Author Topic: Schooling  (Read 2988 times)

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Bobbie

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Schooling
« on: April 08, 2014, 03:43:14 PM »
I read a lot and would like more clarification on the schooling in other countries. In the US, federal law states that children must attend 180 days of school minimum.  In my state, children are not required to go to school till first grade.  Most kids in the US attend school as follows (public school):

Preschool (not free in less you have it subsidized my the government) 3-5 years old (my kids never went to preschool)

Kindergarten-5 years old by August 30th.  School usually starts in Aug-Sept and ends in May-June depending on your school district (in our district the teachers vote on the calendar for the coming school year).  Parents of boys that turned 5 over the summer before kindergarten were encouraged to wait a year for maturity.

Elementary (sometimes called grammar school) was 1st through 5th grades ages 6-11. This may vary in some states because this could also include 6th grade.

Junior High (sometimes called intermediate school) was 6th - 8th grades ages 11-14.  This may vary also to include 9th grade.

High School was 9th -12th grads ages 14-18. 

At the high school my kids attended, they could start taking college classes in 11th grade that would be credited at the university they attended.  I had to pay for the college credits but it got them ahead in the first year of college.  Also, kids can go to the local community college for a 2 year degree (Associates Degree) and transfer to a 4 year college.  Or they can take the vocational courses to be a welder or electrician or plumber etc.

In college, you do not have to declare a major to attend.  You can take general studies till you find your niche or lifelong passion.  My daughter was taking elementary education and needed to apply in her sophomore year to the College of Education at her University.  She is in her junior year and has changed her mayor to a double major in Education and History and plans to get her Masters. 

Adults can also go back to school and start college at any age or take further classes to complete a degree they never finished.  There are so many options and can take classes online.

What is the education system like in your country?
 

katycoo

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2014, 09:58:17 PM »
Its varies a little from state to state, but in Australia in NSW, we have:

School year runs Feb-Dec.

Primary School - grades K-6.
You must have turned 5 by 31 July to attend Kindergarten but its becoming increasingly common to hold kids back if they turn 5 in the first half of the year so that they start when they are already or are turning 6.

High School - grades 7-12.
Most students are 17 or 18 at graduation.

You can leave school after year 10 if you are undertaking alternative schooling (homeschooling, tech college etc), have a traineeship or apprenticeship, or if you are in full time employment.  Otherwise you must stay until you turn 17.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2014, 08:38:06 PM by katycoo »

kherbert05

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2014, 10:52:09 PM »
My district
Pegasus/PPCD - PPCD is for children under 5 who need early intervention this can be physical or cognitive disabilities. They get services free. Approximately an equal number of staff kids ages 3-4 and potty trained are accepted under Pegasus. They are in the same class as the PPCD students and both get a very rich early childhood curriculum with lots of free play time. There is a fee for Pegasus kids about = to what the parent would pay for daycare in the area.


PK (4 yo) - Optional but free if your child qualifies as at risk (Basically if your family speaks a language other than English at home or your family qualifies for free/reduced lunch. Only students who qualify can attend. It is all day if you are zoned for a school that feeds into the early childhood center. I'm not sure if it is free at other campuses that don't feed into the early childhood center.


K - Optional but free to all Have to be 5 by I think the first day of school but it may be Sept 1st.


1-5 mandatory*


*but you can homeschool/unschool/private school without much state interference or checking up.


K-5 is elementary


6th - mandatory* all by their lonesome on middle school campus


7th-8th Mandatory* Junior High


9th - 12th Mandatory* till 16 (I think) HS. Our district has several advanced programs including classes were students can earn dual credit HS/University. There are also distance learning classes/online classes for electives that some students want but not enough to justify hiring a specialized teacher to teach it. Or there are enough in the district but they are spread over all the HS, so the teacher might teach from 1 campus but use DL cart to connect all the other campuses.



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Harriet Jones

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2014, 10:56:45 PM »
In the various US school systems I've had experience with --
- Elementary: K (age 5) through 5th or 6th grade (11 or 12)
- Middle School/Junior High: 6th-8th, 7th-8th, or 7th-9th
- High School: 9th or 10th through 12th.

jilly

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2014, 02:58:36 AM »
In my area schools have recently changed.
It used to be reception (5yrs old) - 4 in primary. 5-8 in middle 9-11 (ending at 16) in high plus two years optional "6th form" to 18. Now uk wide you now cannot leave full time education until you are 18. My area has switched to having only 2 schools primary until you are 11 and High school after (I guess they split the 4 years of middle and split them between primary and high but i'm not sure).
this has made things messy for a while as schools have been closed combined and repurposed. I don't see how sending kids to bigger more centralised schools is going to help exam results, budgets yes, but the reason given for this change was exam results.

