Author Topic: "Stealing" a Baby Name  (Read 34647 times)

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mrs_deb

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #120 on: April 25, 2014, 05:32:16 PM »

The only real "baby name stealing" story I ever heard was from a woman I knew on a forum.  She was pregnant with a girl and was telling all and sundry that they were going to name the baby something along the lines of Ehrynne.  (Not exactly that, but close enough.)  A normal name when pronounced, but with a totally funky spelling.

A pregnant woman she knew IRL had her baby girl first and named her...Ehrynne.

She was livid.  We heard about that for AGES.  Can't say I blame her, though.

(She ended up naming her baby Madysynne or something like that.)

Is that meant to be pronounced as Erin? It took me a while to work that out (if so). I never understand why people take perfectly normal and nice names and give them such a weird spelling. Frankly, 'Ehrynne' just looks ridiculous, as does Madysynne.


Yes, Ehrynne was supposed to be pronounced Erin.  And Madysynne was pronounced "Madison".  (Don't quote me - I'm not positive that these were the exact spellings.)  She just wanted a yooneek way to spell it.  She already had a little boy, and for the life of me I cannot remember what his name was.  It was unusual, but I don't remember it being a really weird spelling.

That said, apparently none of you were on that forum all those years ago because I was afraid someone would write, "Oh my gosh!  You're talking about <woman's name>, aren't you?!" :-)

Ceallach

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #121 on: April 26, 2014, 05:33:07 AM »
I was thinking about this further, and realised how much truth there is to the name cycles.    It's not that I don't like some of the "older" names or that I think they sound "old" - I just don't want my child named after my mother, or my friend's mother, or that boss I had at that job I hated, or DH's Aunty.     So names that were common in previous generations I'm more likely to have encountered in my life already and possibly have negative connotations from.    Actually, there is one girls name I *loved* for years until I met DH who was freshly out of a serious relationship with a horrible woman who had that name.   There is no way he would ever consider it for his child.

So I think the cycles are partly about that too.   Although I don't like many of the currently popular baby names, I can't say I have any particular negative connotations with them because most of them I just don't know anybody with!   I've never met an adult Madison, for example.  So it's more likely DH and I would pick a name from the "current" cycle than a name that was popular in the past 20-50 years and is in use by a relative or coworker who we might not want to have that association with.      Although as names diversify more I wonder if this will become less of a problem over time.    (Then of course there are the names that are *always* popular, because even if I've met one Sarah I hate, I've also met 5 I like, so it's fine either way!)   
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HoneyBee42

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #122 on: April 26, 2014, 08:25:15 AM »
Actually, according to the Name Voyager at BabyNameWizard.com, Lillian *is* making a comeback. It dropped a lot in the 1920s to almost nothing in the 1950 and 1970s. In 1990s it started rising, and it's still on an upward trend.

I wonder if Gertrude will *ever* come back. Or Mabel. They are *nowhere*.

As soon as someone mentioned 'Lillian' I knew I'd be commenting. At the very least I can see it becoming very popular for babies of people in my age range (20's right now). After all, Lillian from Rugrats. Which premiered in 1991, so it also possibly inspired the names of some younger sisters.

I would think the surge in Lily/Lilly might be Harry Potter related.

And somewhere I have a book on baby names that wasn't the typical alphabetical "here's the definition", but put them in lists according to categories (like what sort of image the name conjures up) and also a list of some of the more popular names in a given decade.  Anyway, one of the chapters was the 100 year cycle, and that some names do frequently come back.  (That was Beyond Jennifer and Jason, although it's been re-written a couple of times since.


cutejellybeen

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #123 on: April 27, 2014, 08:41:27 AM »
Hubby and I are trying to come up with a baby name for our daughter that isn't in the top 10. its hard as all the names I've loved for years are now very trendy.

We joke that we will just name the baby Jennifer. I'm a Jennifer as is Hubby's twin sister. So the current Joke is that baby will be Jennifer Last Name the third.  (SIL was not thrilled that I was taking "her" name when I married - I wonder how she'd feel about having a third one around? lol)

My BFF and I both love a lot of the same names. While I wouldnt purposely choose the same name, we've both agreed that if we had one *this is it* name we would just each call our baby the name we love - they would have different middle and last names after all.



blarg314

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #124 on: April 27, 2014, 09:26:04 PM »

Re Madison - I believe the popularity of that name came from the movie "Splash" (the character reads it off a Madison Avenue sign).  Splash came out in 1984, so older Madisons would be under 30.

