Author Topic: "Stealing" a Baby Name  (Read 33492 times)

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GrammarNerd

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #210 on: May 06, 2014, 06:39:54 PM »
My son went to school with a girl named 'Caira'.  I was talking with another mom one day about some of the kids in the class.  She mentioned a 'Sierra'.  I had no idea who that was, b/c I knew all of the kids in the class by then, so I asked.  She smirked and said 'yeah...that's how they pronounce her name, Caira.  They actually pronounce the letter 'C' instead of the sound for it, and then there's 'air' and then 'a'.' 

I've wondered over the years if this child has EVER had anyone pronounce her name right.

lowspark

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #211 on: May 30, 2014, 02:23:35 PM »
But Evelyn for a boy and Evelyn for a girl are pronounced differently - EE - vuh - lin for a boy and EH - vuh - lin for a girl. Sure, I wouldn't name my son Evelyn, but I wouldn't think the boy named Evelyn was a girl, because of the pronunciation.

The only Evelyn I know is a girl who pronounces it "Ee-vuh-lin." This may be because she lives in Montreal and is being raised bilingually in English and French.

But it means that if someone refers to "my friend 'Evelyn'" and pronounces it with a long e, I won't assume their friend is male. If you need to indicate gender, use pronouns or otherwise make it explicit: "I met a man named Evelyn last week" or "my friend Evelyn said she'd come over on the weekend."

I was thinking primarily of Evelyn Waugh, the author of Brideshead Revisited, so that probably colored my perception of the name and its different pronunciations.

I just thought of this thread the other night while watching an old movie on Netflix called, "Personal Affair". Movie was made in 1953 in the UK and there was a female character named Evelyn, pronounced with a long E.

I, too, sort of assumed long E meant male based on Evelyn Waugh. But here is a fairly old English film which contradicts that. Funny how you can get preconceived notions about something based on an anecdotal occurrence.  :D

mime

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #212 on: May 30, 2014, 03:11:14 PM »
My son went to school with a girl named 'Caira'.  I was talking with another mom one day about some of the kids in the class.  She mentioned a 'Sierra'.  I had no idea who that was, b/c I knew all of the kids in the class by then, so I asked.  She smirked and said 'yeah...that's how they pronounce her name, Caira.  They actually pronounce the letter 'C' instead of the sound for it, and then there's 'air' and then 'a'.' 

I've wondered over the years if this child has EVER had anyone pronounce her name right.

I knew of a Ciara, too, in my son's preschool. When I asked her name she responded, and I must not have heard her correctly because I repeated her name as "Sierra", and she quickly corrected me with a (very cute) 3-year old girl over-exaggerated "no-- See-AIR-ah!" I could tell that even at 3 years old, she'd had plenty of experience correcting people on how to pronounce her name.

I didn't think I'd run into this with my own son-- Anton. to me the name is very Scandinavian, and always always always pronounced "ANN-tun". Little did I know... I didn't realize that others know the name to have other origins and say "ann-TONE", "ann-TAHN", or even "ann-TWAN".

At least they still sound similar to each other.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #213 on: May 30, 2014, 03:40:40 PM »
My son went to school with a girl named 'Caira'.  I was talking with another mom one day about some of the kids in the class.  She mentioned a 'Sierra'.  I had no idea who that was, b/c I knew all of the kids in the class by then, so I asked.  She smirked and said 'yeah...that's how they pronounce her name, Caira.  They actually pronounce the letter 'C' instead of the sound for it, and then there's 'air' and then 'a'.' 

I've wondered over the years if this child has EVER had anyone pronounce her name right.

I knew of a Ciara, too, in my son's preschool. When I asked her name she responded, and I must not have heard her correctly because I repeated her name as "Sierra", and she quickly corrected me with a (very cute) 3-year old girl over-exaggerated "no-- See-AIR-ah!" I could tell that even at 3 years old, she'd had plenty of experience correcting people on how to pronounce her name.

I didn't think I'd run into this with my own son-- Anton. to me the name is very Scandinavian, and always always always pronounced "ANN-tun". Little did I know... I didn't realize that others know the name to have other origins and say "ann-TONE", "ann-TAHN", or even "ann-TWAN".

At least they still sound similar to each other.

