mince' is what we call the thing that you guys call 'ground beef'.)

We have lots of different kinds of savoury pies over here. Minced beef and onion, steak and ale, chicken and mushroom, chicken and leek, steak and kidney - all sorts. If it's got meat and veg in it, it can probably be fashioned into some kind of pie :)

aiki

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #152 on: March 10, 2014, 08:36:49 PM »
Quote
I hope you don't feel badly about that.  How were you supposed to know?  You`re not a mind-reader.  If I saw a pie, and nobody told me otherwise, I'd presume it was a dessert item.


Really?  That's I interesting to me.  Are you American?  Do you have a much bigger tradition of sweet pies than savoury?  I'm British, and I'd find a savoury pie as likely as sweet.

We really just don't "do" savory pies in the US.  Most people would know what chicken pot pie and maybe shepherds pie are, but those are very definite exceptions - and (apart from chicken pot pie) pretty much any savory pie you might find here would be considered a British (i.e. "ethnic") dish.  We definitely don't do the combination of meat + sweet that y'all have over there - an English friend brought some mince pies to a Christmas party and nearly everyone thought they were really odd.  (I loved them, but then I do love sweet dishes in just about every variety . . .)

But mince pies don't contain meat ( which isn't to say they are necessarily vegetarian lard and suet may be in the recipe)

They used to - but I think that's only done by historically inclined foodies today.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10476667/Potted-histories-mince-pies.html

We do have pies that contain mince - usually mince and onion - but they're not the same thing as 'mince pies'. Mince pies are sweet and what you have at Christmas and contain 'mincemeat'. It's a different thing.

('Mince' is what we call the thing that you guys call 'ground beef'.)

We have lots of different kinds of savoury pies over here. Minced beef and onion, steak and ale, chicken and mushroom, chicken and leek, steak and kidney - all sorts. If it's got meat and veg in it, it can probably be fashioned into some kind of pie :)

Heh. I'm a New Zealander. I am fully cognizant of the glories of meat encased in pastry, in all of its various forms. My personal fave is a good Steak and Cheese. But yes, a mince pie and a Christmas mince pie are two entirely different things. :)

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Firecat

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #153 on: March 10, 2014, 08:47:01 PM »
Quote
I hope you don't feel badly about that.  How were you supposed to know?  You`re not a mind-reader.  If I saw a pie, and nobody told me otherwise, I'd presume it was a dessert item.


Really?  That's I interesting to me.  Are you American?  Do you have a much bigger tradition of sweet pies than savoury?  I'm British, and I'd find a savoury pie as likely as sweet.

We really just don't "do" savory pies in the US.  Most people would know what chicken pot pie and maybe shepherds pie are, but those are very definite exceptions - and (apart from chicken pot pie) pretty much any savory pie you might find here would be considered a British (i.e. "ethnic") dish.  We definitely don't do the combination of meat + sweet that y'all have over there - an English friend brought some mince pies to a Christmas party and nearly everyone thought they were really odd.  (I loved them, but then I do love sweet dishes in just about every variety . . .)

But mince pies don't contain meat ( which isn't to say they are necessarily vegetarian lard and suet may be in the recipe)

They used to - but I think that's only done by historically inclined foodies today.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10476667/Potted-histories-mince-pies.html

We do have pies that contain mince - usually mince and onion - but they're not the same thing as 'mince pies'. Mince pies are sweet and what you have at Christmas and contain 'mincemeat'. It's a different thing.

('Mince' is what we call the thing that you guys call 'ground beef'.)

We have lots of different kinds of savoury pies over here. Minced beef and onion, steak and ale, chicken and mushroom, chicken and leek, steak and kidney - all sorts. If it's got meat and veg in it, it can probably be fashioned into some kind of pie :)

Our favorite pub (I'm in Minnesota) just had a British pie week...they had a ham and three cheese, a mince and onion, I think one with lamb, and a few others. I've had a lovely steak and mushroom pie there, too.

MizA

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #154 on: March 10, 2014, 09:39:06 PM »
Do they ask that of men too?
Last time I was at the docs they didn't ask me that. I went in with a broken toe - he just asked how I broke it.

Just to revisit this question- it varies from place to place, but where I live, we ask this question of everyone we admit to hospital, regardless of sex.
)'( The world would rather hug you than hurt you )'(

lilfox

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #155 on: March 10, 2014, 09:49:46 PM »
A while ago I started making hash brown scramble for DD and myself for brunch a few times a month.  I buy frozen potato shreds (literally shredded potato, no added seasoning) and fry them up, add scrambled egg and sometimes crumbled bacon.  I also like to cook things with as raw and natural ingredients as possible these days, to make up for my own decades of lousy eating and instill good habits in DD.