Browyn

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #125 on: April 28, 2014, 08:55:21 AM »
When we were planning to have kids we considered Victoria as our "girl" name, after an uncle who had recently passed away.  Then DH cousin (Uncle's daughter) adopted and used the name.  Rather than use the same name we switched to our backup, Rebecca.

We ended up having a boy anyway so not an issue.

wolfie

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #126 on: April 28, 2014, 02:46:54 PM »
There are also, according to the Baby Name Wizard, cycles.  Names of your mother's generation (for me, Linda, Sue, Debby, Barbara) all sound like your mother-in-law's name, and they make you think of a 50-year-old woman.  Names of your grandmother's generation (for me, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, Shirley) all sound like old lady names.

But you probably never knew your great-grandmother, or at least very little, and not many other people of your great-grandmother's generation.  You may have heard stories about her, and stories from when she was a little girl.  You may romanticize her generation, and earlier than that.  So the names of that generation and earlier (for me, Ruth, Virginia, Elizabeth, Evelyn) don't have as much baggage to them.

Of course, there are names that we like and names that we don't like from those generations, because there are other trends that drive us.  For instance, there's a current trend towards boys' names ending in -n.  Just like Carotte said that in France there's a trend towards boys' names ending in -o.

Girls' names with two syllables (or sometimes three) ending with -a are really popular right now.  Ava, Sophia, Olivia, etc.  Soft letters like s, ph, l, and v.  Lots of k's and m's, too.  But not as many d's, and generally flowing names.  So some women may be choosing old-fashioned, uncommon names, and then finding that Julia, or Sylvia, turns out to have three others of her name in her preschool class, because the other women are of the same generation and they are all being affected by language the same way such that they are also looking for those soft consonants and flowing names with the -a ending.

I want to see "Evelyn" make a comeback as a boy's name. Perhaps the (male) character of Evelyn Napier in Downton Abbey will make it acceptable? Fingers crossed!

In general once a name becomes a girl's name it never moves back to being a boy's name.

violinp

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #127 on: April 28, 2014, 02:52:05 PM »
There are also, according to the Baby Name Wizard, cycles.  Names of your mother's generation (for me, Linda, Sue, Debby, Barbara) all sound like your mother-in-law's name, and they make you think of a 50-year-old woman.  Names of your grandmother's generation (for me, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, Shirley) all sound like old lady names.

But you probably never knew your great-grandmother, or at least very little, and not many other people of your great-grandmother's generation.  You may have heard stories about her, and stories from when she was a little girl.  You may romanticize her generation, and earlier than that.  So the names of that generation and earlier (for me, Ruth, Virginia, Elizabeth, Evelyn) don't have as much baggage to them.

Of course, there are names that we like and names that we don't like from those generations, because there are other trends that drive us.  For instance, there's a current trend towards boys' names ending in -n.  Just like Carotte said that in France there's a trend towards boys' names ending in -o.

Girls' names with two syllables (or sometimes three) ending with -a are really popular right now.  Ava, Sophia, Olivia, etc.  Soft letters like s, ph, l, and v.  Lots of k's and m's, too.  But not as many d's, and generally flowing names.  So some women may be choosing old-fashioned, uncommon names, and then finding that Julia, or Sylvia, turns out to have three others of her name in her preschool class, because the other women are of the same generation and they are all being affected by language the same way such that they are also looking for those soft consonants and flowing names with the -a ending.

I want to see "Evelyn" make a comeback as a boy's name. Perhaps the (male) character of Evelyn Napier in Downton Abbey will make it acceptable? Fingers crossed!

In general once a name becomes a girl's name it never moves back to being a boy's name.