How did you pronounce "Sierra"?  I'd pronounce it as "See-AIR-ah", as she did.

artk2002

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #214 on: May 30, 2014, 03:47:54 PM »
How did you pronounce "Sierra"?  I'd pronounce it as "See-AIR-ah", as she did.

That's how I pronounce it as well. Having lived and traveled through the Sierra Nevada mountains, I don't think I've ever heard it pronounced any other way.
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Elfmama

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #215 on: May 30, 2014, 03:58:38 PM »
My son went to school with a girl named 'Caira'.  I was talking with another mom one day about some of the kids in the class.  She mentioned a 'Sierra'.  I had no idea who that was, b/c I knew all of the kids in the class by then, so I asked.  She smirked and said 'yeah...that's how they pronounce her name, Caira.  They actually pronounce the letter 'C' instead of the sound for it, and then there's 'air' and then 'a'.' 

I've wondered over the years if this child has EVER had anyone pronounce her name right.

I knew of a Ciara, too, in my son's preschool. When I asked her name she responded, and I must not have heard her correctly because I repeated her name as "Sierra", and she quickly corrected me with a (very cute) 3-year old girl over-exaggerated "no-- See-AIR-ah!" I could tell that even at 3 years old, she'd had plenty of experience correcting people on how to pronounce her name.

I didn't think I'd run into this with my own son-- Anton. to me the name is very Scandinavian, and always always always pronounced "ANN-tun". Little did I know... I didn't realize that others know the name to have other origins and say "ann-TONE", "ann-TAHN", or even "ann-TWAN".

At least they still sound similar to each other.

How did you pronounce "Sierra"?  I'd pronounce it as "See-AIR-ah", as she did.
Me too.  "Ciara" on the other hand, I'd pronounce as See-ARE-ah.

And I hear a lot on the TV about people in this area named "ant-WON."
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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #216 on: May 30, 2014, 04:34:50 PM »
I know a Lillian born in '99. Since childhood I'd wanted to name DD Lydia but DH vetoed it on the grounds of mental association. Thanks a lot, Beetlejuice.

On names with common pronunciations but different spellings, I once encountered an "Emily" spelled Emmaleigh.

I'm Emaleigh. Its apparently french? I was told that a few times anyway. I didn't love it as a kid but it LOOKS very pretty on paper with my middle name.

Gotta spell it every time though.
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mime

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #217 on: May 30, 2014, 04:39:23 PM »
My son went to school with a girl named 'Caira'.  I was talking with another mom one day about some of the kids in the class.  She mentioned a 'Sierra'.  I had no idea who that was, b/c I knew all of the kids in the class by then, so I asked.  She smirked and said 'yeah...that's how they pronounce her name, Caira.  They actually pronounce the letter 'C' instead of the sound for it, and then there's 'air' and then 'a'.' 

I've wondered over the years if this child has EVER had anyone pronounce her name right.

I knew of a Ciara, too, in my son's preschool. When I asked her name she responded, and I must not have heard her correctly because I repeated her name as "Sierra", and she quickly corrected me with a (very cute) 3-year old girl over-exaggerated "no-- See-AIR-ah!" I could tell that even at 3 years old, she'd had plenty of experience correcting people on how to pronounce her name.

I didn't think I'd run into this with my own son-- Anton. to me the name is very Scandinavian, and always always always pronounced "ANN-tun". Little did I know... I didn't realize that others know the name to have other origins and say "ann-TONE", "ann-TAHN", or even "ann-TWAN".

At least they still sound similar to each other.

How did you pronounce "Sierra"?  I'd pronounce it as "See-AIR-ah", as she did.

Ack! I meant that she said "See-ARR-ah". Good grief, I still can't get that name right!  :P


HGolightly

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #218 on: May 30, 2014, 08:17:08 PM »
And to complicate things.....I had a friend named Ciara who pronounced it KEE-are-a

Corvid

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #219 on: May 31, 2014, 01:23:42 AM »
And now we're back to Irish names, in which "Ciara" is pronounced "Keer ah" as in Keira Knightly.   :P

Shea

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #220 on: May 31, 2014, 11:50:18 AM »
I know a Lillian born in '99. Since childhood I'd wanted to name DD Lydia but DH vetoed it on the grounds of mental association. Thanks a lot, Beetlejuice.

