Author Topic: Is tea time a meal?  (Read 3703 times)

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Ezeesee

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #45 on: March 22, 2014, 02:30:58 PM »
I grew up in as working-class an area as you can get, and the evening meal was always called tea. During the day we'd have breakfast - lunch - tea - supper (just before going to bed, it'd be toast or cereal). As I've moved further South though, I've noticed that 'tea' has become 'dinner', and now I'm in London I think I'm the only person I know who calls it tea. BTW, the actual drink tea is not involved with this in any way! Everybody here knows what I mean when I say tea rather than dinner though, so it's not an unusual term.

The only time we* have afternoon tea is on the weekend, when all meal times are shifted about a bit. Have a late breakfast, then find a teashop by mid-afternoon and settle in for the next few hours with a pot of proper tea and a 3-tier stand full of little cakes. Then maybe something else to eat about 9pm, but usually not a full meal.

The only time I've ever seen or heard of High Tea is in an Enid Blyton book, which I think had a farming family and this was their main meal of the day once everyone had come in from the fields.

A tea-break on the other hand, does involve the drink tea. Usually a couple of times a day when at work, about 11am and 3pm, when everyone descends on the kettle.

*By 'we' I mean my friends and I, not everyone in the UK  :)

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #46 on: March 23, 2014, 02:06:25 AM »
The confusion derives from this being the first time that I have encountered "tea" as a synonym for dinner or supper.  I understood "tea" to be an afternoon snack of some kind in the UK and elsewhere.  Tea is only a beverage here, except for rare places where it is offered as an afternoon snack, sometimes with enough food to make a light meal.  Dinner or supper is usually the most substantial meal of the day for Americans, and I thought that any meal that could be considered "tea" would be light.

Fruitcake is only served here at Christmas time, and most people dread it. I thought that perhaps it was a lighter dessert. 

Sorry to have stepped on any cultural toes.

CakeEater

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #47 on: March 23, 2014, 06:14:26 AM »
^I don't think many toes were stepped on - that's why we're here in this folder - to discuss these things!

We (UK and Australia) use dinner or tea to refer to the main evening meal. Supper is a snack close to bed time. Cake, or toast, or something pretty small with a hot chocolate, or cup of tea often. People don't always eat supper.

The afternoon snack is called afternoon tea.

No wonder there's confusion, right?

oz diva

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #48 on: March 23, 2014, 08:41:48 AM »
I think people are wary of fruitcake because they've never had good fruitcake. When I make it, it is a thing of beauty. Stuffed with dried fruit and little cake, with the odd nut for texture, doused in brandy. Mmmmm fruitcake.

Victoria

Psychopoesie

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #49 on: March 23, 2014, 08:53:54 AM »
Yeah, proper fruitcake is delicious - not to be dreaded at all.

Tini

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #50 on: March 23, 2014, 09:29:22 AM »
Bad fruitcake is the sweet equivalent of Terry Pratchett's dwarf bread.

veryfluffy

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #51 on: March 23, 2014, 10:58:27 AM »
I think people are wary of fruitcake because they've never had good fruitcake. When I make it, it is a thing of beauty. Stuffed with dried fruit and little cake, with the odd nut for texture, doused in brandy. Mmmmm fruitcake.

No, that sounds like fruitcake  :P. You can have my portion.
   

wx4caster

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2014, 01:08:54 PM »
I think people are wary of fruitcake because they've never had good fruitcake. When I make it, it is a thing of beauty. Stuffed with dried fruit and little cake, with the odd nut for texture, doused in brandy. Mmmmm fruitcake.

No, that sounds like fruitcake  :P. You can have my portion.

The best fruitcake I've ever had was doused with Amaretto, not brandy. Brandy is for crepes Suzette and coq au vin (i.e starting fires).
The days are long but the years are short.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2014, 06:40:18 PM »
You're making me want fruitcake now, at Easter time.

Teenyweeny

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2014, 08:13:20 PM »
You're making me want fruitcake now, at Easter time.

Then you shall have simnel cake my friend.
http://Http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simnel_cake



Psychopoesie

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #55 on: March 23, 2014, 08:41:49 PM »
^^something went wrong with the link above but it looks delectable.

Trying out the link to the Wikipedia page here to see if it works.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simnel_cake

oz diva

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #56 on: March 23, 2014, 09:05:20 PM »
I think people are wary of fruitcake because they've never had good fruitcake. When I make it, it is a thing of beauty. Stuffed with dried fruit and little cake, with the odd nut for texture, doused in brandy. Mmmmm fruitcake.

No, that sounds like fruitcake  :P. You can have my portion.

The best fruitcake I've ever had was doused with Amaretto, not brandy. Brandy is for crepes Suzette and coq au vin (i.e starting fires).
You can have my portion of that cake. Almond essence and amaretto are my kryptonite. 😜

Victoria

Margo

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2014, 07:25:53 AM »
You're making me want fruitcake now, at Easter time.

I've still got a little bit of my Christmas cake left. May have to have that when I get home tonight :-)

Yvaine

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #58 on: March 24, 2014, 09:50:16 AM »
Bad fruitcake is the sweet equivalent of Terry Pratchett's dwarf bread.


 ;D ;D ;D

I had "dwarf bread" this year in the form of a microwave dinner I really, really didn't want to eat. I'm not even sure how or why I bought it. It was just...there, and it was a kind of sauce I don't like and a brand I don't like, and I would concoct the most imaginative meals from a nearly-bare cupboard to avoid eating it...

paintpots

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Re: Is tea time a meal?
« Reply #59 on: March 24, 2014, 10:29:40 AM »
South UK.

I don't do this every day, but a typical Sunday with family at my parents' would consist of:

8.30 Tea (just a pot while in bed)
9.00 Breakfast (croissants and cereal) - kitchen table
11.00 Elevenses -  around the kitchen table for  instant coffee and maybe a digestive biscuit
1.00 Sunday lunch - 2 courses, a roast and a pudding (dining room) moving on to..
2.00 Coffee and chocolate (drawing room)
4.00 Teatime! (drawing room) Tea, and typically fruitcake. In the summer we'd have scones with jam and cream outside.
8.00 Supper - maybe some leftover meat, cheese etc, generally pretty light.

Obviously that's quite a lot of eating for one day, but we would normally go for a decent walk at some point.

If the big meal is in the evening we'd have a light lunch of sandwiches & salad (whatever can be cobbled together from fridge) and then a hot meal in the evening. Generally one hot meal a day.

It's quite common to invite people over to tea - 4pmish, it's likely to be tea and cakes, any later and you might be getting something more substantial - always wise to clarify!
What do you have as a pudding?  What is a fruitcake?  And what kind of chocolate do you have? 

I hope that you don't mind all of the questions.

Not at all!

Pudding would be apple and blackberry crumble, apple pie (all with custard obviously), trifle. Generally something rich and fruity, we don't tend to go for chocolate puddings.

Fruitcake - a lighter more spongy version of a heavy fruitcake like the one you might make for Christmas (like this: http://www.joyofbaking.com/FruitCake.html ) . Alternatively something like soreen malt loaf with a scraping of butter on it.  This part of the day is very seasonal, so at Christmas we'd have mince pies and christmas cake, Easter we'd have hot cross buns and simnel cake etc. If it's really cold outside we might have crumpets.

Chocolate would just be dark chocolate squares/any chocolates that happen to be on hand like after eights.