DH decides that it would be healthier if I used fresh potatoes, and gets me a salad shooter that has a special potato shredding blade set. Here's how it works:

  • First, I assemble the thing, which has 5 parts.
    Then, I wash and peel the potatoes, and possibly cut into chunks to fit down the feeder chute.
    Then I shred, aiming the 'spout' into a colander while simultaneously pushing the potato pieces down in a smooth motion.
    Then I bang the spout against the colander because the shreds do not shoot into the bowl on their own.
    Then I partially disassemble the device to get out the shreds that are stuck to the inside of the spout, the blades, and the feeder tube.  (This includes one or more large misshapen chunks that somehow refused to shred.)
    Then I rinse the shreds and try to dry them because otherwise they will mush together when I go to fry them.
    Oh, then I get to finally fry them, where they will still kind of mush because it is really hard to sufficiently dry a waterlogged mound of potato shreds.
    And last, I completely disassemble the device in order to clean it while the shreds are frying because I now have that kind of time, since it takes 2x longer to fry up fresh shreds than frozen.

So, to sum up:  DH gave me an appliance that allows me to use fresh potatoes and more than doubles the time and effort of my "easy" brunch meal.

whatsanenigma

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #156 on: March 10, 2014, 09:58:03 PM »
A while ago I started making hash brown scramble for DD and myself for brunch a few times a month.  I buy frozen potato shreds (literally shredded potato, no added seasoning) and fry them up, add scrambled egg and sometimes crumbled bacon.  I also like to cook things with as raw and natural ingredients as possible these days, to make up for my own decades of lousy eating and instill good habits in DD.

DH decides that it would be healthier if I used fresh potatoes, and gets me a salad shooter that has a special potato shredding blade set. Here's how it works:

  • First, I assemble the thing, which has 5 parts.
    Then, I wash and peel the potatoes, and possibly cut into chunks to fit down the feeder chute.
    Then I shred, aiming the 'spout' into a colander while simultaneously pushing the potato pieces down in a smooth motion.
    Then I bang the spout against the colander because the shreds do not shoot into the bowl on their own.
    Then I partially disassemble the device to get out the shreds that are stuck to the inside of the spout, the blades, and the feeder tube.  (This includes one or more large misshapen chunks that somehow refused to shred.)
    Then I rinse the shreds and try to dry them because otherwise they will mush together when I go to fry them.
    Oh, then I get to finally fry them, where they will still kind of mush because it is really hard to sufficiently dry a waterlogged mound of potato shreds.
    And last, I completely disassemble the device in order to clean it while the shreds are frying because I now have that kind of time, since it takes 2x longer to fry up fresh shreds than frozen.

So, to sum up:  DH gave me an appliance that allows me to use fresh potatoes and more than doubles the time and effort of my "easy" brunch meal.

Maybe you could shred potatoes in advance and freeze them? You still will be starting with fresh potatoes.  Maybe DH is worried about added salt or something in the ones you buy? (And maybe has never read the label, but still.)

Don't get me wrong, I do think this was a very nonhelpful way for him to help! He should have discussed it with you before buying the darn thing.  I'm just suggesting a way that you can make the best of the situation.  When life gives you a potato shredder, make frozen shredded potatoes, so to speak.   :)

doodlemor

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #157 on: March 10, 2014, 10:18:46 PM »
  When life gives you a potato shredder, make frozen shredded potatoes, so to speak.   :)

I would like to paraphrase whatsanenigma's advice to:  When husband gives you a potato shredder, husband makes frozen shredded potatoes.

Am I the only one who still has an old fashioned box grater?  It seems to me that the coarse side of that would make shredded potatoes without such a clean up mess.  The frozen shreds sound like the best deal, though.  It's unlikely that eating frozen potatoes several times a month would be lethal.


SCAJAfamily

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #158 on: March 10, 2014, 10:20:08 PM »
That reminds me when dh and I had been dating about a year and we walked through a Target and I randomly said "look a bread maker."  Six months later he bought me a bread maker for Christmas.  He thought he was doing a great job of reading me.  Actually I just pointed it out.  Then I felt guilty and felt I should make breads even though I had no desire to do so.

