Author Topic: "Stealing" a Baby Name  (Read 33935 times)

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blarg314

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #150 on: April 30, 2014, 02:02:54 AM »

I dunno, it's kind of sweet... in a warped way.   If it's a family tradition that's important to them, it's nice that she is considerate of that rather than saying "Too bad you snooze you lose".   On the other hand, changing her son's name if a future John shows up, by which point John might already be well into school-aged, is definitely a little... odd.    ;D

I think I'd be more than a bit taken aback to be sitting down with my family boyfriend's early in the dating process and have them discuss how they had decided what I would be naming the children I would be having with him.

A desire to follow a family naming system is definitely something that should be discussed well before marrying or having children, but that's something the potential fiance should be bringing up - "Yes, I want to have kids too. It's important to me that we follow my family's tradition of naming the firstborn son John - how do you feel about that?" is a good start.

I do feel very sorry for little Fake John, who is going to be told at some point that his new cousin is the Real John, and he can't use the name anymore because he's not the firstborn son of the firstborn son.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #151 on: April 30, 2014, 08:34:28 AM »
DH had a name for a son picked out before we even started dating.  He wanted to name a son for his grandfather and his dad, but use their middle names.  As I didn't have a problem with either name, I went along with it.

I had to laugh a few years ago, as my oldest was born in '01 and this girl asked if he was named after Edward from Twilight. She was disappointed when I said no, as he was born before the series came out and told her he was named for a great grandfather who passed away right as DH and I had started dating. (like a week after, even)

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nayberry

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #152 on: April 30, 2014, 09:29:45 AM »

OP, I'm just repeating others when I say the most amusing thing about this is that YOU first said you were thinking of using the name. It's like you're holding a candy bar, she yanks it from your hand, then insists you can't touch HER candy!  :o

Charlotte is a beautiful name. I have an Aunt (in her 60s) and a SIL (in her 40s) with that name; it seems to be a timeless name without having been over-used.

When it comes to name-stealing, of course I think it isn't even possible, but I completely appreciate the claim if the name is really unusual.

My son is 9 and I didn't know anyone at all with his name when he was born ("Levi", which may be uncommon, but not at all unusual). I was very happy about that. Now his name is growing steadily in popularity and I'm a bit disappointed because I liked it being unique. I never would have tried to prevent a loved-one from using it on their own child, though!

I wonder how a person would feel if someone had a unique naming approach that someone 'stole' rather than the specific name (like "I'm going to name all my daughters after Disney princesses... Tianna, Ariel, and Belle), then someone else, like her SIL, comes along and names her kids Jasmine and Aurora. I can imagine some people getting really territorial!

That is my 12 year old son's name!  We chose it for Biblical reasons (he was almost 'Noah').

Ah yes, the rise of the old testament names over the past decade....  my son has one too (neither Levi or Noah but similar), but we were aware that it's on the increase prior to selecting it.  Given our other name choices were all in the top 25 I was just glad this one was only top 100, and a fairly recent entry!   

myself and my siblings are old testament names, but thats because they liked the names and the fact it tied in was happy coincidence.

ot slightly, the phrase "old testament names" makes me think of seven brides for seven brothers

MommyPenguin

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #153 on: April 30, 2014, 11:14:30 AM »
My husband and I each had a favorite girl name that we wanted to use if we had any girls.  It worked out really well that... we both had the *same* favorite girl name.

Of course, now that we have four girls, it might have been nice if one of us had had another favorite, as we're running out of ideas!

I have a friend who has three sons.  Noah, Joshua, and... Colin.  It amuses me, because Colin sort of stands out as being the non-Biblical name.

Of course, I have another friend who has three girls: Madison, Savannah, and Dakota.  I teased her that if she has any more, she'll have to have "Cheyenne."  She laughed and said she and her husband had joked about the same thing... and even needing to use the same name!  (Yes, I know there are other options: Carolina, Georgia, Augusta, etc.)

CharlieBraun

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #154 on: April 30, 2014, 07:04:36 PM »
I was dating a guy who I will call "John."  Because that was his name.

His dad was John.  And his grandfather.  And great grandfather.  And...and...and...back back back.

His sister had two children - she had named her first son "John" and her second son "Not John."  Or Robert.  Or Seth. 

When he and I were nowhere near to getting engaged - in fact, it was like the second time I met her - she solemnly assured me that I had her permission to name my son John, after that future mythical son's presumed father (her brother), and that she'd only named her son John because:

1) her brother had been so long unmarried that the family suspected he might be gay[/color], and that
2) her son's name was really just a" placeholder"; if her brother did marry and have a "real" son to be named John. they'd start using her son's middle name and leave "John" to the "Real John".

My then boyfriend listened to all of this, nodding approvingly.  It had evidently been discussed.

I can't believe I dated him as long as I did.

That's quite horrifying. A person's name is one of the most fundamental things about them. To think they can suddenly just starting calling the boy by something else is beyond any normalcy that I can grasp. And how horrible for the boy to be treated as though he's less worthy than his cousin (presumably) because he's the child of the daughter, not the son. And thinking that because he wasn't married yet he must be gay?  Seriously?  That family sounds really screwed up.

