Author Topic: "Stealing" a Baby Name  (Read 33861 times)

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Ceallach

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #180 on: May 04, 2014, 03:56:20 AM »
To my (Australian) ear, Aaron and Erin, and Don and Dawn sound completely different.

But then I tried saying them with an American accent, and yeah, I can see how they'd sound the same.

This has been a constant source of confusion for me for years (NZer/Aus here).   There are a fair few "Aaron"s in US shows and movies, and I always think "Erin" is a strange name for a girl, forgetting the accent difference.   It makes it fairly confusing when I see character names written down.  "Aaron Hotchner", who's that??   

To add to the confusion, the first time I noticed it was way back when the movie "Bring it On" came out, and the character Aaron (lead character's boyfriend) was a male cheerleader who got some subtle mockery and hints about being effeminate, so that combined with the fact I thought he was called "Erin" confused me.  I thought it was a bit blatant and heavy handed writing, giving him a girls name and having him participate in a "girls" sport!    I wasn't sure at first if they were hinting he was actually a girl! 

I have had a few more US friends since then so I'm a little better at hearing the accent differnce, it still catches me out sometimes though.
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Corvid

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #181 on: May 04, 2014, 09:14:23 AM »
Erin = Eh rin.
Aaron = AIR on.

And my sister wouldn't have it any other way!

Quote
I've mentioned before, I wince at Caitlin pronounced Kate-Lynn, because where I come from it's Kathleen, or possibly Cashlin. I tell myself it's different other places. I don't know why that one annoys me, when other name variants don't.

Yeah, that's probably because someone READ the name "Caitlin" somewhere without hearing the actual pronunciation and then it became a name of it's own (with many variations of the spelling).

PastryGoddess

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #182 on: May 04, 2014, 03:07:47 PM »
I know a few Caitlin's and it's pronounced kate-lynn.  The name has been around for a while, I'm 30.  I don't think it's going anywhere. In fact that was my mother's second choice of names for me. 

I'm in the US. 

Jones

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #183 on: May 04, 2014, 04:11:32 PM »
Also in the US, and all "Caitlins" whom I have met pronounced it "Kate-lynn".

Corvid

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #184 on: May 04, 2014, 07:26:09 PM »
Sure, in the U.S. it's pronounced Kate-Lynn, but it's originally an Irish name and that's not how the Irish pronounce it.  It's as if Siobhan became popular in the United States pronounced as See-oh-ban instead of Sheh-vohn.

It may have been around a while now but I'm 54 and didn't start hearing it until some point in the 80s and I'm willing to bet there's not a long history of Caitlins (as Kate-Lynn) in the U.S.  It's a moot point, though.  I agree it isn't going anywhere and it is EVERYWHERE.  It's like the 80s/90s version of Debbie or Susan.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2014, 07:30:08 PM by Corvid »

Elisabunny

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #185 on: May 04, 2014, 07:32:12 PM »
In the last few months, our congregation has welcomed two new babies named Talon.  No word of any feuds yet.  ;)
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JenJay

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #186 on: May 04, 2014, 07:37:34 PM »
Erin = Eh rin.
Aaron = AIR on.

And my sister wouldn't have it any other way!

Quote
I've mentioned before, I wince at Caitlin pronounced Kate-Lynn, because where I come from it's Kathleen, or possibly Cashlin. I tell myself it's different other places. I don't know why that one annoys me, when other name variants don't.

Yeah, that's probably because someone READ the name "Caitlin" somewhere without hearing the actual pronunciation and then it became a name of it's own (with many variations of the spelling).

DD met a girl in school named "Aisling". When DD pronounced it "Ash-Lynn", how she'd heard it several times, the girl sneered at her "It's A(like the letter)s-ling!" Really nasty, like DD was stupid. Hey, you can pronounce your own name however you choose but don't treat people badly for knowing the original pronunciation and not assuming you went another way.

MommyPenguin

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #187 on: May 04, 2014, 08:34:46 PM »
I heard somebody in a fast food place call her daughter Aisling.  Ayz-ling.  I chuckled to myself.

