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Author Topic: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"  (Read 36631 times)

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Ginger G

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #45 on: April 04, 2014, 03:25:37 PM »
My parents wanted to adopt an adult Sheltie after their elderly one passed away.  My parents are up there in age and didn't want to go through the whole puppy phase so they contacted a local Sheltie rescue group.  They almost got turned down outright because they have a swimming pool.  I remember how upset they were because there was one particular dog that seemed perfect for them.  Fortunately the agency relented and they got the dog, who has never gone near the pool in the seven years they've had her, and that dog has had the best life with my parents that any dog could ask for.

Tea Drinker

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #46 on: April 05, 2014, 11:21:29 AM »
I wonder if the "no dog should ever be in an apartment" people care, or even realize, that they are saying that blind people shouldn't live in apartments.
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

cattlekid

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2014, 06:50:40 PM »
Count me in for this mindset.  Our border collie/cattledog was 12 when he developed prostate cancer.  We did put him on medication to keep the tumor from growing more aggressively (and it helped his arthritis, which was an unexpected bonus) and we had to have him in diapers in the house.  Other than the diapers, he had a pretty good quality of life. We did that for about 7 months to get him to his 13th birthday and then the tumor just got away from us and we had to put him to sleep as well.   There was no way that I was going to put a 12 year old dog through surgery and/or chemo. 

If I had an elderly dog that was diagnosed with cancer I would most likely euthanize the animal. ( depending on the circumstances ).  That apprently made me a cruel animal hater in their opinion.
That was why we put Tasha to sleep when she developed liver cancer.  She was 13; average lifespan for a husky is 12-15 years. Yes, we could have laid out thousands of dollars for chemo, but she was in severe pain.  Chemo isn't an instant cure-all, and it causes its own problems.  We were not willing to put her through MORE pain on the off-chance that she could live for 2 more years.

alkira6

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2014, 07:18:52 PM »
Our 10 year old lab/shepherd mix has a slow growth tumor.  He is on meds and when those don't work he is getting an awesome walk, a steak dinner, and a quiet home visit from the vet.  This is a dog who we have spent much money previously on surgeries and medical attention for a hernia, two busted knees, an eye surgery, and more.  Yet we are cruel to not put him through another surgery for a tumor that has invaded various organs. (not much, but enough to make the surgery a 70/30 against getting it all).

POF

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2014, 08:08:59 PM »
We have acquaintenances / neighbors who always made nasty little digs about buying a dog at a pet store.... ( OK - I never really intended to do that ... but it happened ).

So we had our non pedigree - golden retriever out for a long walk yesterday and came upon a family with a little girl about 2 who had some development issues.  She was being carried - but wanted to see the doggie.  Duckie was so sweet with her and let her touch her and hug etc.  She is really the gentlest. most loving dog I've ever had.   

kherbert05

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #50 on: April 07, 2014, 06:48:26 PM »
We had an extensive questionnaire, and some people did get angry about it, even though it said that almost every question was open for discussion.  For example, it asked if there was a doggy door.  There are a million reasons why a responsible pet owner wouldn't have a doggy door; we just wanted to see if the adopter had thought through how to handle the dog's bathroom needs - or if they had a problem with wild animals coming in.
When I adopted Abby and Andi - the rescue specifically said that having a doggy door was a bad idea because they would drive the neighbors nuts barking all day.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

POF

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #51 on: April 07, 2014, 06:52:52 PM »
Our neighbors cat brought a half dead muskrat in through the doggie door.  It was quite exciting... animal control came over and we all laughed so hard we could hardly get the darned thing.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2014, 06:55:15 PM »
I know someone who had a skunk come in through the doggie door.  And right up into the bedroom, by the two Irish wolfhounds and the skunk was then startled when Dave came to and sat up in bed.

He went into work the next day and his staff told him to go home, he smelled so bad.  His boss bought a stuffed Pepe Le Pew doll and sent it to him.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2014, 08:36:46 PM »
FYI I'm pretty sure that "We can come get the pet back" clause will never come into play. For one thing, when would the shelter have time to do home visits on all their adopted animals?  I think it's just there to give the impression that the shelter somehow knows and sees all.

We used to have this clause in our contract, and it was really just in there as a fail safe in case the animal was confiscated by animal control and we heard about it - we had some ability to claim the dog back. 

We used it once, I think, in the 10 years I was with the organization.  A neighbor of one of our adopters called - the adopter had gone on a multi-week vacation with the dog locked in the backyard (in the desert, in the summer) and it had run out of food and water after a few days.  There was no way to get in to the back yard to leave food and water.  We called the adopter, who swore at us about getting into her business, and said that the dog would be fine for another few days and she'd take care of it when she got home.  Next week.  We did manage to get the dog without opening the gate, and we never heard from her again.

This makes sense to me, but the folks I worked with were very intrusive and very suspicious of us.  I guess I felt like.... we got approved to adopt 2 children, we are probably OK for a pet.  But it just seemed like they were over the top cautious.  I remember a conversation about medical care.  I would always provide a pet with medcial care, but I would probably choose not to treat a long term debilitating illness.   I did point out my old Corgi blew her knee out at the age of 2 years and we had $$$ surgery done on her leg. But - she was 2 years old, she had her whole life ahead of her and she could go back to her normal /pain free /being a big pain in the butt/ life :)

If I had an elderly dog that was diagnosed with cancer I would most likely euthanize the animal. ( depending on the circumstances ).  That apprently made me a cruel animal hater in their opinion.

I think part  reason for  the suspicion of that clause is the publicity from the Ellen DeGeneres situation.

