Author Topic: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?  (Read 12439 times)

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gellchom

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2014, 11:36:06 PM »
I don't like to give out information, either, but I strongly agree with the posters who beg not to take it out on the cashiers by being rude or even snippy or cold about it.  They are just doing their job, and if they are anything like the posters here who report having had such jobs, they already are unhappy enough.  True, they are representatives of their company, but it isn't their choice.

Even "No, thank you," in my opinion, isn't quite enough, because it isn't really clear -- I mean, someone asked you for something, they didn't offer something, so "no thank you" isn't really responsive.  If I were the cashier, I'd probably think you didn't hear me right and ask again.

I usually say something like, "If you don't really need it, I'd rather not give my [phone number, address, whatever].  But I like Rose Red's formula: "I know you are required to ask, but I don't give out personal information" better.

poundcake

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2014, 12:29:47 AM »
JenJay, I stopped shopping at the grocery store you're talking about. I felt bad for the cashiers and stockers, but seriously, I do NOT need two people PER AISLE engaging me in conversation and asking if I need help! Jesus, let my eyes focus on the print on the cans first before you start yammering at me about what I'm looking for and what might go with it! Yes, I stopped shopping there, and started writing letters and Yelp reviews about these practices, and, only a few months later, the in-your-face "helpfulness" had been dialed back significantly.

Quote
Just staying away does nothing unless you tell the right people why. These stupid ideas (upselling & pushing loyalty cards and/or credit cards, requiring the cashier to ask 3 times) come from some guy in a suit at corporate HQ, who has never worked retail (or hasn't done so in 20 years), and thinks it will be such! a! good! idea!  ::) Not only can the poor cashiers get fired for non-compliance, so can the managers.

RooRoo is right. I've mentioned before one of my first jobs, working at a pizza chain. Some genius in corporate decided that we needed to go out of our way to greet customers who ordered for pickup. His brilliant plan was that, say, if Lisa called in to order a pizza, when she showed up to pick it up, one of us was supposed to cry, "Hey, everyone, Lisa's here for her pizza!" and then we'd all chorus "HI, LISA!" Mr. Corporate thought it would be cute and fun, like whenever Norm showed up at Cheers and everyone cheered "NORM!"

Well. At best, customers looked taken aback and a little confused. Quite a few found it problematic, and complained after. Some felt their privacy was being violated. Customers on the phones hated that their orders were being interrupted/unheard because of the loud yelling. Several occasions involved "Lisa" calling in for the pizza, but "Unnamed Companion/Spouse Obviously Not Lisa" coming in to pick it up, so we'd end up trying to cover that up with improv: "Hi, Lisa's Husband! Oh, just boyfriend? Sorry, what's your name? Pete? HI, PETE!" Most just hated that they were being "yelled at." Comment cards saying this began pouring in to the head office immediately.

Within a week, the geniuses at Corporate decided maybe this wasn't the friendliest route to good customer service with our pick-ups after all.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2014, 12:55:24 AM »
I was at a store today and was asked (as is often the case these days) for personal information at checkout.  This happened AFTER I had already handed over my credit card.  I used my standard "No Thank You" line...but the clerk was persistent.  Was I rude?  The conversation went like this:

Clerk:  Please fill this out.
Me:  No thank you.
Her:  We need this information for your purchase.
Me:  No thank you. 
Clerk:  We have to have this information in our system in order to complete your.
Me:  I am not giving you my personal information.
Clerk:  Rings up purchase and was very polite the rest of the transaction. 

And obviously did NOT need the information to execute the transaction.  Had she insisted, I would have left without purchasing.

Any other suggestions for how to handle?

I'd honestly be baffled at this question, as I've never heard it before. Sometimes at museums and galleries I get asked for my post code, but never for detailed personal information at a regular shop. My reaction would be to blurt out "Why on earth do you need my personal information for this item?!"

blarg314

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2014, 05:40:39 AM »
You were supposed to glance in the customer's basket, make a note of what they were buying, and suggest an item from your department that tied in. For example, customer has an angel food cake, suggest some fresh strawberries. , contacting corporate and letting them know their new ideas stink really does work!