I believe our old 3 school system was almost unique in the UK and the 2 school system is normal?

DaisyG

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2014, 05:10:51 AM »
Jilly mentions middle schools for UK but I've not had experience with them. In my area, children start primary school / reception year the September before they turn 5. My niece's school in Wales did staggared entry so she started even earlier but it did give her a small taste of school before she started full-time. I think England and Wales have similar systems but Scotland has a different one.

In my area most primary schools have a nursery attached so many children attend aged 3-11. Then secondary school is 11-16 or 11-18. My friend's daughter is 16 and moving to a college in September as they have a wider range of subjects, then hopefully she'll go to university at 18.

My sister-in-law is in Serbia and complains that UK children start school too early. In Serbia children attend school aged 7-18. My niece/nephews' school there also does 2 shifts which I haven't heard of happening elsewhere, so some children start early in the morning and some children just attend in the afternoon.

Carotte

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2014, 07:40:31 AM »
Here's for France:

(schooling is obligatory for children aged 6 to 16)

- The year they turn 3 (school starts in September) they start preschool for 3 years, little, middle and big section. There's now a very-little (two years old) section so a kid might spend 4 years in preschool depending on their birthdate (and maturity I guess).

- Then there's primary school, 5 years that are considered split in 2 cycles, first cycle of two years, second cycle the last 3 years. Quite frankly appart from teachers I bet no one talks about the cycles. They don't have numbers (like first,second.. grade) but names (CP, CE1,CE2,CM1,CM2, they stand for preparatory course, elementary course one and two, medium course one and two  ::))

- Middle school (what we call college), 4 years, and just to go against the grain they go: 6th form, 5th, 4th, 3rd  ::). At the end of the third grade (9th grade for the rest of the world) you pass your Brevet, a national diploma that doesn't mean much anymore (a 100 years ago many kids would stop their schooling there so it was their way to prove reading/writing/mathematics... level).

- Lycée/High school, 3 years. 2nd, 1st and Terminal. In 1st (11th grade) you choose between Literary, science, Economic & Social section, that will determine the Baccalaureate (diploma) you'll have to pass in Terminal. There's a core knowledge for stuff like languages and sciences and each section has more advanced classes in their subjects.
There's a few options depending on the establishments, Arts, Advanced secondary language...
or
- Professional Lycée, 3 years also, is already geared towards a trade, but it's often the "last/default choice" of those that didn't do well in middle school (middle school can either say pass (to highschool), pass but to technological (or repeat if the student doesn't want to go to a professional highschool), or fail and repeat).
or
- Technological lycée, 3 years also, is even more geared towards a trade and is more stringent, more of a personal choice than Technological. It's the difference between knowing you want to be a chef (go to tech) or don't really know what you want to do with your life, cooking's ok I guess (go to pro).
They can achieve a first diploma in 2 years and/or go for a second diploma after the third year.
There's now a bridge possible between their diploma and getting into the university to get a license/further ed.

- University, open to all (age wise). Licence in 3 years, Master in 5, Doctorate in 8 (medical Doctorate in 11 depending on specialisation).
or
- higher education schools, either public or private.

So for a basic student:
 - 3 to 5 (y/old): preschool (3 years)
 - 6 to 10: elementary, 5 years, correspond to grade 1 to 5.
 - 11 to 14: middle school, 4 years, correspond to grade 6 to 9
 - 15 to 17: high school, 3 years, correspond to grade 10 to 12, ends with getting the Bac - High school diploma.


 ETA - I eddited a few things after talking with my mother (who teachs in a highschool) because I had them backward (between the pro and tech highschool -
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 10:31:49 AM by Carotte »

English1

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2014, 08:00:05 AM »
Also in the UK, education is compulsory, but not school. Some parents home-school.


Weez

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2014, 09:35:28 AM »
Now uk wide you now cannot leave full time education until you are 18.
I think that's just England. There's no such thing as a UK education system as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each have their own Education system.

