Author Topic: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?  (Read 7140 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #60 on: March 19, 2014, 09:55:47 AM »
I work with someone with advanced diabetic neuropathy, who is in the care of several physicians to keep her health as good as possible. She gets upset that I still wear sandals and walk around barefoot at home, even though I do not have the same ailments that she does.

It is very frustrating for her, but I live in Florida and wear sandals 10 months out of the year.

sammycat

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #61 on: March 19, 2014, 08:27:46 PM »
Was I the only one that came to this thread thinking, "Shoes?  I love shoes!  Doesn't everyone love shoes?". 
Irony is that I thought that while barefoot.

I've always had a weakness for buying shoes, and have heaps of them, yet I absolutely loathe wearing them. I never wear them at home, inside or out, or when visiting my mother or sister. (I wear them to their houses, but always take them off when I get there).

As was very common amongst the kids I grew up with, I have very fond memories of running around barefoot most of the time during playtime, both at home and school. Actually, now I think about it, my primary school encouraged us to go barefoot and it was an actual rule at my son's kindy that they had to remove their shoes when arriving each day.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #62 on: March 19, 2014, 08:41:15 PM »
Was I the only one that came to this thread thinking, "Shoes?  I love shoes!  Doesn't everyone love shoes?". 
Irony is that I thought that while barefoot.

I've always had a weakness for buying shoes, and have heaps of them, yet I absolutely loathe wearing them. I never wear them at home, inside or out, or when visiting my mother or sister. (I wear them to their houses, but always take them off when I get there).

As was very common amongst the kids I grew up with, I have very fond memories of running around barefoot most of the time during playtime, both at home and school. Actually, now I think about it, my primary school encouraged us to go barefoot and it was an actual rule at my son's kindy that they had to remove their shoes when arriving each day.

I also thought someone had been watching reruns of Sex in the City and wanted to know if the obsession was accurate and I was ready to say yes.

greencat

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #63 on: March 21, 2014, 12:55:39 AM »
I also have the simultaneous addiction to purchasing shoes, and a dislike of wearing them in general.  I used to go barefoot at work most of the time - we were allowed to since we sat at our desks all day, as long as we wore shoes into the building.  I can't do that anymore because my new job requires occasional heavy lifting and other miscellaneous things that requires me to have on closed-toed and hard to slip off shoes :(

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #64 on: March 21, 2014, 07:45:51 PM »
We were on Oahu last fall.  My husband had to run into UPS to ship something the day we flew out because it wouldn't fit in the suitcase. He couldn't get into the luggage and had to go in his swim trunks, t-shirt, and sandals.  When he came back, he reported that he was dressed like everyone else in the store 8).  I love Hawaii.

baglady

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #65 on: April 04, 2014, 07:09:59 PM »
Bagman works in a warehouse. They have a "no open-toed shoes in the warehouse" rule. In the warmer months, the folks who work up front, processing orders, often wear sandals/flip-flops to work. If they have to talk to someone in the warehouse, they stand right on the line separating sales area from warehouse and call him over.

Then there was the day his daughter the law student visited him at work. This is a young woman who lives in bare feet or flip-flops whenever weather permits, and often when it doesn't. She was wearing flip-flops that day. She read the "no open-toed shoes" sign, took off her flip-flops and walked into the warehouse barefoot. Hey, the sign doesn't say *anything* about bare feet -- just open-toed shoes.

Girl is going to make a helluva lawyer someday.  :)
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dirtyweasel

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #66 on: April 12, 2014, 06:06:36 PM »
I used to love going around barefoot as a child until the day we had a picnic at the local lake and my cousin stepped on a fish hook.  Ever since then I've had a fear of walking barefoot outside.

I think people are concerned for situations exactly like the one above and it's usually a way for stores to protect themselves so that customers don't get hurt.



TeamBhakta

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #67 on: April 26, 2014, 09:53:18 PM »
I thought of this thread after I went to McDonald's last night. A guy in way too low shorts & no shirt got in line. The manager stepped out of the kitchen and said "Sir, you'll have to go put on a shirt. You can't be in here without a shirt." I wanted to high five the manager  8)

ladyknight1

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Re: Why are Americans so concerned about shoes?
« Reply #68 on: April 30, 2014, 07:47:22 PM »
When I worked at Home Depot, we had several regular customers who would get the shirt completely on as they walked through the entrance. The only thing we had to tell people not to have in the store was pets. No pet sign on the door, but people would still bring their dogs in, without a companion or service animal vest.