I think that wins for basic illogic.

Aside from the annoying customers part, what's going to happen if it works?  The customer, with their basket half unloaded says "That's a great idea - I'll be back in a minute" and heads off to the produce section to fetch some strawberries, leaving the line stalled until they get back.

The first time someone asks, I say no politely. The second time, I say no firmly. If they insist after that, or claim that they have to have the information for me to buy the product, I'll leave without purchasing. I'm not going to be rude to the cashier, but I'm not going to spend money at a store that thinks that bullying me into handing over personal information solely for their marketing purposes.

When I'm visiting the US or Canada, mind you, there's always the option of giving them my phone number. Mind you, given that my number starts with a zero, it's not going to be much use.

TabathasGran

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 08:17:12 AM »
I just smile, look directly at them and say "No."  Apparently they know I mean it because almost no one ever asks a second time.

I think "no" carries more weight by itself. 

It felt rude to be so blunt at first but I'm used to it now.  I also do this for donations requests at the checkout.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2014, 04:05:32 PM by TabathasGran »

m2kbug

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2014, 11:34:42 AM »
Unfortunately the cashier's hands are tied.  This comes from corporate and employees can get in trouble if they don't ask.  I have even just filled out dummy information to appease the cashier for those little discount tabs.  Otherwise, all you can do is what you did.  You can express your displeasure to the cashier, but don't bite her head off.  They can, hopefully, pass on the multiple complaints to their manager.  Also, call or write the corporate entity who thought it was a brilliant idea.  These people don't actually have to do the things they are requiring and apparently never get harassed while shopping, so they remain clueless on how annoying this is. 

nutraxfornerves

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2014, 12:13:05 PM »
Quote
"Hey, everyone, Lisa's here for her pizza!" and then we'd all chorus "HI, LISA!"
I'm surprised they didn't have college students happily making up unfortunate or even obscene names just to be funny.
"Hey, everyone, Onweed's here for her pizza!"
"Hi, Onweed!"

I did run into one of those information things that made sense because the clerks explained it. The company was asking for ZIP codes from all shoppers to help them decide what might be the best place to locate a near store.  But all they wanted was a ZIP code, no other identifying info.

Several times a year, the museum where I volunteer asks for either the ZIP code or country, if not from the US. That helps provide information on visitors that is useful when applying for grants or loans of objects.

Nutrax
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kherbert05

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2014, 12:36:27 PM »
I was at a store today and was asked (as is often the case these days) for personal information at checkout.  This happened AFTER I had already handed over my credit card.  I used my standard "No Thank You" line...but the clerk was persistent.  Was I rude?  The conversation went like this:

Clerk:  Please fill this out.
Me:  No thank you.
Her:  We need this information for your purchase.
Me:  No thank you. 
Clerk:  We have to have this information in our system in order to complete your.
Me:  I am not giving you my personal information.
Clerk:  Rings up purchase and was very polite the rest of the transaction. 

And obviously did NOT need the information to execute the transaction.  Had she insisted, I would have left without purchasing.

Any other suggestions for how to handle?

I'd honestly be baffled at this question, as I've never heard it before. Sometimes at museums and galleries I get asked for my post code, but never for detailed personal information at a regular shop. My reaction would be to blurt out "Why on earth do you need my personal information for this item?!"
It lets them target advertising for things popular in specific zones.
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mich3554

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2014, 12:54:11 PM »
I live in a suburb that has a single ZIP code.  The local Michael's asks every customer at checkout for their ZIP code.  I'm sure that 999 out of 1000 customers have the same ZIP.  Why don't the cashiers just enter the ZIP without slowing the checkout line down further by asking???   Well, one time when the cashier asked for my ZIP, I said, "I live in [our town]".  She didn't know the ZIP code  ::).

It is annoying to be asked for personal information, but I know that the cashiers are only doing it because they have to, and it's a minor annoyance, so I'm always polite but firm.  It's a very minor thing, not worth getting upset or nasty about.  To me, the test of etiquette is how you act when things don't go exactly as you'd like.