Currently in Scotland, children can start preschool from the term after their 3rd birthday (government subsidise 12.5 hours per week, rising to 15 hours per week from August 2014).

They start Primary 1 in August: children with birthdays from March to December have to start in August of that year, those who don't turn five until January or February of the following year have the option to delay until the following August (so parents can choose if their children will be amongst the youngest or oldest of their class). Generally, primary 1-7 will be in one school; larger cities might split them to make best use of existing buildings.

Secondary 1 follows primary 7 (so about 12 years) and compulsory education ends the term after they turn 16, so usually at the end of S4. If they're not 16 then, they either have to stay on at school until Christmas or attend a college course at the local further education college (Perhaps like a community college? Generally vocational courses, with some courses that can lead into university courses).

jilly

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2014, 03:27:34 PM »
Now uk wide you now cannot leave full time education until you are 18.
I think that's just England. There's no such thing as a UK education system as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each have their own Education system.

Currently in Scotland, children can start preschool from the term after their 3rd birthday (government subsidise 12.5 hours per week, rising to 15 hours per week from August 2014).

They start Primary 1 in August: children with birthdays from March to December have to start in August of that year, those who don't turn five until January or February of the following year have the option to delay until the following August (so parents can choose if their children will be amongst the youngest or oldest of their class). Generally, primary 1-7 will be in one school; larger cities might split them to make best use of existing buildings.

Secondary 1 follows primary 7 (so about 12 years) and compulsory education ends the term after they turn 16, so usually at the end of S4. If they're not 16 then, they either have to stay on at school until Christmas or attend a college course at the local further education college (Perhaps like a community college? Generally vocational courses, with some courses that can lead into university courses).

 :-[  I should pay more attention when I listen to the news.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2014, 04:40:58 PM »
I'm in the US and in my area our schools are (I think still are) set up like this:

K-8 are all part of elementary school. No junior high is done though the 7th and 8th grade students are often in their own area and referred to as being "junior high". They swapped classes, had lockers (usually in home room), and got to have dances. Most of the schools also offered pre-K for kids to start before kindergarten. I think kindergarten is mandatory but I'm pretty sure you can wait a year if it's best for the student. Not exactly sure. Because my birthday is in late October I was already 5 and turned 6 while I was in kindergarten. So no one was suggesting I wait. My daycare wanted me to start sooner, my mother wanted me to start sooner, the school did not care about their wants cause rules is rules.

9th-12th is high school. And I know that in my state you can drop out after completing the 10th grade. I know this because I used it as an argument when my school didn't want to let me graduate early because they weren't sure I'd actually attend college since no one else in my family had.  ::) I was a junior and pointed out I could just drop out and get my GED (my mom would have killed me she was determined to watch me walk across that stage) and all of a sudden I was allowed to graduate early.

After that is college. You can go to a traditional 4-year university, I've known people to finish in 3-7 years. There's technical/trade schools, which are geared towards learning a trade skill. Usually things like message therapy, automotive, HVAC, culinary programs, ect. They range from as little as 6 months up to 2 years to complete, depending on what you study and if you go part-time or full time. There is also community college, where you receive an associates degree, usually takes 2-4 years depending on part time or full time study. Often people transfer to 4 year universities afterwards. It's good if you aren't sure what you want to study, or need to save money as they are typically cheaper then a 4 year university.

I enrolled in a community college while I was still in high school, which is allowed. However you can't get your associates degree until you have your high school diploma or GED. Which was why I wanted to graduate early, I was one class shy of getting my associates. So after I graduated both I enrolled in a 4 year university, but I went in as a junior (or 3rd year) and graduated in 2 years instead of 4.

Graduate school is a thing. Depending on what you study, what your degree is (Masters/Doctorate), it takes anywhere from 2-8 years....or more. I finished my masters in 2 years and my PhD in 4. And as far as I can tell, your options for study are limited only by your imagination. 

And of course anything after high school is optional.

lilfox

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2014, 04:49:02 PM »
States vary considerably across the US, too, in terms of what is required especially at the youngest ages.  Bobbie's state doesn't require kindergarten, others require only half-day kg (free) but offer full day at cost to parents, and still others require full-day kindergarten (free).  I have heard that at least one state is going to require preschool.

