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  • November 27, 2015, 03:02:45 PM

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Author Topic: Daughter is a senior in high school now.  (Read 1807 times)

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Re: Daughter is a senior in high school now.
« Reply #30 on: September 18, 2015, 01:29:59 PM »
Yes, I feel like our guidance counselor began pushing college stuff at the start of junior year, and was pretty relentless about it. (Annoying to me as a kid!) When I took the ACT, I had to have several schools in mind where I wanted the results sent, because that was the last question on the test, and my recollection is I took that junior year. Of course things may vary by location and naturally not all guidance counselors are going to be on the ball.

One thing I haven't seen mentioned is classes she can take now, for college credit. Our tiny high school didn't have anything like this when I was a student, but even they have a couple AP classes now, and in bigger schools they have a whole suite of AP and dual-credit classes that can fulfill both high school requirements and college credits, shortening the amount of time you have to be in college. Or at least, making your schedule more flexible, because you don't have to squeeze in as many general education classes. One of my cousins attended her high school in the morning, then drove to the local community college for afternoon classes when she was a senior, for example. It's not a good plan for everyone but it's worth considering.

Also, I would carefully consider the money situation. A lot of graduates I know of, get a degree from a top school in their field, but find themselves spending the next ten or more years paying off student loans. Everyone thinks top school = top job but IME it doesn't at all these days. You don't want to have a miserable college experience just to save a few bucks, but if someone has stars in their eyes about an out-of-state, private, costly university, I would crunch the numbers and show them how long they will be paying for that dream, and figure out if it's really worth it over another choice.