Author Topic: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.  (Read 8248 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Tea Drinker

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1308
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #60 on: April 07, 2014, 12:51:49 AM »
A "random person answering the telephone" would be the friend of my parents' who was visiting and happened to be nearest the phone, so picked it up and said hello. Half an hour later, she told us that she had been chatting with someone who had called the wrong number.

OK, most of us wouldn't chat with a wrong-number caller: but the phone might plausibly be answered by a visitor to the home, who might or might not be visiting the person who the doctor's office was trying to reach. You might tell your husband what doctors you're seeing, and not want your sister- or brother-in-law to know.
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

veronaz

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1990
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #61 on: April 07, 2014, 02:52:01 PM »
Re debate about “random people answering the phone, who is/is not considered “random”, doctor’s offices and various health care professionals calling………is ‘reaching’.

The OP clearly stated what happened in her initial post.  She was not a doctor calling a patient’s home, and the man’s wife was not a random person.  I don’t see why hypotheticals are necessary in this situation.

Also, no one knows what would have happened if OP had said she was calling about the church softball league.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1916
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #62 on: April 07, 2014, 03:52:49 PM »
If the man organizing the league had such an issue with telemarketers I think the onus was on him to ensure that anyone calling him who was not a telemarketer was able to be identified as not a telemarketer. It's not on the OP to assume that the man hates telemarketers more than most people do, and uses profanity on the phone, and to introduce herself in such a way as to avoid that.

I think she did nothing wrong.

If the man didn't want people calling and asking for him, he could have:

1) not volunteered field calls about the team

2) given his number for the pamphlet but not his name, so that callers would be forced to start with "I'm calling about softball" instead of asking for his name

3) just supplied an email address/mailing address, not a phone number

4) given a fake name for the pamphlet so he'd know what they were calling about.

A guy I dated in college had to supply a phone number for an activity he was the director of. He lived in a fraternity with few phone lines and so much chaoes that men hardly ever got their phone messages. So instead, he gave his work number out. But he wanted to be able to know that they were calling about this activity instead of work, so he gave a fake name. He knew that anyone asking for this fake name was calling about the activity instead of work.

Wintergreen

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #63 on: April 23, 2014, 05:32:40 AM »
Also, not every business should identify itself first. If my doctor, lawyer, CPA, calls they don't know who is answering the phone.  They need to ask for me without identifying themselves.  I may not want my husband, sons, son's friend answering the phone to know my business.

Exactly!! If I am calling for Person A, it's really none of Person B's business who is calling. It's Person A that I need to identify myself to.  Of course, Person B may say, "May I ask who is calling?" in which case I can tell them, or not, but I don't think it's automatically their business to know. If my doctor calls, and another family member picks up the phone and the doctor says, "It's Dr. So-and-So; I'd like to speak with Raintree" then several problems can occur: nosy family members wanting to know why my doctor's been calling, worry-warts hovering and wondering if everything's OK, etc. You might be waiting for the results of some highly sensitive and private medical test.

So this guy was totally rude; if he's going to put a pamphlet out there with his name and phone number on it, he's got to be prepared that people might, you know, call with inquiries.

How often does your doctor call you at home – with or without relatives hovering and worrying in the background?

Most people can count on less than half of one hand how many times their doctor has called them.

As far as the identity of the caller not being the business of the person answering the phone, the fact is that (in business) many employees are instructed to get the name of the caller before putting the call thru.  It’s part of their job.  Many are also instructed to find out what the call is concerning.

That aside, this thread was not initially about a call to a business – it’s about a call to someone’s home.

Doctors? Far more often, at least for me - and I'm generally healthy person. I've also gotten surprise phone call from police - it was not about anything I've done, but the matter was such that I do not wish others to be familiar with it and I would have hated to explain for my family why police is trying to reach me. Even if people do call mainly for my mobile these days, my fiance or friend/relative might answer that too. Especially if I have my hands full or I am in bad place, like I answer sometimes for their phones.

Wintergreen

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #64 on: April 23, 2014, 05:48:07 AM »
Re debate about “random people answering the phone, who is/is not considered “random”, doctor’s offices and various health care professionals calling………is ‘reaching’.

The OP clearly stated what happened in her initial post.  She was not a doctor calling a patient’s home, and the man’s wife was not a random person.  I don’t see why hypotheticals are necessary in this situation.

