Author Topic: Schooling  (Read 2820 times)

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katycoo

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2014, 08:20:12 PM »
School was also divided into houses and you could earn points for your house with good school work throughout the year. You also competed on house teams for different sports and for sports day. Kind of like Harry Potter :)
In high school they were very keen on houses the colour of the stripe in your tie showed which house you were in. As well as a head teacher for the school there were heads of house and organised events where pupils could raise money for the chosen house charity. each house was almost a school within a school. The idea was to help pupils adjust to attending such a big school (the biggest in the area) as some of the schools that fed into it were 1/8 the size it could be very intimidating.

is the idea of houses a UK only one?

Nope, we have houses in Australia but IME they're pretty exclusively used for sporting purposes.  Nothing academic was counted towards house achievements. 

I do recall a few other competitions where they were used, such as drama competitions but they were pretty rare and barely enforced.  My year 11 drama project we had to run the play each of our houses put on.  So my class was divided by house and we allocated ourselves crew roles in order to stage the play and we had to cast it from students in the other grades from within our house.  Pretty sure the casting wasn't ever checked though.

We had 4 houses and they were separated alphabetically by your surname to determine what house you'd be in.

sammycat

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2014, 09:06:47 PM »
is the idea of houses a UK only one?

Nope, we have houses in Australia but IME they're pretty exclusively used for sporting purposes.  Nothing academic was counted towards house achievements. 
[/quote]

My experience too.

My intermediate school in NZ had houses but I'm 99% sure it was restricted to mainly sports things as well.

Snooks

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2014, 03:15:33 PM »
Are there any regulations around home schooling in the US (I appreciate it probably varies by state/district).  I just watched a Bakery Boss where the owners of the bakery were home schooling their kids in the back room of the bakery, to me it didn't seem like an ideal set up to teach kids.  In England the local education authority can check homeschooling parents, is there a similar set up in the US?

kherbert05

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #33 on: April 27, 2014, 04:26:40 PM »
Addressing the 180....In our school district they rarely cancel school (the only reason is if the school buses can't make it through the snow drifts).  If school is cancelled, they have to make it up by taking a vacation day because teachers can't work beyond their contract.
Here we have bad weather days built into the calendar. I've been teaching in my district since 2001. We have only used 3 bad weather days. Two are this year Holy Thursday and Memorial Day.


We did not have to make up days after Rita or Ike. There was so much time lost and it was so wide spread that TEA gave everyone waivers. The same thing happened back when I was in HS 2x within months of each other.


The end of my sophomore year our area of Houston got hit by tornadoes or micro-burst. With some schools having minor damage (My HS was going to have some work done over the summer. Supplies like fiberglass insulation had been delivered and was scattered around the central courtyard by the wind/tornadoes/micro-bursts) and power outages they called school. It was the last full day of school. The next three days were 1/2 days with finals. TEA didn't make us make up the day. The kids were beating down the doors to get our review sheets and books. They ended up each wing's emergency exit so we could come in see our teachers and pick up our books and review sheets.


Then in August Alicia hit. None of our buildings were damaged, and flooding wasn't a problem in district, but the schools didn't have power. Without power the health department shuts you down, because you can't serve lunch - also if the water is out. We were out maybe a week, and school had just started. TEA gave everyone waivers then too.


I remember being sent home numerous times for power outages. If we got to the magic hour where attendance was taken for the state and power was out we went home but the day counted. If the power went out after lunch was served and stayed out for I think 60 min we were sent home. No power = no ac which can be dangerous in buildings built for AC they heat up fast. My elementary was pre-ac building and could be kept at a safe temperature. Still the nurse called mom after power was out for more than 30 min to pick sis and I up. Sis has had heat exhaustion several times and I was usually in massive pain and covered with a rash by then. It was the 70's and polyester does not breathe.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

dawnfire

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2014, 06:39:21 AM »
is the idea of houses a UK only one?

Nope, we have houses in Australia but IME they're pretty exclusively used for sporting purposes.  Nothing academic was counted towards house achievements. 

My experience too.

My intermediate school in NZ had houses but I'm 99% sure it was restricted to mainly sports things as well.
[/quote]

It's pretty much the same here too but in my boys school, they use houses to allocate homeroom classes as well.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2014, 06:41:51 AM by dawnfire »

Harriet Jones

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Re: Schooling
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2014, 01:46:22 PM »
Are there any regulations around home schooling in the US (I appreciate it probably varies by state/district).  I just watched a Bakery Boss where the owners of the bakery were home schooling their kids in the back room of the bakery, to me it didn't seem like an ideal set up to teach kids.  In England the local education authority can check homeschooling parents, is there a similar set up in the US?

It depends on the state.  Some states have stricter home schooling standards, some have hardly any.