I love him so much (married for 15 years).
SCAJAfamily = dd S 22, ds C 15, ds A 12, dh J and myself dw A

whatsanenigma

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #159 on: March 10, 2014, 10:33:35 PM »
  When life gives you a potato shredder, make frozen shredded potatoes, so to speak.   :)

I would like to paraphrase whatsanenigma's advice to:  When husband gives you a potato shredder, husband makes frozen shredded potatoes.

Am I the only one who still has an old fashioned box grater?  It seems to me that the coarse side of that would make shredded potatoes without such a clean up mess.  The frozen shreds sound like the best deal, though.  It's unlikely that eating frozen potatoes several times a month would be lethal.

Ah, that could work well too! He can do the shredding in advance and then she can do the cooking as usual.

And I actually have one of those box graters, but I am always worried about scraping my knuckles or fingertips.  I've only used it for cheese and I end up "hand shredding" those last few bits so I don't get blood in the cheese, LOL.  But maybe some people are more graceful than I am.

crella

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #160 on: March 10, 2014, 10:34:55 PM »
Former short-term girlfriend who demanded wanted to help me renovate my house. 

I collect stamps.   A former girlfriend licked all of my mint stamps and stuck them to album pages because she was helping me while I was at work.

I just made a high-pitched "Hngggeeeennnnnnnnngh!!!!!" sort of noise!

Oh, I know, isn't that too awful?

Crella, I think you get the "Understatement of the Month" award.

I keep wondering how much money that will cost Julian's estate in the long run.


 :D :D :D I made the same noise, though, believe me! I just can't get my head around someone doing that.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #161 on: March 10, 2014, 11:24:46 PM »
  When life gives you a potato shredder, make frozen shredded potatoes, so to speak.   :)

I would like to paraphrase whatsanenigma's advice to:  When husband gives you a potato shredder, husband makes frozen shredded potatoes.

Am I the only one who still has an old fashioned box grater?  It seems to me that the coarse side of that would make shredded potatoes without such a clean up mess.  The frozen shreds sound like the best deal, though.  It's unlikely that eating frozen potatoes several times a month would be lethal.

Ah, that could work well too! He can do the shredding in advance and then she can do the cooking as usual.

And I actually have one of those box graters, but I am always worried about scraping my knuckles or fingertips.  I've only used it for cheese and I end up "hand shredding" those last few bits so I don't get blood in the cheese, LOL.  But maybe some people are more graceful than I am.

I don't like single use gadgets, but they make plastic handles with spikes that are designed to hold food that's being grated.  They are $1-$2 each and I saw them at Bed Bath and Beyond lately. 

jedikaiti

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #162 on: March 11, 2014, 12:13:29 AM »
  When life gives you a potato shredder, make frozen shredded potatoes, so to speak.   :)

I would like to paraphrase whatsanenigma's advice to:  When husband gives you a potato shredder, husband makes frozen shredded potatoes.

Am I the only one who still has an old fashioned box grater?  It seems to me that the coarse side of that would make shredded potatoes without such a clean up mess.  The frozen shreds sound like the best deal, though.  It's unlikely that eating frozen potatoes several times a month would be lethal.

Ah, that could work well too! He can do the shredding in advance and then she can do the cooking as usual.

And I actually have one of those box graters, but I am always worried about scraping my knuckles or fingertips.  I've only used it for cheese and I end up "hand shredding" those last few bits so I don't get blood in the cheese, LOL.  But maybe some people are more graceful than I am.

My husband likes to make hash browns, and his favorite method is to bake off the potatoes the night before, then hand-grate right before cooking.
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snowfire

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #163 on: March 11, 2014, 12:48:12 AM »
If you  happen to have a salad spinner, it works great on shredded potatoes for hash browns.

baglady

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Re: Stop helping me! (Share your stories)
« Reply #164 on: March 11, 2014, 01:15:20 AM »
Say "pie" to the average American, and s/he will think of a sweet dessert. Non-dessert (savory) pies are not unheard of here, but unless they are prefaced with "pot" or "shepherd's," we will assume that a pie is dessert. (And shepherd's pie isn't really a pie by our standards, because it doesn't have a pie crust. BTW, when I was a tyke, the school cafeteria called shepherd's pie "Chinese pie." Go figure. I've never seen mashed potatoes in a real Chinese dish.)

The other exception is pizza, but IME "pie" is only used in the ordering process: "I'd like a large pie with mushrooms and anchovies."

It was only when my job as a copy editor had me dealing with Canadian and British content that I learned "savoury" meant "not sweet." For decades before that, I'd assumed it was just a synonym for "tasty."
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