Also, no one knows what would have happened if OP had said she was calling about the church softball league.

They are necessary because hypotheticals are all that callers know. Caller does not know if the person answering is the person she was trying to reach or a burglar. You (general) don't know that woman answering would be the wife. You know nothing, so you must prepare for the worst, not the best scenario. Also, I do think that religious matters are quite personal. What church if any I would be attending is information I would not want to be published. My spiritual preferences are my own, and not information even my relatives need to know. And here comes the thing what I was trying to say in post way back. It is obvious that many think telling "he is attending church X and runs softball team" is ok to tell, for other people it might not be okay information. For me, telling that I run softball team would be fine, but telling somebody I attend church X would not be. That is why it is not up to the caller to decide what information can be enclosed to total stranger.

Aquamarine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1688
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2014, 05:14:24 PM »
People feel super harassed regarding phone calls from strangers anymore.  I would have introduced myself by saying "Hi, I'm calling about the softball league, my name is__________.  That immediately lets them knows it's not a telemarketer and still allows you to introduce yourself.  Most telemarketer calls start out "Hi, my name is_______" which instantly puts me on alert and which is why I now say why I'm calling before giving my name.

The man was rude to swear at you like he did but it's his house and he can answer the phone anyway he chooses to.  The pastor needs to know this is the response people will be greeted with when they call this person.  FYI I wouldn't have gone back either.
Always be polite, even to nasty people. Not because they are nice, but because you are.

veronaz

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1990
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2014, 05:36:21 PM »
Quote
Caller does not know if the person answering is the person she was trying to reach or a burglar.

 ;D

I doubt that many burglars take time to answer phone calls for their victims.

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1916
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2014, 06:27:17 PM »
Quote
Caller does not know if the person answering is the person she was trying to reach or a burglar.

 ;D

I doubt that many burglars take time to answer phone calls for their victims.

I've had it happen!

I had left my car for a short while at my apartment complex. It was locked, but as I planned to return in a few minutes, I just hid my possessions (like my cell phone) under the seat. I did have my wallet with me but left everything else like my sunglasses and a camera.

Some jerk(s) broke my passenger window and stole everything in my car, including my cell phone. When my parents called me later, the thief answered my phone!!!!

Softly Spoken

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 578
  • "I am a hawk on a cliff..."
Re: Not every cold call is a telemarketer.
« Reply #68 on: June 25, 2014, 05:19:01 PM »
The man in the OP was rude and the pastor should have been told.

Also, not every business should identify itself first. If my doctor, lawyer, CPA, calls they don't know who is answering the phone.  They need to ask for me without identifying themselves.  I may not want my husband, sons, son's friend answering the phone to know my business.

That is a great point. I also think caller i.d. (or maybe people assuming everyone has it) may have changed how we handle phone calls.
Thinking back on it, I realize that my doctor's office has always asked to speak to me first, before identifying themselves. But then so do many telemarketers. I recognize my doc's # on caller id, so I don't ask who is calling because I know, so I just tell them it's me and we get on with things. If I don't recognize the number, I ask who is calling and if it's some scam or whatever I tell them "she" (i.e. me) isn't available.
I called my friend the other day and when she answered I said "Hello, Friend? This is Softly." She said yes she knew - I didn't realize her phone had caller i.d. We had a laugh about it.
Family and friends know my voice, and jump right into the conversation after I say "Hello?" with a "Hey Softly how's it going?" etc. I can usually in turn recognize their voice (could do that before caller i.d.) and we just talk - no introductions needed.
However, barring special situations I think you can never assume a) that when calling you will get the person you are looking for, or b) that the person either calling or answering knows who you are.
So if you are calling a stranger, it's good to both introduce yourself and confirm who they are - in whatever order feels appropriate. Whether it's "hi this is myname may I speak to so and so?" or "Hi can I speak to so and so? This is myname." I get including your business affiliation as necessary, but I don't think it's prudent or polite to state your actual business/reason for calling unless asked directly or until after you've confirmed you are talking to the right person.

I don't think it is rude to ask who you are calling/speaking to or if soandso is there, especially if it is an unfamiliar number/first time calling, because you could have easily misread or misdialed etc.
"... for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so."
-William Shakespeare

"We find comfort among those who agree with us - growth among those who don't."  ~Frank A. Clark