Even though I would never in a million years choose my child's name simply because it's family tradition (it would instantly go to the bottom of my name list), I don't see anything wrong with two cousins having the same first name.

You nailed it.

In my husband's family, there are many first cousins with the same first name.  We use modifiers.  Big Johnny, Little Johnny.  Paul, Paulie, PaulGee, PaulDee.

Interestingly, Big Johnny is called that because he was the first of the cousins with that name - he's 5'5".  Little Johnny is 6', even.


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eport

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #155 on: May 01, 2014, 09:49:22 AM »
I was dating a guy who I will call "John."  Because that was his name.

His dad was John.  And his grandfather.  And great grandfather.  And...and...and...back back back.

His sister had two children - she had named her first son "John" and her second son "Not John."  Or Robert.  Or Seth. 

When he and I were nowhere near to getting engaged - in fact, it was like the second time I met her - she solemnly assured me that I had her permission to name my son John, after that future mythical son's presumed father (her brother), and that she'd only named her son John because:

1) her brother had been so long unmarried that the family suspected he might be gay[/color], and that
2) her son's name was really just a" placeholder"; if her brother did marry and have a "real" son to be named John. they'd start using her son's middle name and leave "John" to the "Real John".

My then boyfriend listened to all of this, nodding approvingly.  It had evidently been discussed.

I can't believe I dated him as long as I did.

That's quite horrifying. A person's name is one of the most fundamental things about them. To think they can suddenly just starting calling the boy by something else is beyond any normalcy that I can grasp. And how horrible for the boy to be treated as though he's less worthy than his cousin (presumably) because he's the child of the daughter, not the son. And thinking that because he wasn't married yet he must be gay?  Seriously?  That family sounds really screwed up.

Even though I would never in a million years choose my child's name simply because it's family tradition (it would instantly go to the bottom of my name list), I don't see anything wrong with two cousins having the same first name.

You nailed it.

In my husband's family, there are many first cousins with the same first name.  We use modifiers.  Big Johnny, Little Johnny.  Paul, Paulie, PaulGee, PaulDee.

Interestingly, Big Johnny is called that because he was the first of the cousins with that name - he's 5'5".  Little Johnny is 6', even.

One of my dad's cousins is Baby Harry as his dad was Harry. Baby Harry is now an adult and in his 60s-he's still Baby Harry (never Harry).

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #156 on: May 01, 2014, 08:16:33 PM »
I've known people with naming traditions. With one, all the sons had to have the name William as a first or middle name.  In another, all boys had to have the first name of Charles.   Mostly the sons born into these families end up being called by their middle names.

I considered naming one of my boys Paul for my grandfather and an uncle I am close to but am glad I chose not to as there are really enough Pauls in the family as it is.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

amandaelizabeth

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #157 on: May 01, 2014, 11:08:49 PM »
We are sitting here in the office, trying to maker Aaron sound like Erin.  It  must be an accent thing.

Aaron sounds like air ron,
erin sound like err in


jedikaiti

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #158 on: May 01, 2014, 11:14:21 PM »
If I'm not thinking about it, I will tend to pronounce both as Air-In. Kind of a blend of two, I guess. :-)
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Jones

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #159 on: May 01, 2014, 11:31:03 PM »
If I'm not thinking about it, I will tend to pronounce both as Air-In. Kind of a blend of two, I guess. :-)

That's how they are both pronounced in my area.

baglady

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #160 on: May 01, 2014, 11:35:47 PM »
If I'm not thinking about it, I will tend to pronounce both as Air-In. Kind of a blend of two, I guess. :-)

I'm friends with a family that has a son named Aaron and an unofficial foster daughter (long story) named Erin. They are known as Aaron Boy and Erin Girl, or just "Boy" and "Girl." Since they are both well into their 20s now, I've taken to calling the latter "Erin Woman."

I hear the difference between the pronunciations of Aaron and Erin, but I hear absolutely no difference between Dawn and Don. I've never met a family that had one of each of those, however.

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amandaelizabeth

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #161 on: May 01, 2014, 11:38:19 PM »
Again very different here
Dawn. Sounds like door nn
Don sounds like son but with a d

One Fish, Two Fish

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #162 on: May 02, 2014, 07:07:45 AM »
I'm from South Carolina.  Don and Dawn sound the same.  Aaron and Erin sound the same, too.  I just asked my Utahan husband, and we said the exactly same thing.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #163 on: May 02, 2014, 07:49:28 AM »
I'm from South Carolina.  Don and Dawn sound the same.  Aaron and Erin sound the same, too.  I just asked my Utahan husband, and we said the exactly same thing.

From Maryland, myself and I'd say the same. Don and Dawn sound the same, as do Aaron and Erin.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

acicularis

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #164 on: May 02, 2014, 08:09:35 AM »
From Maryland, myself and I'd say the same. Don and Dawn sound the same, as do Aaron and Erin.

Isn't that funny, I'm from Maryland too,  but Don and Dawn do not sound the same to me! (Don has an "ah" sound while Dawn has an "aw" sound like the word "saw"). Aaron and Erin sound the same though. It's led to many confused conversations when one of my kids is talking about someone from school and I think she's talking about Erin when she means Aaron, and vice versa.