IMHO rescues would do better to be less vague.  IE "if animal control finds cause to seize your dog we can take it back" VS "we can take the dog back at anytime if we deem it in the dog interest."   Vague terms are scary in contracts. 

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #54 on: April 07, 2014, 08:53:05 PM »
FYI I'm pretty sure that "We can come get the pet back" clause will never come into play. For one thing, when would the shelter have time to do home visits on all their adopted animals?  I think it's just there to give the impression that the shelter somehow knows and sees all.

We used to have this clause in our contract, and it was really just in there as a fail safe in case the animal was confiscated by animal control and we heard about it - we had some ability to claim the dog back. 

We used it once, I think, in the 10 years I was with the organization.  A neighbor of one of our adopters called - the adopter had gone on a multi-week vacation with the dog locked in the backyard (in the desert, in the summer) and it had run out of food and water after a few days.  There was no way to get in to the back yard to leave food and water.  We called the adopter, who swore at us about getting into her business, and said that the dog would be fine for another few days and she'd take care of it when she got home.  Next week.  We did manage to get the dog without opening the gate, and we never heard from her again.

My friend got herself a dog because of a similar situation.  She loves all animals but had previously been just a cat owner until she saw this poor little Lhasa Apso being neglected by one of her sister's neighbors.  The poor thing was being kept outside, on a short chain, no shelter and no food or water. By the way, she discovered this was going on shortly before Thanksgiving weekend and she's in the Midwest so she was worried how this poor thing would do if left out there during the winter.  She contacted the local sherriff's office and the shelter and long story short, the boyfriend of the woman who owned the dog contacted my friend on Black Friday saying "You can come get him if you're still interested..."

That was 4 years ago and the dog is doing much better! :) He's mostly blind due to cataracts and infection from his dirty hair getting into his eyes but he's otherwise a very good and healthy boy, and very loved! :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

siamesecat2965

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #55 on: April 11, 2014, 02:23:48 PM »
ROFL....I'd have pointed out that Great Danes, one of the largest breeds there is, make excellent apartment dogs. Yes, they need walks & outings to exercise/socialize, but they do very well in small spaces.

Same with Newfies and Mastiffs.

Try taking a mastiff with you on a long walk. Mine would sit at the end of the driveway and refuse to budge :-P

 

Oh you totally beat me to this! I had one as well, and well, let's just say walk, leash and her did NOT belong in the same sentence. We'd go out the door, literally 3 steps, and she'd collapse on the driveway in a dead heap. And moving 140+ lbs of dead weight dog is NOT fun. And the looks she'd give us? So very sad and pathetic.  Yet we'd open the door, to our NON fenced in yard, let her out, she'd do her business, and come RIGHT back in.

I'd say the only challenge with having a giant dog in an apt is having enough floor/couch space!

Southern_Continent

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #56 on: April 11, 2014, 06:05:31 PM »
Around here the rescues can be their own worst enemies it seems like. After we were married, we tried for months to adopt a dog. We couldn't meet anyone's criteria despite having a good income, fenced yard on a quiet street, no kids and I worked from hom. It was you might have kids someday (yeah, cuz heaven forbid you have dogs and kids at the same time), your yard isn't big enough (totally normal sized yard), you'll have to pay some crazy high application fee that costs more than buying a purebred from a irresponsible parent of the human variety, you have to agree to go to any and all lengths medically, etc. Always some weird excuse. We couldn't figure out who WOULD be able to adopt. I finally gave up and went with a irresponsible parent of the human variety, and we had a puppy within a week. She was the absolute best dog ever. We got another from the same irresponsible parent of the human variety who I also loved, but I was pretty much the only one, ha.

I'd prefer to support rescues, but back then, at least around here, they made it so darn hard!

Garden Goblin

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #57 on: April 13, 2014, 05:04:57 PM »
We tried to adopt a puppy from a rescue recently.  Four hours later, the woman we'd picked the dog up from was crying in hysterics and demanding the puppy back.

Under absolutely no circumstances would I ever sign papers that gave someone the right to take my kid's puppy away from him ever again.  Had I realized just how much he'd bonded with the puppy in that short a time, I'd have called a lawyer instead of giving the dog up the first time.

We got a mutt from Craiglist that, in spite of being the dumbest animal I have ever encountered, has become his bestest best spoiled happy friend.

cass2591

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #58 on: April 13, 2014, 07:36:10 PM »
I adopted a rescue that was advertised on Craigslist. He was in a foster home after being shipped from California, because CA is so overloaded with rescues they send them to WA for a better chance of adoption.

We emailed for about a week, since the dog I had to put down was extremely high maintenance I could not deal with that again. Foster mom drove him to me because she wanted to make sure it was a good fit and that I hadn't lied to her.

He is the best dog I've ever known. He has all his shots and has been chipped but I'm taking him to the vet for heartworm meds and general check up because while I don't think he has fleas, he scratches a lt.
There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

I am an old man and have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened. ~ Mark Twain

Adopting a pet won't change the world, but it will change the world for that pet.

knitwicca

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Re: "No Dog Should Ever Be In An Apartment!"
« Reply #59 on: April 14, 2014, 11:52:33 AM »
I lost my Corgi this past September. I am single, live in an apartment, have a wonderful vet very close to my home. There is a park directly across the driveway from my building.

Last week I contacted 2 different rescue organizations about adopting, I was turned down flat.
Rescue Org #1 - it is too soon for you to have another dog. Oh, you fly airplanes for a hobby? You cannot have one of our dogs because you might take it in the airplane. Too dangerous!  :o
Rescue Org #2 - (did NOT tell them I fly)  turned me down because I am single (who else will take care of the dog if you get sick), live in an apartment and have a job (away from home for 8 hours at a stretch!)