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Author Topic: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"  (Read 36425 times)

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cattlekid

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2014, 05:33:35 PM »
Hillia,

I am glad to hear of your experience with the ACD rescue.  I had an ACD/border collie mix for thirteen years, six of which were in an apartment.  We took our dog for long walks every morning and evening and he was happier on those walks than he ever was during the times he was patrolling our backyard (we live on a corner and have quite a bit of yard for the size lot that we have). 

After the ACD passed on, we decided to go a different direction with our next dog and we looked for a beagle.  We tried the local shelters and were turned off by the extensive leading questionnaire.  I did not want to get my heart broken by being told that we were unsuitable dog owners (again, after having a dog for 13 years) and I could tell that would be the case based on the multi-page questionnaire that I was working on.

We abandoned that idea and went with a local irresponsible parent of the human variety who was well known in the beagle/hound/hunting dog communities.  We ended up with a wonderful dog who while he will never carry on his Field Champion lineage, makes a great house pet. 

Would I have loved to have adopted a beagle?  Yes!  Was I willing to prove that I was a responsible pet owner?  You bet!  Did I want to have to bend to someone else's every whim on what constituted a responsible pet owner and be willing to live by their arbitrary rules when adopting a pet?  Not so much.


Hillia

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2014, 05:41:26 PM »
We had an extensive questionnaire, and some people did get angry about it, even though it said that almost every question was open for discussion.  For example, it asked if there was a doggy door.  There are a million reasons why a responsible pet owner wouldn't have a doggy door; we just wanted to see if the adopter had thought through how to handle the dog's bathroom needs - or if they had a problem with wild animals coming in.

ladyknight1

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2014, 06:46:49 PM »
When we adopted our kitten, we noticed some of the questions asked by the SPCA. It is sad that they have to ask some of the questions, because I know it comes from experience.  :(

I have noticed some rescue organisms tend to not want to adopt their animals to the average person. I'm not sure where that comes from.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Wintergreen

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2014, 03:31:49 AM »
I encountered a similar attitude when adopting my cats. The RSPCA refused to let us adopt as we don't have a garden. "What if it needs the toilet?" the woman exclaimed, as if our neighbours (UK, but still) would be thrilled to have our cat crap in their flower bed.

We went with Cats Protection, who did believe in housecats.

Ha :D funny, around here quite large amount of people think that it's animal cruelty to let cats roam free. I tend to partly agree. It disturbs the balance of nature, also free cats are in danger from humans and cars and suchlike. But environment affects this much. And most cats don't enjoy leash, so garden does not bring that much enjoyment to a cat, compared to nearby park for example.

And yes... litter box exists.

shadowfox79

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2014, 04:24:25 AM »
I encountered a similar attitude when adopting my cats. The RSPCA refused to let us adopt as we don't have a garden. "What if it needs the toilet?" the woman exclaimed, as if our neighbours (UK, but still) would be thrilled to have our cat crap in their flower bed.

We went with Cats Protection, who did believe in housecats.

Ha :D funny, around here quite large amount of people think that it's animal cruelty to let cats roam free. I tend to partly agree. It disturbs the balance of nature, also free cats are in danger from humans and cars and suchlike. But environment affects this much. And most cats don't enjoy leash, so garden does not bring that much enjoyment to a cat, compared to nearby park for example.

And yes... litter box exists.

Here in the UK cats have a free-roaming agreement, so to speak. If they have a collar on it's assumed they're not a stray (plus we chip them, obviously). Our previous cat was mostly indoor but liked to go out occasionally - however, apparently now the RSPCA believe all cats should be fully outdoor unless they have some kind of disability.

Fortunately, Cats Protection introduced us to Dash and Spot, who are fully indoor and are quite capable of using the litter tray.

Bethalize

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2014, 07:11:26 AM »
apparently now the RSPCA believe all cats should be fully outdoor unless they have some kind of disability.

The RSPCA has come up with some funny ideas in recent years. However their website does not state that particular view: http://www.rspca.org.uk/allaboutanimals/pets/cats/environment/indoors

shadowfox79

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2014, 07:53:38 AM »
apparently now the RSPCA believe all cats should be fully outdoor unless they have some kind of disability.

The RSPCA has come up with some funny ideas in recent years. However their website does not state that particular view: http://www.rspca.org.uk/allaboutanimals/pets/cats/environment/indoors

It may have just been that particular branch. It was certainly new, since our previous cat had been indoor-only when we got him from the RSPCA.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2014, 08:30:31 AM »
I encountered a similar attitude when adopting my cats. The RSPCA refused to let us adopt as we don't have a garden. "What if it needs the toilet?" the woman exclaimed, as if our neighbours (UK, but still) would be thrilled to have our cat crap in their flower bed.

We went with Cats Protection, who did believe in housecats.

Have these people never heard of a litter box? Wow.

 ??? Exactly my thoughts!  And I think around here they prefer cats to be solely indoor cats which wasn't an issue for us.  Our area has a LOT of stray cats so the fewer animals wandering about outside the better, is probably their line of thought.

We actually lost a kitty cause he got out and we found him the next day.  He'd been so close to the house and clearly trying to get back home.  :'(  So I definitely feel cats are better off inside, especially within city limits.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

ArztWolf

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2014, 10:09:15 AM »
Apparently greyhounds are very low-energy as well. I read a story about a greyhound rescue that compared them to cats. They like to laze around in the sun a lot.

I have to wonder if these people have seen the actual size of some of the housing they are so in love/hate with?? One of the saddest things I ever saw animal-wise was a German Shepherd puppy that was tied up 24/7 in a neighbour's yard (I was a kid and couldn't do anything about it). We lived in a townhouse (row of small attached houses) back then and the yard was barely big enough for the dog to turn around in. Not to mention that it would have been much happier inside with people, or in a dog house, or even walking in the park. But hey - it was a house with a yard!