But Evelyn for a boy and Evelyn for a girl are pronounced differently - EE - vuh - lin for a boy and EH - vuh - lin for a girl. Sure, I wouldn't name my son Evelyn, but I wouldn't think the boy named Evelyn was a girl, because of the pronunciation.
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One Fish, Two Fish

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #128 on: April 28, 2014, 03:05:22 PM »
My 10 year old DD's nickname is Lulabelle (Lu for short).  I'm not sure why I started calling her that, but it really suits her.  We were in a store once, and I said "Lulabelle, please grab that for me." A woman and her elderly mother stopped short and gaped at me.  Elderly mother's name is Lulabelle.  :)  I did have to explain that my daughter's name is actually something else. 
I'll get there.  Eventually.

PastryGoddess

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #129 on: April 28, 2014, 03:07:57 PM »
There are also, according to the Baby Name Wizard, cycles.  Names of your mother's generation (for me, Linda, Sue, Debby, Barbara) all sound like your mother-in-law's name, and they make you think of a 50-year-old woman.  Names of your grandmother's generation (for me, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, Shirley) all sound like old lady names.

But you probably never knew your great-grandmother, or at least very little, and not many other people of your great-grandmother's generation.  You may have heard stories about her, and stories from when she was a little girl.  You may romanticize her generation, and earlier than that.  So the names of that generation and earlier (for me, Ruth, Virginia, Elizabeth, Evelyn) don't have as much baggage to them.

Of course, there are names that we like and names that we don't like from those generations, because there are other trends that drive us.  For instance, there's a current trend towards boys' names ending in -n.  Just like Carotte said that in France there's a trend towards boys' names ending in -o.

Girls' names with two syllables (or sometimes three) ending with -a are really popular right now.  Ava, Sophia, Olivia, etc.  Soft letters like s, ph, l, and v.  Lots of k's and m's, too.  But not as many d's, and generally flowing names.  So some women may be choosing old-fashioned, uncommon names, and then finding that Julia, or Sylvia, turns out to have three others of her name in her preschool class, because the other women are of the same generation and they are all being affected by language the same way such that they are also looking for those soft consonants and flowing names with the -a ending.

I want to see "Evelyn" make a comeback as a boy's name. Perhaps the (male) character of Evelyn Napier in Downton Abbey will make it acceptable? Fingers crossed!

In general once a name becomes a girl's name it never moves back to being a boy's name.

But Evelyn for a boy and Evelyn for a girl are pronounced differently - EE - vuh - lin for a boy and EH - vuh - lin for a girl. Sure, I wouldn't name my son Evelyn, but I wouldn't think the boy named Evelyn was a girl, because of the pronunciation.

People can't pronounce John or Sarah correctly, so how on earth are you going to make sure they pronounce Evelyn correctly based on gender. 

wolfie

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #130 on: April 28, 2014, 03:15:23 PM »
There are also, according to the Baby Name Wizard, cycles.  Names of your mother's generation (for me, Linda, Sue, Debby, Barbara) all sound like your mother-in-law's name, and they make you think of a 50-year-old woman.  Names of your grandmother's generation (for me, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, Shirley) all sound like old lady names.

But you probably never knew your great-grandmother, or at least very little, and not many other people of your great-grandmother's generation.  You may have heard stories about her, and stories from when she was a little girl.  You may romanticize her generation, and earlier than that.  So the names of that generation and earlier (for me, Ruth, Virginia, Elizabeth, Evelyn) don't have as much baggage to them.

Of course, there are names that we like and names that we don't like from those generations, because there are other trends that drive us.  For instance, there's a current trend towards boys' names ending in -n.  Just like Carotte said that in France there's a trend towards boys' names ending in -o.

Girls' names with two syllables (or sometimes three) ending with -a are really popular right now.  Ava, Sophia, Olivia, etc.  Soft letters like s, ph, l, and v.  Lots of k's and m's, too.  But not as many d's, and generally flowing names.  So some women may be choosing old-fashioned, uncommon names, and then finding that Julia, or Sylvia, turns out to have three others of her name in her preschool class, because the other women are of the same generation and they are all being affected by language the same way such that they are also looking for those soft consonants and flowing names with the -a ending.

I want to see "Evelyn" make a comeback as a boy's name. Perhaps the (male) character of Evelyn Napier in Downton Abbey will make it acceptable? Fingers crossed!