I know how to pronounce Siobhan (we actually considered using it for a middle name for one of our kids), and I *know* how to pronounce Caitlin the Irish way, but at this point it's so long been used in America sounding like "Kate-lynn" that I would automatically assume that's the pronunciation, and I would never use it for a kid intending it to be pronounced like Kathleen or Katleen because everybody would get it wrong.  Would be different if I lived in Ireland.  My dad's family is Irish, but they all have names that are also common American names, nothing uncommonly pronounced.

My church nursery used to have a whole slew of "-ayden" names at one point.  I remember Jaden, Zaden, and Brayden.  There may have also been an Aiden or two, but I don't remember all of them anymore.  I think there were about 5 of them, though, out of maybe 7 boys total.  This was probably about 5 years ago, when the craze was just starting to become noticeable.

PastryGoddess

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #188 on: May 04, 2014, 08:38:44 PM »
Sure, in the U.S. it's pronounced Kate-Lynn, but it's originally an Irish name and that's not how the Irish pronounce it.  It's as if Siobhan became popular in the United States pronounced as See-oh-ban instead of Sheh-vohn.

It may have been around a while now but I'm 54 and didn't start hearing it until some point in the 80s and I'm willing to bet there's not a long history of Caitlins (as Kate-Lynn) in the U.S.  It's a moot point, though.  I agree it isn't going anywhere and it is EVERYWHERE.  It's like the 80s/90s version of Debbie or Susan.

That's about right.  I was born in the 80's and most of the people I know with that name were too. 

JenJay

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #189 on: May 04, 2014, 08:41:25 PM »
I heard somebody in a fast food place call her daughter Aisling.  Ayz-ling.  I chuckled to myself.

Yes, that's how this girl scolded DD, with a big emphasis on the "ling". I was trying to think how to explain it, the "y" is perfect.

Ceallach

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #190 on: May 04, 2014, 09:34:25 PM »
I never realised Caitlin was irish and had a different original pronunciation - learn something new everyday hey!   Interesting how that name with it's changed pronunciation has become so common, whereas other irish names have retained their original pronunciation.   Maybe because Caitlin does look so "normal" and easy to pronounce it never occurred to people it wasn't meant to be that way, whereas some other names, such as Siobhan, never look quite "right" e.g. See-Obb-Harn doesn't sound like a "normal" name so even pronounced phonetically it's unlikely to be mutated so frequently.   

I've seen Aisling written and alway assumed it was pronounced "ailing" for some reason, although I've read a few times online that it's "Ash-lin" so do know what's technically correct.

It does make it hard for us to be super judgey about you-neek spelling of names though, when people see that in other countries the pronunciation rules differ so much from ours, it's easy to see why they then think they can then do whatever they think makes sense.   Still drives me batty when somebody actually says "We're calling her Mila but pronouncing it Miller!"  because I wonder why they could't just add an extra "L" and save themselves a lot of hassle.
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sammycat

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #191 on: May 04, 2014, 09:44:23 PM »
I never realised Caitlin was irish and had a different original pronunciation - learn something new everyday hey!   Interesting how that name with it's changed pronunciation has become so common, whereas other irish names have retained their original pronunciation.   Maybe because Caitlin does look so "normal" and easy to pronounce it never occurred to people it wasn't meant to be that way, whereas some other names, such as Siobhan, never look quite "right" e.g. See-Obb-Harn doesn't sound like a "normal" name so even pronounced phonetically it's unlikely to be mutated so frequently.   

POD.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #192 on: May 04, 2014, 11:15:31 PM »
I never realised Caitlin was irish and had a different original pronunciation - learn something new everyday hey!   Interesting how that name with it's changed pronunciation has become so common, whereas other irish names have retained their original pronunciation.   Maybe because Caitlin does look so "normal" and easy to pronounce it never occurred to people it wasn't meant to be that way, whereas some other names, such as Siobhan, never look quite "right" e.g. See-Obb-Harn doesn't sound like a "normal" name so even pronounced phonetically it's unlikely to be mutated so frequently.   

POD.

Same here I always thought Caitlyn was pronounced "Kate-lynn".