I did ask about zip codes and was told that it was how they determine where to put stores.  So zip code is the only piece I will give out because I would LOVE not to have to travel 30 miles to Tuesday Morning.

Anything else?  Nope.

JenJay

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2014, 01:43:31 PM »
You were supposed to glance in the customer's basket, make a note of what they were buying, and suggest an item from your department that tied in. For example, customer has an angel food cake, suggest some fresh strawberries. , contacting corporate and letting them know their new ideas stink really does work!

I think that wins for basic illogic.

Aside from the annoying customers part, what's going to happen if it works?  The customer, with their basket half unloaded says "That's a great idea - I'll be back in a minute" and heads off to the produce section to fetch some strawberries, leaving the line stalled until they get back.


No, this was in the departments, not the checkstand. My examples were from the produce department but everyone was supposed to do it. If you walked into the bakery with strawberries they'd recommend the angel food cake. So as a customer you'd get hit up to buy something you didn't want in every single department and maybe a couple of times in the general aisles, if you were unlucky enough to bump into multiple employees. Yeah.  ::)

Yvaine

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2014, 01:50:10 PM »
You were supposed to glance in the customer's basket, make a note of what they were buying, and suggest an item from your department that tied in. For example, customer has an angel food cake, suggest some fresh strawberries. , contacting corporate and letting them know their new ideas stink really does work!

I think that wins for basic illogic.

Aside from the annoying customers part, what's going to happen if it works?  The customer, with their basket half unloaded says "That's a great idea - I'll be back in a minute" and heads off to the produce section to fetch some strawberries, leaving the line stalled until they get back.


No, this was in the departments, not the checkstand. My examples were from the produce department but everyone was supposed to do it. If you walked into the bakery with strawberries they'd recommend the angel food cake. So as a customer you'd get hit up to buy something you didn't want in every single department and maybe a couple of times in the general aisles, if you were unlucky enough to bump into multiple employees. Yeah.  ::)

Ugh. And it would just rub me the wrong way to have people peering into my cart the whole time too. I like the polite fiction that no one notices what I'm buying at the grocery store, just in case it's nothing but ice cream, wine, and a 10-pound box of Midol.  ;D

JenJay

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2014, 02:04:05 PM »
You were supposed to glance in the customer's basket, make a note of what they were buying, and suggest an item from your department that tied in. For example, customer has an angel food cake, suggest some fresh strawberries. , contacting corporate and letting them know their new ideas stink really does work!

I think that wins for basic illogic.

Aside from the annoying customers part, what's going to happen if it works?  The customer, with their basket half unloaded says "That's a great idea - I'll be back in a minute" and heads off to the produce section to fetch some strawberries, leaving the line stalled until they get back.


No, this was in the departments, not the checkstand. My examples were from the produce department but everyone was supposed to do it. If you walked into the bakery with strawberries they'd recommend the angel food cake. So as a customer you'd get hit up to buy something you didn't want in every single department and maybe a couple of times in the general aisles, if you were unlucky enough to bump into multiple employees. Yeah.  ::)

Ugh. And it would just rub me the wrong way to have people peering into my cart the whole time too. I like the polite fiction that no one notices what I'm buying at the grocery store, just in case it's nothing but ice cream, wine, and a 10-pound box of Midol.  ;D

Exactly! We felt like total creepy stalkers. We had a lot of fun joking about inappropriate suggestions we could have made based on a customer's purchases, though. Like "Hello sir, I see you've got a microwave dinner and single-serving Ben & Jerry's. If you need the 30lb bag of cat food it's on aisle 3. Can I show you where that is?" or "Oooh, bottle of wine, two steaks, and some roses, eh? The condoms are on aisle 5!" In your example we could have recommended some gossip magazines or maybe a discount chick-flick.  ;D

I miss my coworkers (though not that job!).

Aquamarine

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2014, 03:13:30 PM »
I sometimes wonder what is wrong with the people that come up with this crap at corporate.  Do they live in a parallel dimension that the rest of us don't know about?  What normal, rational human being going about their daily life thinks that some of the things read about in this thread are a good idea?