On names with common pronunciations but different spellings, I once encountered an "Emily" spelled Emmaleigh.

I'm Emaleigh. Its apparently french? I was told that a few times anyway. I didn't love it as a kid but it LOOKS very pretty on paper with my middle name.

Gotta spell it every time though.

Emily in French is Émilie, the "leigh" suffix doesn't exist in French.


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Tea Drinker

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #221 on: May 31, 2014, 01:34:04 PM »
I know a Lillian born in '99. Since childhood I'd wanted to name DD Lydia but DH vetoed it on the grounds of mental association. Thanks a lot, Beetlejuice.

On names with common pronunciations but different spellings, I once encountered an "Emily" spelled Emmaleigh.

I'm Emaleigh. Its apparently french? I was told that a few times anyway. I didn't love it as a kid but it LOOKS very pretty on paper with my middle name.

Gotta spell it every time though.

It doesn't look French to me. Knowing nothing about how it was chosen, I would guess that your parents started with a double name, Emma Leigh, and combined them, in the same way as people can be named either Mary Lou or Marylou.

If I just saw it on paper, I'd pronounce Emaleigh a bit differently from "Emily" (or Emilie), a schwa for the "a" rather than the short i (as in "it") of "Emily," but of course it's your name and get to decide how it's pronounced.
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z_squared82

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #222 on: June 01, 2014, 12:39:31 AM »
My friend is getting married. He and his fiancee have a name for a baby girl picked out that they really like. They have not shared this name with their families. (Olivia Clare, how pretty!)

His older brother and the brother's wife are expecting. They are not finding out the baby's gender before the birth. They name they are considering for a baby girl? Olivia Jane.

My friend said, You know what, if they have a girl and go with Olivia, I guess there will just be two Olivias b/c we're not changing our minds on how much we like it.

He has the right attitude. I don't think his SIL will feel the same way.

Allyson

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #223 on: June 01, 2014, 12:06:00 PM »
While I can see where he's coming from, I think intentionally naming your kid after an existing cousin when you think the parents of that cousin won't take it well is...maybe not the best idea. Olivia is a super common name, but still. Though in this case, since the older brother's wife is expecting *now* and the younger brother are still engaged, it might a few years and they might change their mind anyway...people often do. And if they see their niece Olivia frequently they may associate the name so much with her they don't want to use it. Hard to say...

Kimblee

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Re: "Stealing" a Baby Name
« Reply #224 on: June 01, 2014, 05:19:41 PM »
I know a Lillian born in '99. Since childhood I'd wanted to name DD Lydia but DH vetoed it on the grounds of mental association. Thanks a lot, Beetlejuice.

On names with common pronunciations but different spellings, I once encountered an "Emily" spelled Emmaleigh.

I'm Emaleigh. Its apparently french? I was told that a few times anyway. I didn't love it as a kid but it LOOKS very pretty on paper with my middle name.

Gotta spell it every time though.

Emily in French is Émilie, the "leigh" suffix doesn't exist in French.

Yeah, I kinda knew it was a crock when I was told it was French. The teacher that said it was a bit of a "know-it-all" and refused to believe that my mother started with "Emily" and tweaked. But then two other, unrelated, folks told me the same thing. Know-It-Alls share a brain wave.

The strange thing is, the name, spelled with the single "m" like mine, doesn't appear to be a singular occurrence, I found an Emaleigh born in 1846 and one in the 1930s.

And no, I was not named for the separate names "Emma" and "Lee/Leigh". If I had been, my father might have killed my mother right there in the delivery room. My mother wanted to name me Emma Lee [lastname] and my father actually told her if she did he would disappear with me and she'd never see me again alive. He agreed to the "tweaked" version of Emaleigh as long as i was given his preferred middle name. (Uh yeah, my dad kinda hated my grandmother. With good reason but dang is that a scary thing to tell your pregnant wife! And they both admitted he said it and both LAUGHED about it even after the divorce.) So I was named Emaleigh [middlename] [lastname] and called [diminutive of middle name].

Its a weird name to have among the sea of girls in our family. And I was the ONLY girl for about twelve years to have a "real" middle name (not Jo/Lee/Kay/Lynn. One of these four was every girl cousin/aunt/etc's middle name and there was a fuss raised at my parents for not "carrying it on")
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