Wedding Bliss and Blues > Paper Trail

how do you feel about wedding announcements?

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sammycat:
I wouldn't see an announcement as  a request for a present. (If that actually is the intention of the HC sending it out, then they'll be out of luck by sending one to me).

If I'm not close enough to the HC to be invited to the wedding, or to even hear about it on the grapevine, then I'm probably going to be puzzled as to why I'm receiving an announcement, and likely won't care anyway.

lellah:

--- Quote from: CinnaMom on April 01, 2014, 09:48:02 PM ---I do agree that in this day and age, announcements can be seen as more of a request (for gifts). But, much also depends on your personal "style," in terms of what kind of precedent you've set with this kind of communication in the past. Do you often send letters by post? Thank you notes? Things like that? Or do you do most of your socialization in the electronic realm, as so many of us do these days? If you're the type of person who is known for stylish/formal communication via post, then it's much less likely that the announcement will be seen merely as a gift grab.

--- End quote ---

I am an inveterate mailer of things.  Generally I send a minimum of two letters and five greeting cards per month and have sent sympathy cards, get wells, birthday cards, etc  to most of the people I'd send announcements to.  Does this change anything?  Or shall I simply mention the news in the next correspondence?

jmarvellous:
We had a 40-person wedding; I offered to print announcements for my mom's and in-laws' friends and family who we weren't able to invite.
Nobody cared to do so because they were actually quite excited about being able to "announce" it in person again and again; they were leery of looking like gift-grabbers, too.

I think that if you're a regular letter/card-writer, then you should just write about it in those letters. It's also appropriate for a Christmas card.

Redneck Gravy:
I like getting announcements and don't consider them check requests. So I vote for sending them.

Just as I like to know that Cousin Sam graduated from college or high school, I also like knowing that Cousin Cindy married Jim Smith and they now live at xyz address. 

I don't FB much and don't care to receive my notices that way - others may, there is no right or wrong way to do it, I just personally prefer the printed by mail method.

TootsNYC:

--- Quote from: lellah on April 02, 2014, 09:18:08 AM ---
--- Quote from: CinnaMom on April 01, 2014, 09:48:02 PM ---I do agree that in this day and age, announcements can be seen as more of a request (for gifts). But, much also depends on your personal "style," in terms of what kind of precedent you've set with this kind of communication in the past. Do you often send letters by post? Thank you notes? Things like that? Or do you do most of your socialization in the electronic realm, as so many of us do these days? If you're the type of person who is known for stylish/formal communication via post, then it's much less likely that the announcement will be seen merely as a gift grab.

--- End quote ---

I am an inveterate mailer of things.  Generally I send a minimum of two letters and five greeting cards per month and have sent sympathy cards, get wells, birthday cards, etc  to most of the people I'd send announcements to.  Does this change anything?  Or shall I simply mention the news in the next correspondence?

--- End quote ---

Actually, I think the last idea--mentioning it in your next correspondence--might seem more natural (and less a gift grab). At least, more natural than a formally worded announcement.

But I think if you choose a less formal format, that an independent mailing will seem perfectly fine as well.
  I think it's the "announce the marriage of..." wording, and its formality, that make it resemble wedding invitations and confused the not-etiquette-savvy of the world.

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