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #193 on: May 05, 2014, 04:31:07 AM »
I never realised Caitlin was irish and had a different original pronunciation - learn something new everyday hey!   Interesting how that name with it's changed pronunciation has become so common, whereas other irish names have retained their original pronunciation.   Maybe because Caitlin does look so "normal" and easy to pronounce it never occurred to people it wasn't meant to be that way, whereas some other names, such as Siobhan, never look quite "right" e.g. See-Obb-Harn doesn't sound like a "normal" name so even pronounced phonetically it's unlikely to be mutated so frequently.   


Same here I always thought Caitlyn was pronounced "Kate-lynn".

Well, as Corvid said upthread, since about the 80s, Kate-Lynn seems to have taken over, and Kathleen seems to be out of favour in any spelling. Oddly, this was being discussed recently in the UK press with the impending centenary of the birth of Dylan Thomas - it was being pointed out that commentators were referring to his wife as Kate-Lynn whereas she pronounced it Kathleen.

It was also being mentioned that Thomas himself deliberately shifted the pronunciation of his name towards the anglicised Dillon and away from the Welsh Dullan that he had used as a child.

I imagine that my irritation at Kate-Lynn  -  I didn't say it was reasonable,  just that it annoys me  -  was shared previously by some people over the shifts of Evelyn, Sidney, Valentine etc from male to female.

When the Younger Chick was born,  my parents were concerned that we had given him the name of a cartoon character of their youth,  and weren't we worried that he would be teased about it? We had to point out that nobody under 40 had ever heard of that cartoon. Times change (she said with stunning lack of originality.)

If you want a name well provided with traps for the unwary, try Bridget. Brid is a variant in its own right, not just a contraction. It may be pronounced as in bridge, or bride, or breed, or breege, or breesh. Bride, also a name in its own right, may be spelled Bride or Brid, and pronounced with or without the final e. Bridie may be a pet name for Bride or Brid or Bridget, or it may be how she says Bride. Bridget pronounced the way you would expect can be spelled Brigid, or Brighid...

Ceallach

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #194 on: May 05, 2014, 04:35:28 AM »
I never realised Caitlin was irish and had a different original pronunciation - learn something new everyday hey!   Interesting how that name with it's changed pronunciation has become so common, whereas other irish names have retained their original pronunciation.   Maybe because Caitlin does look so "normal" and easy to pronounce it never occurred to people it wasn't meant to be that way, whereas some other names, such as Siobhan, never look quite "right" e.g. See-Obb-Harn doesn't sound like a "normal" name so even pronounced phonetically it's unlikely to be mutated so frequently.   


Same here I always thought Caitlyn was pronounced "Kate-lynn".

Well, as Corvid said upthread, since about the 80s, Kate-Lynn seems to have taken over, and Kathleen seems to be out of favour in any spelling. Oddly, this was being discussed recently in the UK press with the impending centenary of the birth of Dylan Thomas - it was being pointed out that commentators were referring to his wife as Kate-Lynn whereas she pronounced it Kathleen.

It was also being mentioned that Thomas himself deliberately shifted the pronunciation of his name towards the anglicised Dillon and away from the Welsh Dullan that he had used as a child.

I imagine that my irritation at Kate-Lynn  -  I didn't say it was reasonable,  just that it annoys me  -  was shared previously by some people over the shifts of Evelyn, Sidney, Valentine etc from male to female.

When the Younger Chick was born,  my parents were concerned that we had given him the name of a cartoon character of their youth,  and weren't we worried that he would be teased about it? We had to point out that nobody under 40 had ever heard of that cartoon. Times change (she said with stunning lack of originality.)

If you want a name well provided with traps for the unwary, try Bridget. Brid is a variant in its own right, not just a contraction. It may be pronounced as in bridge, or bride, or breed, or breege, or breesh. Bride, also a name in its own right, may be spelled Bride or Brid, and pronounced with or without the final e. Bridie may be a pet name for Bride or Brid or Bridget, or it may be how she says Bride. Bridget pronounced the way you would expect can be spelled Brigid, or Brighid...

And don't forget "Bridgette" which some pronounce the french way, others pronounce Bridget.   
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