Age of admission to kindergarten changes by state too though it is usually set between August and December (child must be 5 by this date), so kids entering kindergarten can be 4, 5, or 6.  Parents can obtain a waiver for early entrance to kindergarten as well, if their child passes a readiness test even though they don't meet the birthday/age requirement. Holding kids back a year before they enter kindergarten is probably more common, especially for boys.

In addition to public (free) and private (paid, sometimes affiliated with a religion) high schools, we also have technical, alternative, and "magnet" high schools.  Magnet schools are typically defined by a focus like STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) or the Arts, and most if not all require a special application process (including an aptitude test).  On-line high schools are gaining popularity as an alternative to traditional high school too.

Also, language immersion schools (regular classes taught in a non-English language) and charter and co/op schools (kind of niche specialty schools, some requiring high levels of parental involvement) for all grades are emerging.


Ereine

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2014, 12:48:35 AM »
I'm in Finland.

Preschool isn't compulsory here but these days it's offered everywhere and I guess it's more regulated. When I was a child preschool in my day care meant doing some exercises for the hour when other children were napping. It's for children who turn six that year.

Alakoulu ("lower school") is grades 1-6 and starts the year the child turns 7 (though it's possible to start at 8 or maybe 6). In theory there's the same teacher the whole time, but obviously it doesn't always happen. We had different teachers for English, Music and crafts (and for the alternative to Religious studies, our own teacher taught the rest of class), our own teacher taught everything else.

Yläkoulu ("upper school") is grades 7-9. Different teachers for all the subjects. Alakoulu and yläkoulu comprise the peruskoulu, the compulsory schooling. There's been talk of making one year past peruskoulu compulsory but I'm not sure if the law will be passed, the opposition doesn't agree with it.

After peruskoulu about half of the students continue to lukio, sort of high school. It's normally three years but can be done in from two and half to four years. I'm not completely sure about the latest changes but I think it's still composed of modules, some of which are compulsory, some of which are related to ylioppilaskirjoitukset, the school leaving exam and some of which are sort of extra. You need to take a certain number of modules from each group but the students have a lot of freedom (and responsibility).

The other half continues to trade schools. These days it's possible to combine them with lukio. You have to apply to both lukio and trade schools so someone with bad grades might not get into any school, at least not one they want the most (when I was in lukio my school was popular with students for smaller communities nearby and the schools in there might have lower grade requirements so students from my town might travel there, it's a bit strange system). It's possible to do 10th grade after peruskoulu, which is composed regular school to improve grades and work experience.

Weez

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2014, 12:58:59 PM »
Now uk wide you now cannot leave full time education until you are 18.

I think that's just England. There's no such thing as a UK education system as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each have their own Education system.


 :-[  I should pay more attention when I listen to the news.

To be honest, unless you're watching the news in Wales, Northern Ireland or Scotland, it's unlikely that the different systems will have been mentioned. The "England = UK" reporting on the National news is heavily criticised outwith England.

Rohanna

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2014, 08:27:19 PM »
Ontario Canada-

Junior K starts for children who are 4 by December of that year. Neither JK or SK is mandatory, though there is no "redshirting" by holding back to start a year later unless a special need or learning disability is diagnosed. Children who parents feel they aren't ready to start in their JK year will simply start with their age mates the following year, or if they choose, by grade one. All kindergartens in the province are becoming full-day programs, and most parents enroll straight into JK. There is no cost for jk or sk.

At the end of JK anglophone parents can choose to send their children to French immersion school starting in SK (available most places barring rural schools). Francophone families or those with language rights can enrol directly into a francophone-only school from JK. There are two publicly funded boards in Ontario - a public board and a Roman Catholic board. You don't have to be RC to attend the RC board but it's rare not to be.

Jk, SK and grades 1-6 are generally always in the same school, known as a primary school. Sometimes grade 7-8 are tagged onto a primary or a high school, sometimes they are on their On their own in an Intermediate school. High school is usually grades 9-12. Ontario phased out grade 13 about 10 years ago I believe.

In short:

JK: 3 and 4 year olds (optional)
SK: 4 and 5 year olds (optional)
Primary school -Grade 1-6: 5/6 to 11/12
Intermediate school- Grade 7-8: 12/13- 13/14
High school- Grade 9-12: 13/14-16/17

Most kids will be 17/18 by the time they graduate at year's end.



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