They're still stuck in the "a dog will only be happy in a house with a big yard" mindset. They also almost borderline discriminating on who they allow to adopt. They are friendlier to people with a "money" look and less so to people with young kids, older people and people of different ethnicity.  No all the employees are like this, just a few. They usually remain in the office so I don't have to deal with them.

The adopter in question was older, had a cane, but was not frail. They tried to talk him out of adopting any dog bigger then a 5lb Chi, since he could be "knocked over". He gave them a death glare over that one. I'm not even going to get into how they ignored him for several minutes to talk amongst themselves about things that had nothing to do with the adoption or how they left him alone with me (who has nothing to do with the adoption process, I was holding the leash of the dog he was interested) and disappeared into the office for ten minutes.

nuit93

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2014, 11:15:46 AM »
I encountered a similar attitude when adopting my cats. The RSPCA refused to let us adopt as we don't have a garden. "What if it needs the toilet?" the woman exclaimed, as if our neighbours (UK, but still) would be thrilled to have our cat crap in their flower bed.

We went with Cats Protection, who did believe in housecats.

Have these people never heard of a litter box? Wow.

 ??? Exactly my thoughts!  And I think around here they prefer cats to be solely indoor cats which wasn't an issue for us.  Our area has a LOT of stray cats so the fewer animals wandering about outside the better, is probably their line of thought.

We actually lost a kitty cause he got out and we found him the next day.  He'd been so close to the house and clearly trying to get back home.  :'(  So I definitely feel cats are better off inside, especially within city limits.

With as much wildlife as we have near our apartment, the cats would be in danger if we let them outside.  As in, they'd be a coyote snack within a day.  Didn't help that one of our late cats was fearless around anything large and canine.

So, strictly indoors for them.  They can watch the birdie and squirrel show from the window.

blue2000

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2014, 01:20:35 PM »
Apparently greyhounds are very low-energy as well. I read a story about a greyhound rescue that compared them to cats. They like to laze around in the sun a lot.

I have to wonder if these people have seen the actual size of some of the housing they are so in love/hate with?? One of the saddest things I ever saw animal-wise was a German Shepherd puppy that was tied up 24/7 in a neighbour's yard (I was a kid and couldn't do anything about it). We lived in a townhouse (row of small attached houses) back then and the yard was barely big enough for the dog to turn around in. Not to mention that it would have been much happier inside with people, or in a dog house, or even walking in the park. But hey - it was a house with a yard!

They're still stuck in the "a dog will only be happy in a house with a big yard" mindset. They also almost borderline discriminating on who they allow to adopt. They are friendlier to people with a "money" look and less so to people with young kids, older people and people of different ethnicity.  No all the employees are like this, just a few. They usually remain in the office so I don't have to deal with them.

The adopter in question was older, had a cane, but was not frail. They tried to talk him out of adopting any dog bigger then a 5lb Chi, since he could be "knocked over". He gave them a death glare over that one. I'm not even going to get into how they ignored him for several minutes to talk amongst themselves about things that had nothing to do with the adoption or how they left him alone with me (who has nothing to do with the adoption process, I was holding the leash of the dog he was interested) and disappeared into the office for ten minutes.

Wow... that's horribly misguided. A very small dog can be a trip hazard, a terror who will gnaw your cane, or a loving pet. So can a large one. It depends on the dog, not just the size.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

wheeitsme

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2014, 01:20:40 PM »
We had an opposite issue.  We were denied adoption by a dog rescue because we told them that the Black Lab mixes we were interested in would spend a large amount of time outside in our large fenced in yard.  We were told that unless our dog spent the majority of her time inside, we obviously wouldn't consider her a "member of the family".

We ended up getting a dog from an "oops litter" on Craigslist.  She has her own electric dog door that opens by an attachment on her collar.  Guess where she likes to spend a lot of her time? 


Sophia

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #27 on: April 02, 2014, 02:09:43 PM »
We had that same issue when adopting our dog, Cassie. The rescue group wasn't sure if she would do well without having a place to run around during the day. The funny thing is, is that after we had her for a couple of months (i.e. she had calmed down a lot) she turned into a dog that refuses to be outside without a person. Let her out by herself and she'll calmly wait until a person tells her its ok to go run around.
And on the other side of things, we had to sign an agreement that we wouldn't eat the kitten we were adopting after we moved here. Apparently it's enough of a problem that they had a separate agreement paper for us to sign as we were adopting.

Did you mean eat?

magicdomino

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #28 on: April 02, 2014, 03:47:17 PM »
We had that same issue when adopting our dog, Cassie. The rescue group wasn't sure if she would do well without having a place to run around during the day. The funny thing is, is that after we had her for a couple of months (i.e. she had calmed down a lot) she turned into a dog that refuses to be outside without a person. Let her out by herself and she'll calmly wait until a person tells her its ok to go run around.
And on the other side of things, we had to sign an agreement that we wouldn't eat the kitten we were adopting after we moved here. Apparently it's enough of a problem that they had a separate agreement paper for us to sign as we were adopting.

Did you mean eat?

Got to admit, I checked Zen's profile to see where she lived that eating kittens was a problems (doesn't say).  I understand that cats (and dogs) are eaten in some Asian cultures, but seriously?  Getting cats from the shelter to eat for dinner?   :-\

Zen

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2014, 04:39:07 PM »
Yes, I meant eat. I adopted from our local humane society (we live in Hawaii), and it was definitely an odd moment. I just shrugged and signed it. I'm certainly not planning on eating our house-pets, and I have no idea what incident prompted the need for a separate form.