In general once a name becomes a girl's name it never moves back to being a boy's name.

But Evelyn for a boy and Evelyn for a girl are pronounced differently - EE - vuh - lin for a boy and EH - vuh - lin for a girl. Sure, I wouldn't name my son Evelyn, but I wouldn't think the boy named Evelyn was a girl, because of the pronunciation.

If I say the name Evelyn written down I would assume it is a woman and it is pronounced EH-vuh-lin. If it was a male I wouldn't know it was actually pronounced differently until he corrected me. Actually I would be very surprised if a male answered and corrected me - it would go into the "boy called sue" idea for me.

Redneck Gravy

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #131 on: April 28, 2014, 03:27:21 PM »
My brother and his best friend had wives pregnant at the same time...

Mrs BF and SIL were due about the same time and long before she ever said she was pregnant my bro & SIL had the name Justin picked out.  I worked at a print shop and we had the artwork in place to be "Just In Time" as a front cover for the announcement weeks before the expected birth.

BF's wife was expecting a girl and they had a feminine type name chosen.  Well as fate would have it Mrs. BF delivered first and surprise, surprise it was a boy... they had announcements printed elsewhere with the "Just In Time" theme.  It was the end of the friendship.

My brother and sil weren't really mad about the same name, but we were all furious about the theft of their plan for the announcement theme.  Not that "just in time" is an original idea from our family - it was that they could sneak in and rip it off and act like it had been their idea the whole time. 

Our family's thinking was that if they will stoop to steal this - what else might they feel free to take later?

   

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #132 on: April 28, 2014, 05:07:17 PM »
The only Evelyn I know is a girl who pronounces it "Ee-vuh-lin." This may be because she lives in Montreal and is being raised bilingually in English and French.

But it means that if someone refers to "my friend 'Evelyn'" and pronounces it with a long e, I won't assume their friend is male. If you need to indicate gender, use pronouns or otherwise make it explicit: "I met a man named Evelyn last week" or "my friend Evelyn said she'd come over on the weekend."
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violinp

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #133 on: April 28, 2014, 05:13:38 PM »
The only Evelyn I know is a girl who pronounces it "Ee-vuh-lin." This may be because she lives in Montreal and is being raised bilingually in English and French.

But it means that if someone refers to "my friend 'Evelyn'" and pronounces it with a long e, I won't assume their friend is male. If you need to indicate gender, use pronouns or otherwise make it explicit: "I met a man named Evelyn last week" or "my friend Evelyn said she'd come over on the weekend."

I was thinking primarily of Evelyn Waugh, the author of Brideshead Revisited, so that probably colored my perception of the name and its different pronunciations.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


MommyPenguin

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #134 on: April 28, 2014, 05:38:14 PM »
I forget if I've posted about this before, but I find the names of the Magic School Bus kids fascinating.  Arnold, Wanda, Dorothy Ann, Phoebe... all very old-fashioned names that don't really fit, especially as the look of the cars, clothes, and the date of the show all seem 90s.  Some of the kids have names that are a little less dated (Tim, Keesha, Carlos), though.

I think Ceallach has a great point, that it's not just that the names are "dated," but that you tend to know people with those names and that brings a lot of baggage.  Whereas names from dead generations just don't have as much to them.  And then, of course, newer, untried names have less baggage as well.

HoneyBee, I think you have a good point about Lily/Lilly being Harry Potter related, too.  I think it's a combination of it being the "right sort" of name along with the Harry Potter reference.  While there might be a *slight* uptick in Hermiones, Albuses, etc., I think you're more likely to see Lily, Harry, and James become more popular, because they fit the modern style.  I personally love the name Henry and would love to use it for a child.  Possibly Henry Aaron.  Called Hank.  :)  Obviously not named after Harry Potter...

Redneck Gravy, I'm curious... did the BF/wife also name their child "Justin," or did they just use the theme, when it would have been so perfect for your brother's child who was actually being named Justin?

In reference to the OP, I feel like I'm seeing Charlottes everywhere nowadays!  I wouldn't mind having a Charlotte myself.  :)  My husband prefers Lavinia, also a name from Downton Abbey.  :)