Let's make our customers, feel spied on, hassled and pressured to buy more stuff, that will really make them happier loyal customers.  Newsflash to corporate everywhere: not everything has to be "FUN", sometimes people are just doing their chores because they have to do them, not because they want to.

I truly do not understand where they think up some of these bizarre things they want their employees to do.  The yelling at you at the pizza place seems extremely unsettling to me.  Hope no one with social anxiety issues got pizza from them when they were going through this phase.

I wish someday one of these people could sit me down and explain their thinking because it is something that truly baffles me and seems to defy good simple common sense. 
Always be polite, even to nasty people. Not because they are nice, but because you are.

Bottlecaps

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2014, 03:31:59 PM »
I'm going to go out on a limb here and offer a different (and reasonable) explanation for why stores sometimes ask for your information.

Mr. Bottlecaps works in auto parts. Almost all auto parts come with some sort of warranty or another, whether it's three months or a lifetime warranty. Some parts houses ask for your name and/or phone number to put in the system so if you need to use the warranty, they can quickly look up the purchase and verify that you in fact bought that part at that retailer (or in some cases, that particular location). Now granted, it's not really required as long as you keep your receipt, but he was required to at least ask, and Mr. Bottlecaps would tell people that he was asking for their info strictly for warranty purposes (I would hope all parts salespeople would explain this, but who knows). If they refused, that was OK, but he would definitely explain to them that they needed to keep the receipt in case they needed to bring the part back on warranty. In the case of heat-printed receipts, it's hard to get them to last more than a few months, let alone a lifetime. :(

The parts store he works at now doesn't require this information. Their receipts are not heat-printed, but printed out of a regular office laser printer, so as long as you store them properly where they won't get wet or anything, they should last a lifetime. Heat-printed receipts are a whole other story though, lol. I've dug heat-printed receipts out of my purse when I clean it only to find that a receipt from barely a month ago (that's about how often I clean my purse out, lol) had almost none of the print still visible on it.

In cases like this, if you're still not comfortable giving any info out but the integrity of your receipt might not last as long as your warranty, and you want to make sure you can use your warranty if needed, I suppose you could make up a name and/or phone number. As long as you can remember the made-up information, then it should work. :)

All that said though, if you're buying tomatoes instead of an alternator, and they refuse to accept "no" as an answer, be polite and don't take it out on the cashier, but by all means, discontinue the transaction and leave.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2014, 03:34:34 PM by Bottlecaps »
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shortstuff

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Re: When "No Thank You" dosen't work...what next?
« Reply #29 on: April 12, 2014, 04:23:57 PM »
I hate being asked more than I hate asking at my job. I'll ask once, and most regular customers know it's simply to pull up their profile, so the purchase is linked to them. Some ask why, I tell them, and also that it's totally optional. And for those who don't want to, there's a button we can hit to decline and continue. But please complain to corporate if you're going to. The employees have NO say over this, and can actually get in trouble for not asking according to what corporate decrees.

I've always taken this route when I was in retail jobs.  For phone numbers, it reverse-looked up the address to mail out coupons.  Zip codes were for the newspapers to have flyers.  My script was ask first, and most people gave it out.  Those who asked why got the reasonable explanation.  Anyone who still has reservations was "allowed" to not participate.  Quotes because I was a teenager, I didn't really care whether or not they gave me the info as long as no one, customer or manager, was yelling at me :) 

The worst case of asking for personal info was this: my mom has a store credit card for a nice homewares/clothing type department store.  Her new card was mailed out, and the first time she used in store they asked for her driver's license number!  it was "policy" when activating a card to input and the save the DL number.  My mom naturally, and politely, refused that step, and asked to just continue with the transaction.  The cashier said she was literally unable to proceed without the info, and mom was about to ask for a manger when I had a thought. 

"What happens for someone without a driver's license?"  "Oh, we just use the phone number."  "Well, can my mom use her phone number instead?!?"  Stupid corporate policy, and the poor cashier was "off script" and didn't supply us with a workaround.  Stinky situation.